Loved The Girl on the Train? Here are 6 New Books to Read Next

Yes, yes, we know. You know. Everybody and their great aunt knows. If you liked Gillian Flynn’s dark and suspenseful Gone Girl, then you have to read Paula Hawkins’s page-turner The Girl on the Train—and vice versa. But you likely knocked out both of those books before the calendar flipped over to 2016. So what now?

You can’t just go around and around reading these two admittedly awesome books for the rest of your days, pretending you don’t anticipate the plot twists, and you’ve likely read a readalike or two since you first devoured them. So to keep the twists coming, we’ve rounded up some recent and upcoming releases that are musts for any The Girl on the Train superfan.

Maestra, by L.S. Hilton
Maestra, out April 19, marks the first in a new trilogy from author L.S. Hilton—and as it’s already been optioned for film by Columbia Pictures, you know it’s going to be buzzworthy. This sexy psychological thriller stars cynical narrator Judith Rashleigh, an assistant at a London art auction house by day, a hostess at a seedy club by night, and a high-class escort on her nights off. After getting fired from the art house for discovering a dark secret, she agrees to accompany one of the club’s biggest clients to the French Riviera—where he ends up the victim of a fatal accident. Judith must flee, while faking it among the rich and famous in this unpredictable new page-turner.

Try Not to Breathe, by Holly Seddon
Alex Dale and Amy Stevenson are both stuck, but in very different ways, in Seddon’s debut thriller. Alex is an alcoholic, having lost her husband, a baby, and her journalism job to addiction. She’s working on a freelance writing assignment when she meets Amy, who spent 15 years in a coma—conscious but paralyzed—following an attack by an older man when she was just 15 years old. Perspectives alternate between Alex, as she tries to solve the mystery of what happened to Amy and resurrect her own reporting career; Amy, as she relives the past and remains physically trapped in her present; and Jacob, Amy’s boyfriend at the time of the attack, who carries guilt about what happened to her. This well-paced tale takes some dark twists and turns, keeping readers guessing until the very end.

The Widow, by Fiona Barton
Barton’s debut asks a harrowing question: What would you do if your spouse was suspected of a horrific crime against a child? That’s precisely what Jean Taylor was faced with four years ago, when she was forced into the role of wife to a wrongly accused man. Though he was ultimately acquitted, the mystery of the little girl’s disappearance once pinned on him was never solved. Now Jean’s husband is dead, fatally struck by a bus, and reporters are trying to get the exclusive rights to her story. But what story will Jean choose to share? Suspenseful and intriguing, The Widow examines the dark secrets that can exist in a marriage.

Second Life, by S.J. Watson
Second Life is Watson’s second thriller, behind her bestselling Before I Go To Sleep, to offer up a thrilling mix of sex, murder, and mystery. Narrator Julia Wilding lives a comfortable, quiet life with her husband and their adopted 13-year-old son, Connor. But when Julia’s sister, Kate, is murdered in Paris, Julia becomes determined to find out what really happened—for her own sake and that of Connor, secretly Kate’s biological child. But soon Julia becomes entangled in Kate’s erotic online life, which stokes her own dark desires. Will she find out what happened to her sister, or will she lose herself in the hunt?

All the Missing Girls, by Megan Miranda
Miranda one-ups all the readers who flip to the end of a book first by starting her tale near the end of the story, and then backing up to tell the whole thing in reverse. Confused? You won’t be once you check out this gripping thriller, out June 28. It tells the story of two young women who go missing from the same rural town a decade apart. Nicolette Farrel left her hometown 10 years ago, after her best friend, Corinne, disappeared without a trace. The investigation at the time focused on suspects including Nic and the people closest to her. She’s the only one among them to have left leave their hometown, but now she’s back to care for her ill father. But when Annaleise, Nic’s neighbor and her crew’s alibi on the night of Corinne’s disappearance, goes missing herself, Nic suddenly finds herself thrown into a new mystery, as well as the ongoing mystery of what really happened to Corinne all those years ago.

Luckiest Girl Alive, by Jessica Knoll
Knoll’s bestselling debut paints a picture of a woman who has reinvented herself and left a painful, humiliating past behind. But how long can Ani FaNelli go on before her carefully resurrected facade of secrets and lies crumbles? And will it set her free or destroy her? Ani suffered as a teen at the hands of her fellow students at a prestigious private school, but now she’s re-created herself as a writer in New York with a wealthy and handsome fiancé. Then, a documentary about a violent incident at her former school brings Ani’s painful past crashing into her beautifully orchestrated present, forcing her to face some unfortunate truths in this twisty-turny thriller.

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  • Sadie

    The only one avail at my bookstore was Second Life (which should have tipped me off), and what a waste of time! The main character is just stupid, and becomes a damsel in distress – nothing like Girl on the Train. I have very little time to read, so I look forward to sitting down with a good book. I couldn’t even finish this one the main character was so lame and the story predictable. Now I’m not sure I trust these recommendations to try any others on the list!

    • Golden_Goddess

      Thanks to let us know! I read “Before I Go To Sleep” by the same author and was not a fan.

  • Tu-reed

    Very good list. I took the time to read most and like thus far. Anyone read A Girl Named Trouble by Fey Truet. If I can’t find any reviews I’ll download and review myself when finishdd with this list.

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