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A Mormon in the White House?: Ten Things Every American Should Know About Mitt Romney

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  • Posted March 14, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Why Mitt Romney was Qualified to Run for President in 2007 - 2008

    In early 2007 California Law professor and syndicated radio talk show host Hugh Hewitt issued A MORMON IN THE WHITE HOUSE? 10 THINGS EVERY AMERICAN SHOULD KNOW ABOUT MITT ROMNEY. Romney (born 1947) had just finished his single term as Governor of Massachusetts and had announced a Presidential run. Hewitt argues two theses: (1) Mitt Romney's 60 years of experiences and achievements qualified him to be a good President but (2) Romney's active membership in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints would cause many Americans to withhold support. *** As biography, Hewitt located his subject in a thoroughly Mormon family one of whose ancestors had migrated from England to follow young prophet Joseph Smith while others trekked west to Salt Lake City, migrated to Mexico to found a polygamous community then returned to Utah. The Romney men and women had been toughened by persecution and overcome many challenges. Mitt's father, Mexico-born George W. Romney had turned around American Motors, been thrice elected Governor of Michigan, had run unsucessfully for President and was next a Nixon Cabinet member. Mitt's mother Lenore once ran for the U.S. Senate. Young Mitt participated in some of his father's political campaigns and imbibed from both parents a strong sense of an obligation to public service. *** We see Mitt Romney as relentless in pursuit of every goal he sets, beginning with courtship of wife Ann. The couple has five grown sons. *** Beyond family and 2 1/2 years of Mormon missionary activity in France (including preliminary immersion in French), Willard Mitt Romney's hard-wired thought processes in 2007 are portrayed as growing out of his double doctorate at Harvard in law and business (immersion in two types of "case study") followed by apprentice and executive years first at Boston global management consultant firm Bain & Company and then at the related company he founded and led, Bain Capital. By the time he was elected Governor of Massachusetts, Mitt Romney had embraced "the Bain Way" of turning troubled companies around, making them profitable, investing in them and making a great deal of money for himself and shareholders. He had earlier (1999 - 2002) honed those business skills in turning around the scandal-plagued, financially floundering 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City. Hugh Hewitt forcefully flags Romney's own account of organizing the 2002 Olympics in his book of 2004, TURNAROUND. *** It is clear from TURNAROUND that the ideas of his old boss Bill Bain and "the Bain Way" had long been embedded in Romney's professional DNA. Had he won the White House in 2008, he would have faced his greatest economic challenge to date in the wake of the collapse of Lehman brothers. Out would surely have come the Bain Way and its vaunted "Strategic Audit" approach to solving complex problems. *** Hewitt also argues that being a Mormon does not disqualify for the Presidency, any more than being a Free Mason (Washington), agnostic (Jefferson) or member of no church (Lincoln) ever did. But a sizeable minority pocket of Americans say they would never vote for a Mormon. *** Hewitt's perhaps overly long, notably rah rah pro Romney book is not at all a bad introduction to Mitt Romney, his family, his Mormon faith and his acquired competencies. It is still relevant in 2012 as Mitt Romney rides again in pursuit of the White House. -OOO-

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