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1912: Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft and Debs -The Election that Changed the Country

Average Rating 3.5
( 7 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2006

    Recommended For Those Who Enjoy Elections

    I would have to agree with the other reviewers that the sub-title doesn't make much sense since every election effectively changes the country. But I did enjoy reading the work, although it is much more suited for people with a strong interest in history and politics.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2005

    Why is 1912 election imporant?

    The author spends little time going beyond the surface of his subjects. This causes each candidate to become a caricature. Roosevelt is the rebel, Wilson is the grumpy stuffed shirt, Debs is the crazy radical and Taft is the worthless incumbent. I had trouble getting through this book. The point that should have been the climax (the final weeks before the campaign and the election)are mere after thoughts. The author also doesn't adequately explain why the 1912 was so important. I think that's because it wasn't as much of a turning point as the inside cover claimed. The best part of this book is the final 20 pages after the election when the author explores the candidates lives after 1912. That was actually interesting. Sadly, much of the rest is dry and uninspired.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2004

    Not all there

    Yes, the election of 1912 sure was an exciting one. Unfortunately, readers wouldn't know that by reading Chace's book. The bare facts are what keep this story interesting, no matter how hard Chase tries to make it otherwise. I felt as if I were reading an unedited version. The writing was flat and confusing. Paragraphs were strung together randomly; sentences seemed misplaced. Facts were incorrect (e.g. TR won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1906, not 1910). So I'm not even sure I learned anything, because I am not sure if I can trust what I learned. The best part in the book is a thorougly exciting tale of the kidnapping and trial of Big Bill Haywood. The story stuck out of the book as if it were a previously published essay, finely tuned. It was the only part of the book where I couldn't wait for - rather than dreaded - the page turn. I definitely expected better.

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