Customer Reviews for

A Call to Arms: Mobilizing America for World War II

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2013

    I'm still getting through it. It's a long book. I am a fan of WW

    I'm still getting through it. It's a long book. I am a fan of WW11 history and the work is very detailed but takes a lot of time to develop. Acronyms need more clarification after first used. Does seem to move ahead a year and then back a year. Overall I find it very interesting as I grew as a child during this period. I've taken a break from it but look forward to getting on with my reading. Now just reading something lighter.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 3, 2014

    An excellent book on a fascinating topic. No war was more indust

    An excellent book on a fascinating topic. No war was more industrialized than World War II. It was won as much by machine shops as by machine guns. For example, during the war, we produced as many planes in one year as had been produced in all the pre-war years since the Wright brothers invented the airplane in 1903, combined. It was an astonishing industrial achievement.

    As William S. Knudsen of the National Defense Advisory Commission put it, "We won because we smothered the enemy in an avalanche of production, the like of which he had never seen, nor dreamed possible."

    Or, as Donald Douglas wrote, "Here's proof that free men can out-produce slaves."

    Mr. Klein's book is the comprehensive version of this great story. Three other books on the subject are also excellent (and shorter):

    - "Freedom's Forge: How American Business Produced Victory in World War II," by Arthur Herman
    - "Masters of Mass Production," by Christy Borth
    - "Why the Allies Won," by Richard Overy

    If you are interested in aircraft, I recommend:

    - "Climb to Greatness: The American Aircraft Industry, 1920-1960," by John B. Rae

    Enjoy this adventure into the greatest production job in history.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2014

    Woo

    Just read it

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2014

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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