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Prime Obsession: Berhhard Riemann and the Greatest Unsolved Problem in Mathematics
     

Prime Obsession: Berhhard Riemann and the Greatest Unsolved Problem in Mathematics

4.6 7
by John Derbyshire
 

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In 1859, Bernhard Riemann, a little-known thirty-two year old mathematician, made a hypothesis while presenting a paper to the Berlin Academy titled  “On the Number of Prime Numbers Less Than a Given Quantity.”  Today, after 150 years of careful research and exhaustive study, the Riemann Hyphothesis remains unsolved, with a one-million-dollar

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Prime Obsession: Berhhard Riemann and the Greatest Unsolved Problem in Mathematics 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved 'Prime Obsession'. Many popular mathematical books try to simplify so much that the beauty of the underlying mathematics is not revealed. Derbyshire's skill is leading the reader patiently with the aid of many diagrams into the mathematics behind the Reimann hypothesis. I would have preferred a bit more mathematics and less of the historical and biographical background which is well known and readily available elsewhere. In particular I wish Derbyshire had had more to say on Mobius integration which is a key concept. Derbyshire advises the reader that several accounts of Mobius integration can be found on the Internet. Well, yes, but the authors of these accounts lack Derbyshire's explanatory skills. I have read other books on the Reimann hypothesis, but they always ducked away when the mathematics started to get difficult and left me disappointed. 'Prime Obsession' delivers. Highly recommended.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have to say, I have not enjoyed a math book this much since I read 'The Art of The Infinite' for the first time. This book truly captures the sheer joy of math for math's sake alone. One key point that is made is that math, unlike any other science, is not spured along by the needs of society at the time. Money and research are poured into facinating problems that may or may not have a real world application yet. Most other sciences see this persuit as pointless... but math... math is something else... it is artistic, and elegant. This book captures that elegance and puts it in terms that most folks with a decent background in math can understand. Do be warned though, you should have at least a decent background in a beginners level calculus course before you try to make heads or tails of this read. Otherwise, the later chapters will fly right over your head.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was written to give you math and the history of math on the topic of the reiman hypothesis. I love it when the author knows their subject!
Too many math topic books have the author appologizing about their lack of mathematical understanding, and saying boy if I cant get it then you surely cant understand it.... Well J Derbyshire does nothing of the sort. He gives you the scoop on the RH and gives you all the math you need to understand it.
I have read 3 books on the subject, and the other two were nothing like this one. If the topic has any interest to you, then you will enjoy this book immensely.