Customer Reviews for

1001 Ways to Market Your Books

Average Rating 4.5
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  • Posted March 15, 2012

    Out of date, self promoting, still has some value.

    As a former software executive, in charge of product development and even sales, I am not unfamiliar with the concepts of marketing. However, all businesses are different and the book business is a strange group of players, so I wanted to beef up on this.

    I will start with the Cons, but there are indeed pros:

    1) 600 pages of bullet lists. Yes, the world is used to bullet lists and short, rapid fire paragraphs for each bullet. BUT, this is a book, not a powerpoint presentation. Get some REAL depth once in awhile.

    2) Out of date. It does capture the fact that there is an Internet <grin>. It does not capture the eBook trend (not really at all). It does not capture that Amazon by the end of this year will control 70% of the ENTIRE N. American book market (including audio books). It does not capture trends by Apple, nor even Google. It does not, for instance, capture that the only big brick and mortar left is Barnes and Noble and they are struggling (what are the opportunities there?).

    3) I just get annoyed at too much self promotion, tooting of horn, pointing you to another place to spend your money. I know it is a reality of these kinds of books, so generally it can be ignored.

    4) Bias toward non-fiction. The types of promotions, cross marketing, and other activities that make up 60 % of this book are geared toward non-fiction. Lets put that to about 200 pages that apply to fiction. Still not terrible, but you do have to sift through it.

    5) Repetitive. Yeah, when teaching you tend to repeat. When reading I like to avoid it.

    6) Big publisher, single author, not much between.

    The "case studies" (more on that later) are talking about single authors, generally NOT self published (see "out of date" above) or publishers that spend "$1,125,000 on the rights to the book" then "$750,000 marketing budget." Yeah, I can market a book too, with that kind of budget.

    7) The advice is often simplistic. "Develop Brand Names" ... yeah...ok...don't give me a bulleted list of all the different books/companies that built a brand name and what that brand is. You had me at "brand name" ... discuss HOW to do that. On a budget! (There are thoughts presented in the book, to be fair, but still).

    PROS:

    There are significant pros to this. Three stars indicates more favorable than not.

    1) Good reference list. You can leaf through this and build your own targeted thought process. BUT, you should have some marketing experience already. Or product management. This is not really a HOW TO book, as is implicitly implied by the title. Think of this as a menu planner, not a recipe book for amateurs.

    2) It does have advice for publishers. That is what I was looking for. The advice is indeed high level, but it is a starting point.

    3) There really are not too many good books out there. This is almost necessary because of that. I am tempted to write my own (yeah, some decade when I have free time).

    4) It is possible to "translate" the ideas that are out of date to current world, but you have to think about it.

    5) I think the book makes clear that there are no silver bullets.

    6) There is fair emphasis on the long haul. This is good, too many people, companies, authors, expect instant success.

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