Customer Reviews for

A Measure of Disorder

Average Rating 4.5
( 51 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(36)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

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1 Star

(1)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

20 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

Reviewed by Candace Cunard for Teens Read Too

Eighth-grader Jenni Kershaw might not be part of the popular crowd, but she does well in school, has a few close friends, and lives a fairly normal life--that is, until everyone on her school science fieldtrip mysteriously falls asleep and wakes up in a different world....
Eighth-grader Jenni Kershaw might not be part of the popular crowd, but she does well in school, has a few close friends, and lives a fairly normal life--that is, until everyone on her school science fieldtrip mysteriously falls asleep and wakes up in a different world. The students decide to scout the land and look for some answers--or at least some edible food--and that's when Jenni encounters a "local," a dwarflike man who calls himself Crank and helps Jenni and the rest of her classmates understand the world to which they've been transported. In this world, called simply "Mother," Crank explains that there are different types of people born into specific roles. His people, for example, work with machines, another tends to animals, and others still are born fighters, explorers, or even spirits tied to particular elements. Crank offers to lead the students back to his village, where they are directed to continue on a journey to the capital city in hopes that someone there can help them understand their situation. They set out, but Mother is not always a kind world, and they are beset by marauding bands who injure some of their number and impede their progress. And that's not all--the students soon discover that living in this world is working strange changes on all of them, transforming them into different species found on Mother, and sometimes not for the best. Alan Tucker provides an engaging mix between the typical hero-focused quest story and a broader exploration of self-development. Although Jenni is the main character, and most of the story is told from her perspective, Tucker narrates portions of the novel from the perspectives of others, which helps to expose these characters' conflicted motivations. Once the initial group of students splits up, with some deciding to join with the powerful shapeshifter Mogritas who promises to help them develop their powers but possesses an ulterior motive for this generosity, the technique of jumping back and forth between perspectives increases suspense. Although the book got off to something of a slow start, with the characters trying to figure out why they'd been transported and what they were going to do about it, once the transformation of the students into Mother creatures began the plot really took off. The transformations allow Tucker to showcase the personalities of these very different characters, and although it could be confusing to keep track of the entire cast of students at all times, by the end I had a fair sense of who everyone was. The conclusion, while satisfying, leaves plenty of room for the next works in this series, and I'll be interested to see where Tucker takes this story next.

posted by TeensReadToo on January 28, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

KK

What in the world I just learned more about the book with the reviews than reading the book(I havent read the book YET).

posted by Anonymous on March 13, 2012

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Page 1 of 1
  • Posted January 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Candace Cunard for Teens Read Too

    Eighth-grader Jenni Kershaw might not be part of the popular crowd, but she does well in school, has a few close friends, and lives a fairly normal life--that is, until everyone on her school science fieldtrip mysteriously falls asleep and wakes up in a different world. The students decide to scout the land and look for some answers--or at least some edible food--and that's when Jenni encounters a "local," a dwarflike man who calls himself Crank and helps Jenni and the rest of her classmates understand the world to which they've been transported. In this world, called simply "Mother," Crank explains that there are different types of people born into specific roles. His people, for example, work with machines, another tends to animals, and others still are born fighters, explorers, or even spirits tied to particular elements. Crank offers to lead the students back to his village, where they are directed to continue on a journey to the capital city in hopes that someone there can help them understand their situation. They set out, but Mother is not always a kind world, and they are beset by marauding bands who injure some of their number and impede their progress. And that's not all--the students soon discover that living in this world is working strange changes on all of them, transforming them into different species found on Mother, and sometimes not for the best. Alan Tucker provides an engaging mix between the typical hero-focused quest story and a broader exploration of self-development. Although Jenni is the main character, and most of the story is told from her perspective, Tucker narrates portions of the novel from the perspectives of others, which helps to expose these characters' conflicted motivations. Once the initial group of students splits up, with some deciding to join with the powerful shapeshifter Mogritas who promises to help them develop their powers but possesses an ulterior motive for this generosity, the technique of jumping back and forth between perspectives increases suspense. Although the book got off to something of a slow start, with the characters trying to figure out why they'd been transported and what they were going to do about it, once the transformation of the students into Mother creatures began the plot really took off. The transformations allow Tucker to showcase the personalities of these very different characters, and although it could be confusing to keep track of the entire cast of students at all times, by the end I had a fair sense of who everyone was. The conclusion, while satisfying, leaves plenty of room for the next works in this series, and I'll be interested to see where Tucker takes this story next.

    20 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2012

    Very enjoyable.

    Still reading. This is probably a "teen" book, but it is an easy read and is keeping my interest.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2012

    awesome

    It is great

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2012

    OH EM GE!!

    Interesting..........621 pages.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2012

    Great!

    I really enjoyed this book! Full of fantasy and mystery you don't want to miss out.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2014

    Very original

    I have never read a book like it before. It was very well writen. And the story was unique

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2013

    Cupcake

    Iloved it

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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