Customer Reviews for

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

Average Rating 3.5
( 273 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(80)

4 Star

(73)

3 Star

(60)

2 Star

(31)

1 Star

(29)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Great Book!!!

I loved this book! It is so funny and really an enjoyable read. I love anything by Mark Twain because he puts such humor into potentially boring subjects. He really lightens up the whole King Arthur story. I would recommend this book to anyone I know. You must read this...
I loved this book! It is so funny and really an enjoyable read. I love anything by Mark Twain because he puts such humor into potentially boring subjects. He really lightens up the whole King Arthur story. I would recommend this book to anyone I know. You must read this book!!

posted by Anonymous on September 8, 2006

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Reasonable book, recommended.

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is a fairly non-standard book, not staying within the boundaries of what is usually considered 'normal' literature. Our story takes place, for the most part, in the ancient land of Camelot, where our main character wakes up fr...
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is a fairly non-standard book, not staying within the boundaries of what is usually considered 'normal' literature. Our story takes place, for the most part, in the ancient land of Camelot, where our main character wakes up from a nasty seizure. He is scheduled to be put to death the very next day by burning, but saves his skin because of his future knowledge. He tells the king that if he puts him to death that he will blot out the sun permanently, of course it was really just a solar eclipse, but they didn't know that. Once he becomes the second most powerful man in the kingdom by title, he sets out on a mission to modernize Camelot to nineteenth century levels. At the beginning of his rule, he builds many secret factories, and many secret telephone lines. Such inventions were kept from the public because he didn't want them to be viewed as evil magic and reject them, so he introduced them slowly over time. This method was reasonably successful. Getting on towards the end of the book, the church turned against him and ripped all his glorious changes apart, reverting the culture back to its backward state while 'The Boss' was out of the country. When he returned back to his position in Camelot, he found most everything torn to shreds. He took just over fifty of his best men to defend a little sand belt, waiting for the biggest battle to date. Who had won? The tens of thousands of knights, or the inventory and his fifty soldiers? Its your job to read the book and find out. Mark Twain seems to want to do quite a bit in the line of updating Camelot in this book, as well as expressing his opinions as to the state of the human mind's evolution. Maybe he should have spent a little more time writing this book, expanding upon his ideas in both respects. The book as a whole felt quite rushed. On the other hand, it is still a very entertaining book to read, and should give most anybody a good time. In my opinion, this book scores somewhere between three and four stars, as I do recommend it, but I have read better books.

posted by Anonymous on October 2, 2001

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 280 Customer Reviews
Page 2 of 14
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2008

    Book Review: A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

    I read this book for a class assignment. The assignment was to read a ¿classic book¿. The classmates got books like Robinson Crusoe, Alice in Wonderland, and The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. I picked A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. What I thought would be an easy read was by no means an easy read. I first opened it and thought: ¿I'm never going to get through this in two weeks.¿ It was tough until I got about 50 pages into it, then it was fairly smooth sailing. A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is about a middle-aged man named Hank Morgan who magically travels back in time from the 19th Century to A.D.528 Camelot. When he first gets there, he thinks he's in an asylum. When a knight comes to capture him and he says ¿Where's your circus?¿ . The author of this book is the famous author, Mark Twain. Twain, born on Nov. 30, 1835 has published over thirty books and many, many short stories, letters, and sketches. Some of Twain's most famous books include: Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer. His birth name was Samuel Langhorne Clemens and he got the nickname, Mark Twain from when he was a river pilot on a stem boat on the Mississippi River. Twain really was from Connecticut. He had four children. Another interesting thing about him is during the Civil War, he formed the Confederate militia known as the ¿Marion Rangers¿. The main characters in this book are: Hank Morgan, King Arthur, Clarence, and Demoiselle Alisande la Carteloise (Sandy). There are a few other big characters in this story to. Hank has the biggest part in the story and is also the one who tells it. He is a man from Connecticut during the late 1800's or the early 1900's. He loves his country and the modern technology of his time and when he magically lands in 528 Camelot, he realizes he can spread the ideas of the United States government centuries before they ever happen. He also ¿invents¿ the telephone, the telegraph and a few other things. King Arthur is the King of England. He is fair and generous. Hank says that even if he doesn't consciously mean to, the king always favors the lower social rank in a case against a higher ranking person. When the two go together on an adventure, Hank spends the whole day ¿drilling¿ the king on how to be peasant. Sometimes, he helps heal the sick. He is really honest. When he went with Hank to be a peasant, he obeys his own laws even if they force him to be a slave. The next character is Clarence. He is the young teenage boy in the beginning of the book who helps get Hank out of the dungeon and escape execution. Throughout the story, Clarence is the person who is the best friend of Hank and always gets him out of trouble. Once the newspaper gets going, Clarence is the best writer. The last main character is Demoiselle Alisande la Carteloise (Sandy). She is the one who goes with Hank on his quest to find all of the ¿ripe virgins¿ (princesses) that are locked up in a castle guarded by three one-eyed ogres. She never stops talking and is always full of stories. She is also very smart and she helps hank get out of some jams when he is in trouble. When Hank is captured, King Arthur puts him in the dungeon because people think he is a witch because of his (weird) clothes from the 19th Century. When he first gets to the town, he spots a thirteen year old boy named Clarence. When Hank goes into the dungeon, he remembers that there was a total eclipse of the sun on the day that he is supposed to be executed. So, he says if they kill him, he will ¿blot out the sun¿. When they see it start to get dark, they let him go. From then on he is known as a hero. He gets the nickname: ¿THE BOSS¿, and goes out and does ¿miracles¿ by using knowledge that any man from the 19th Century would know but knowledge that people from the 6th Century haven't learned yet. He talks numerous times about human nature and how minds of that time are ¿trained,¿ meaning that they are very superstitious and they believe pretty much eve

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2008

    An Amazing and Thoroughly Original Book

    A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is an incredible book. To anyone who is interested in reading a comedic, dramatic, and tragic story filled with adventure, romance, and explosions, I highly recommend it. To those who question its excellence: Did you know that FDR got the phrase 'New Deal' from this book? To this Sylvia I say read more carefully before you give negative feedback on a story you clearly didn't understand. And as to anonymous claims of plagiarism, get real! Do you honestly think that Haggard was the first to come up with that idea? With how much constant public scrutiny A Connecticut Yankee has been under since it was first published, how can you believe you're the first person to notice something like this? Someone obviously doesn't know what plagiarism is. Reading the other reviews here, I see that one of the greatest novels of all time has gone right over the heads of some of the people who try to read it. A final word to these simpletons: The book is not slow, your mind is!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2008

    A reviewer

    I did not enjoy reading this novel. It was not a positive experience at all. I thought that if i could make any changes i would change the time period that the Connecticut workman came from, instead of the 18079, i would make him come from the 2008, so instead of him thinking that he was intellectually superior to everyone else, he would actually be superior to everyone else. The author was not able to keep my interest because i am not interested in these types of books. The type of book is fantasy and i think that fantasy is boring because i like reading about things that could actually happen. I thought that the characters were pretty believable because i know people who think they are superior to others like the Connecticut workman. On a scale from one to ten, i would give this book a 3.5 for it to be understood by people with not that good of a vocabulary.

    0 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2008

    Okay book...

    This was a very interesting book. Interesting but i did not enjoy reading it. I did not enjoy reading it because it was a little confusing in the beginning then it got easier. The characters in this book were believable The characters were also VERY interesting. My favorite character is the narrator. Why is because he is very clever and cunning. How he is clever and cunning is by making everyone believe he can actually cast magic. In my opinion i think the author did a very good job of describing the characters. If i was to make changes in this book I would have made the chapters a little shorter and use less sophisticated words. What i gained from reading this would be a higher vocabulary . Why i gained that is because in the book the author uses words that i did not know yet.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2008

    This was a terrible book

    I wouldn't recomend this book to anyone, I just think its a waste of time and theres really no point to it at all. Reading something like this to me is very boring. The only way I can really see this book being helpful in anyway is if your doing a report for college on old English. Obviously the author was not able to hold my interest with this book. I just didn't find it exciting at all. If I could change anything in this book I would up-date the words so there not all old English and anyone can understand it. But one thing I learned by reading this book is that curiousity can take you a long way, and also stand up for yourself and be brave!

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2008

    A good book to read.

    This novel was alright to read. Mark Twain did make this book interesting and funny by putting in small laughing parts and some good views as to how a future person would see or try living in the medievile times. The book also contained a little bit of history with how knights wore their armor and how elaborate stories of dragons and great battles came into play with that time period. I found this quite interesting. Mark twain also did a good job at creating the characters and giving them a believable role. By reading the book i could get a good sense of how the medievil acted and talked. Also how the main character was very different from the rest, seeing that he was from the 1800's. towards the end of the book when the main character meets Morgan le Fay the story begins to beome a little confusing. This is mainly because the main characters sort-of friend Sandy starts telling all these stories about knights and it gets way into Old English language. Although, once or twice the story line gets funny when the main character says a word that Sandy finds funny and she says it over and over again. IN reading this book i didn't gain too much but, by reading the book it's given me a funny picture of how if someone from the future gets put in the same situation it would be hard to become accustom to past times.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2008

    Great Book

    I thought this book was very good. It has wonderfull satire. The main characters attitude is funny and has a classic self-relient New Englander way which is not everyones cup of tea. Its certaintly worth reading!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2007

    Mark Twain is a Plagiarist

    Let me start out by saying that I did enjoy this book as it was an exciting tale of adventure and wit. However I ceased to enjoy it after I read King Solomon's Mines (the greatest adventure and action novel I have ever read). In both books the main character/s know that an eclipse is about to occur and proclaim themselves wizards and magicians that can blot out the sun, so as to gain the respect and alligance of the primitive people who are hosting them. Literally the same exact thing happens in the two books even though the story is so different. Except King Solomon's Mines was published four years before Twain's ripoff. King Solomon's Mines is the better and more creative of the two books.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2007

    A Good Book

    This book was very fascinating and extremely interesting. I enjoyed every part, especially the entire idea of someone going back in time. Not to mention to King Arthur's Court!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2007

    Why in the world did Mark Twain write this book?

    This book was slow paced and dull. The entire thng is really about a man who is knocked out with a crowbar and has a dream about going back in time. It has the same rather disapointng feel as Alice in Wonderland when you find out she was only dreaming. I expected moe from the famed Mark Twain.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2006

    Fun!

    A fun imaginative adventure.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2005

    take a bow mr. twain

    take a bow and fall off the stage. this book was cleary not twains opus. i heard much praise over this bok porior to reading it, but as i trecked my way through the journey i realized it wasn't what it was cracked up to be. don't watse your time.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2005

    BBC

    Though Twain is acerbic in his criticism of technology that is inhumanely developed and applied, he also celebrates the American virtue of self-reliant ingenuity in countering the pretensions of medieval monarchy. Not surprisingly, his previously receptive English readership was not warm toward this book, and American readers who preferred his lighter touch in Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn were dismayed as well.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2005

    Twain's Best Work Yet!

    Twain was amazing when he wrote this book. ***** He deserves 5 stars. Mark Twain is not my favorite writer, but this book was awesome. I do recommend to anyone who like Twain, or even somebody just wants to take a try, you won't regreet it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2004

    What Bubby Says

    This book is about a New Englander who is knocked back into this 6th century world. Using is 19th century knowledge. He over comes the problems thrown at him. Such as the great Merlin. He manages to turn camelot into a up running functioning town. With phone lines,and school systems. Using the gullibleness of these 6th century people he gets them to think that he can do it all. Things that include him being a magical magcian. Having such powers that allow him to crete fire. So if your looking for a satire comedy about King Authur and camelot. Go to your local book store and prepare to be taken back to 6th century with your mechanical magian hank.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2004

    Wonderfully Descriptive!

    Twain outdid himself! In my opinion, Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn were rather tedious to read in relation to the grammer that he incorporated to add effect. In this tale however, Twain depicts the age of King Arthur remarkably well, adding little quirks here or there. Keep in mind that this book is not meant to be all that serious, in other words it is a comedy. I know that sounds strange coming from an author such as Mark Twain, yes, he always has some humor, but this is a full blown comedy. It is wicked funny though.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2003

    read this

    this hilarious story is the best ive read ***** it beets lord of the rings and harry potter down

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2003

    Great Example of Twain's Satire

    A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is an interesting book with many merits. Written in the latter part of Mark Twain's life, the book exhibits much of the biting satire that Twain is known for. Consequently, while there are many humorous parts of the book, these are overshadowed by Twain's bitter criticism of the Church, the feudal system, and humanity's tendency to resist change and progress. On the whole, however, the book is enjoyable, not only for the comedy that Twain is typically known for, but also for the social commentary and powerful observations and insights that he provides. Some disappointments in the book are the ending and some misplaced and skewed historical details.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2002

    Mark Twain Has Done It Again!

    He has always had a certain poignancy to his writing but this one captured my attention in a way that was totally different. I enjoyed the time-travel theme. Enjoy!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2001

    *~BORING~*

    I have never read a book so BORING in my life. i was forced to read it b/c of a summer reading lst. its about 700 pages. but feels like 100,000,000, etc..... omg Dont read this book !!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 280 Customer Reviews
Page 2 of 14