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A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings of Martin Luther King, Jr.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2010

    The Real Story We Dont Hear

    Reading this story was like an adventure in its own. Having it wriiten by Martin Luther King jr. himself made it that much more easy to understand his struggle to be hard. This story goes far beyond his 'I Have a Dream' speach. sometime people dont think much of him, or that all he did was say some important speach. I used to be one of those people, but not since I read this book. MLK realy was extremely important to how our country is today and I think some people forget that. But I think that anyone who reads this book would realize how important he realy is.This book show MLK's strive and perseverence even when people didnt want to listen to him. This story is full of real documents, letters and speeches. people dipised MLK but that never stopped him. He persevered until he was known as a hero. The book briefly goes over the begining of MLK's life instead the story goes into detail of when Martin was a young adualt. The story took me back to a time where things were much different. People often forget about those time or dont want to look back back on them but they happened. by reading i learned how horrible the discrimination was back then. the book also explain discrimonation that took place with other nationalities.istrongly recommend this book to people that enjoy history because that exactly what this book has to offer.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2008

    Something Other Than 'I Have A Dream'

    The collections of speeches, sermons, interviews and letters contained in this book will allow all readers to understand that Dr. King was more than the 'I Have A Dream' speech. One comes away knowing that King's first speech at the Lincoln Memorial was in 1957 on the third anniversary of the 1954 Brown vs. Topeka Desegregation ruling. It also shows that some of Dr. King's words in 'I Have A Dream' also appeared in other speeches. If I remember correctly, the last paragraph of 'I Have A Dream' was the ending for another speech. Additionally, while politicians today are talking about the lack of health care for 47 million Americans, Dr. King was talking about the same subject in the mid-1960's, but it was 42 million then. Dr. King also spoke about the inadequacies of Medicare and Medicade. My favorite piece in the book, which I think was more prophetic than 'I Have A Dream' is his sermon entitled 'A Knock At Midnight'. In that sermon he talked about and warned that America was going a path of relative morality where right and wrong were based on what was popular or who was doing it. Another point he commented on was that the Black church was not playing it true role in religion or in the Civil Rights struggle. He noted that Black churches were focusing too much on size, emotionalism and class of its members, and not enojgh on what the Bible teaches. Look around us at the Mega Churches. Finally, he warned/encouraged Blacks to see themselves as successful in many roles. To see themselves in higher positions and not be afraid to vote for our leaders running for office. Unfortunately the generation he was talking to then was in their late teens and early twenties. Now we are in our 60's and guess what-exit polls in recent primaries for 2008 show that it is our age group that is reluctant and afraid to vote for Obama because we can not see a Black Man winning as President. Rather than seeing that their vote is not only historic it is a strategic vote, our generation feels that we are throwing our vote away. The worse that is wasted in the one that is not casted. Maybe like the Isralites-we must wander around in the wildness for one more generation-until this type of thinking is washed away. BUY THE BOOK. STUDY THE BOOK. It is great reading and a great reference.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2006

    Insight to a Struggle

    In only a short while, James M. Washington has pieced together some of the most important works of Martin Luther King while opening the public eyes to the constant struggle the Dr. faced. Not only the struggle to overcome the racial epithet that he was characterized with from the whites, but the struggle he overcame from his own race. As a reverend and public demonstrator, the more conservative blacks, who would rather have used the civil courts to diffuse social unrest rather than public demonstrations, despised him. However, because the system was so backwards, it was hard to come by justice. MLK is considered a classic hero because of his persistent strive for justice and ironically, in society, he was viewed as a threat. Which is why I choose this quote, which is said so near to the beginning, which is key because many of his speeches could be twisted to make him the enemy. 'And what the full-bodied reality of King should finally tell us, beyond all the awe and celebration of him, is how mysteriously mixed, in what torturously complicated forms, our moral heroes - our prophets - actually come to us.' What I liked about this autobiography is how the author flashed between his own perspective of MLK and the actual teachings and speeches of MLK. The reference to MLK¿s ¿I have a dream¿ speech (An actual speech given by MLK) can be referenced up to the philosophical teachings of modern philosopher Josiah Royce, who spoke about a ¿Beloved Community¿ (Something that the author adds as insight). Something I dislike about this book was how the author discussed such powerful themes of mostly race and gave many of the speeches and teachings that related to that, but at the end, started to add dialogues of how MLK started expanding his preaching¿s across seas to Vietnam. Then adding his own thoughts about how he was not nearly as successful. Alls that chapter did was weaken the entire book. Because these writings were so well pieced together, the end of this novel should just be taken out.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2008

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