Customer Reviews for

An Abundance of Katherines

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

43 out of 79 people found this review helpful.

Dftba

:) you would understand if u are a nerdfighter

posted by 8657509 on July 17, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

14 out of 44 people found this review helpful.

Dull

I was very disappointed by this book, since I loved Looking For Alaska. In my opinion, the book was really dull and predictable. It wasn't the whole "worst book ever," kind of thing, it's just not neccesarily in my top book selections.

posted by anaeday on April 11, 2009

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  • Posted July 17, 2011

    Dftba

    :) you would understand if u are a nerdfighter

    43 out of 79 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2006

    Courtesy of Teens Read Too

    If you had the opportunity to devise a theorem that could correctly predict the outcome of a romantic relationship, would you do it? If it worked, would you use it? Can it even be done? This is the problem plaguing Colin Singleton, recent high school graduate, nearly-former child prodigy, hopeful genius. Colin, you see, has a significant problem. He falls in love quite easily, which in and of itself isn't such a bad thing. The fact that all of his loves, nineteen of them to be exact, have been named Katherine can even be explained away by some form of twisted scientific method. What can't be explained, though, is why Colin has been dumped by all nineteen of those Katherines. When he's dumped by the love of his life, Katherine XIX, he finds himself in a bad place. He can no longer call himself a child prodigy, since he's graduated from high school. He's not a genius, because he's never come up with anything that will change the world. There's an empty place inside of him where his latest Katherine's love used to live, and he doesn't know what to do with himself. Until Hassan Harbish (Muslim, but not a terrorist) devises a way to get Colin out of his funk--a road trip. With no destination in mind, the two set off in The Hearse, Colin's car, and go where the road leads them. Where it leads them is a small town called Gutshot, Tennessee, where Colin gets the urge to see the supposed grave of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. It's also where the two meet Lindsey Lee Wells and her mother, Hollis. Not to mention where they get to live in a giant Pepto Bismol-pink house on a hill, interview employees of a factory that makes tampon strings, and eat Monster Thickburgers at the local Hardees. It's also the place where Colin decides to finish the Theorem of Underlying Katherine Predictability. Assign numerical value to different variables, plot it on a graph, and you'll be able to predict how long a relationship will last--and who will be the dumper, and who will be the dumpee. Except Colin forgot some pertinent information, like chance, and distorted memories, and the fact that love is never predictable. As Colin and Hassan learn a few things about life in the small town of Gutshot, we get to follow their journey of learning to grow up, to make a name for yourself, and how to matter as a person. I loved AN ABUNDANCE OF KATHERINES, even more than Mr. Green's previous book, LOOKING FOR ALASKA. That book won the prestigious Michael L. Printz award, and I won't be surprised if this book is nominated, as well. This story is funny, poignant, and informative. For example, if I hadn't read AN ABUNDANCE OF KATHERINES I would never have known that: 1) Fetor hepaticus is a symptom of late-stage liver failure where your breath literally smells like a rotting corpse. 2) The junior senator from New Hampshire in 1873 was Bainbridge Wadleigh. 3) There is absolutely no scientific proof that drinking eight glasses of water a day will improve your health. 4) Dingleberries can be anagrammed into see inbred girl lie breeds grin leering debris greed be nil, sir be idle re. rings ringside rebel and residing rebel. 5) Nikola Tesla did a lot for electricity before Thomas Edison came along and stole some of his ideas, and he also loved pigeons. 6) I still suck at math. Order this book today. It's great, you'll love it, and you'll actually learn stuff. Three for the price of one!

    39 out of 42 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 11, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Dull

    I was very disappointed by this book, since I loved Looking For Alaska. In my opinion, the book was really dull and predictable. It wasn't the whole "worst book ever," kind of thing, it's just not neccesarily in my top book selections.

    14 out of 44 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 23, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    An Abundance of Fun

    Witty, empathetic, and charming don't even begin to cover the beginning pages of this most enjoyable book. An Abundance of Katherines is the story of a young man named Colin who believes he is no more than a washed-up child prodigy who has been dumped by his girlfriend Katherine - for the nineteenth time. So, in order to recover from his broken heart, he and his Muslim friend, Hassan, decide to take a little roadtrip and wind up in Gutshot, TN where the coming of age story begins.

    I couldn't put this book down if I tried, and I often reread it just for fun. I can't get enough!

    14 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2007

    An Intellectual Comedy

    John Green has written a fantastically humorous book. The characters are very real and I found it easy to relate to them. Full of fun, infused with a few questions about mattering, and a whole lot of smart-aleck remarks, I made my friends read this or told them it was very worthwhile. For those with a great sense of humor, I especially recommend it!

    11 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2013

    Anonymous

    Did anyone else think it's funny how Hanks wife's name is katherine and this book is called an abundance of katherines and the main character is a very smart guy just like hank?

    10 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 7, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    HIL-arious

    Heehee, this books was so funny. However predictable it might have been, I loved it. It was refreshing and filled with interesting trivia. The characters were great and memorable.

    10 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 25, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Jennifer Wardrip, aka "The Genius" for TeensReadToo.com

    If you had the opportunity to devise a theorem that could correctly predict the outcome of a romantic relationship, would you do it? If it worked, would you use it? Can it even be done? This is the problem plaguing Colin Singleton, recent high school graduate, nearly-former child prodigy, hopeful genius. Colin, you see, has a significant problem. He falls in love quite easily, which in and of itself isn't such a bad thing. The fact that all of his loves, nineteen of them to be exact, have been named Katherine can even be explained away by some form of twisted scientific method. What can't be explained, though, is why Colin has been dumped by all nineteen of those Katherines. <BR/><BR/>When he's dumped by the love of his life, Katherine XIX, he finds himself in a bad place. He can no longer call himself a child prodigy, since he's graduated from high school. He's not a genius, because he's never come up with anything that will change the world. There's an empty place inside of him where his latest Katherine's love used to live, and he doesn't know what to do with himself. Until Hassan Harbish (Muslim, but not a terrorist) devises a way to get Colin out of his funk--a road trip. With no destination in mind, the two set off in The Hearse, Colin's car, and go where the road leads them. <BR/><BR/>Where it leads them is a small town called Gutshot, Tennessee, where Colin gets the urge to see the supposed grave of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. It's also where the two meet Lindsey Lee Wells and her mother, Hollis. Not to mention where they get to live in a giant Pepto Bismol-pink house on a hill, interview employees of a factory that makes tampon strings, and eat Monster Thickburgers at the local Hardees. <BR/><BR/>It's also the place where Colin decides to finish the Theorem of Underlying Katherine Predictability. Assign numerical value to different variables, plot it on a graph, and you'll be able to predict how long a relationship will last--and who will be the dumper, and who will be the dumpee. Except Colin forgot some pertinent information, like chance, and distorted memories, and the fact that love is never predictable. As Colin and Hassan learn a few things about life in the small town of Gutshot, we get to follow their journey of learning to grow up, to make a name for yourself, and how to matter as a person. <BR/><BR/>I loved AN ABUNDANCE OF KATHERINES, even more than Mr. Green's previous book, LOOKING FOR ALASKA. That book won the prestigious Michael L. Printz award, and I won't be surprised if this book is nominated, as well. This story is funny, poignant, and informative. For example, if I hadn't read AN ABUNDANCE OF KATHERINES I would never have known that: <BR/><BR/>1) Fetor hepaticus is a symptom of late-stage liver failure where your breath literally smells like a rotting corpse. <BR/>2) The junior senator from New Hampshire in 1873 was Bainbridge Wadleigh. <BR/>3) There is absolutely no scientific proof that drinking eight glasses of water a day will improve your health. <BR/>4) Dingleberries can be anagrammed into see inbred girl; lie breeds grin; leering debris; greed be nil, sir; be idle re. rings; ringside rebel; and residing rebel. <BR/>5) Nikola Tesla did a lot for electricity before Thomas Edison came along and stole some of his ideas, and he also loved pigeons. <BR/>6) I still suck at math. <BR/><BR/>Order this book today. It's great, you'll love it, and you'll actually learn stuff. Three for the price of one!

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 3, 2013

    A novel on understanding how the brilliant mind works. Though th

    A novel on understanding how the brilliant mind works. Though the novel &quot;The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time&quot; is way much better, this is still a good read. But Among John Green's works, The Fault in our Stars and Looking for Alaska tops the list.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Ugh! So boring...

    Okay, I know I cheated and probably shouldn't be writing a review because I haven't finished the book. And I'm really not wanting to either. It's really, really boring. I did read Looking for Alaska, and I did enjoy it. But, John Green really isn't a favorite author of mine. Since he is a guy author, I never really felt that I could connect with the characters or his stories. I don't know why. I don't want to be sexist or anything, I just have a hard time connecting with a male protagonist and writer. Therefore, I'm on chapter four and it's been soo boring. Omg, all he's done is moaned about Katherine-19 and how he's a genius and his friend shoved him into a car to start a road trip. All done with No emotion or tactful story. Now he and his friend is sleeping in their car at a gas station. I really don't see where this story is going. So, I don't know if I'm really going to read it, but if I change my mind I will edit this review. I wouldn't recommend wasting your time with this book.

    3 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    a very funny read!

    My mom and I read this to each other on the seven-hour long ride on the way home from Iowa a few weeks ago, and we were both in stitches laughing so hard! I love John Greene's writing style and subtle (or not) sense of humor. Colin and Hassan, the two main characters, are two teenagers you won't forget.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2012

    An Abundance Of Katherines By John Green, was an interesting sto

    An Abundance Of Katherines By John Green, was an interesting story about a boy that needs to find his niche. My impression of the book was a road trip story where they meet up and to me honestly, that was not different than any other story. In the beginning, Colin, the main character, was dumped by a Katherine(the reason for the title is that he only likes people named Katherine), and went on a field trip with his friend, Hassan. The just travel down to Tenessee and find a town where Hollis, and Lindsey take them in to work on a project for them, in return they get food and shelter. Colin begins to have a crush on Lindsey, but there is another Colin, Lindsey’s boyfriend. Lindsey dumps the other Colin, and you will probably realize what will happen next. I belive that the main character was belivable, as I once went under a personal experience where I got turned down by a girl, and decided to take a leave of absence. I belive that the main point of the story was that when you go on adventures, you meet interesting people and you should make the most of the moment(to be honest, that’s just a guess). I think this book would appeal to readers that like roadtrip-type stories. One last thing, I neither liked or disliked the book. It was an interesting plot, but even then the story was predictable and it was rather strong worded. I would give this book a 3/5.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 6, 2012

    DFTBA!!!!!!!

    French the llama, i love being a nerd and the amazing literature that comes with being involved with this amazing society. (:

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2012

    Exceptionally nerdy. DFTBA

    Exceptionally nerdy.
    DFTBA

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2012

    Got anagrams?

    A fun read, socialogically speaking....if you think about it. Best read in a chapter-a-day fashion to savor the brainy timbits.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 29, 2010

    An Abundance of a super great eureka journey!

    An Abundance of Katherines by John Green, which was published in 2006 had a lot of amazing stuff. The main characters: Colin Singleton, Hassan (Colin's best friend), Lindsey, and TOC (the other Colin) are all a bunch of unique and nearly spunky characters. It starts out with the current situation of Colin Singleton's life. He had almost everything he needed and wanted n life, except for 2 things: being a genius and his 19th ex-girlfriend, Katherine. Hassan, his best friend decides for him a road trip to go on in order for Colin to forget K-19 (Katherine the 19th). However, as they go on their road trip to the east they catch a billboard saying that the Archduke Franz Ferdinand lied resting in peace in "Gutshot", Tennessee. There they meet others, like Lindsey and TOC resulting in love problems and development, cheating, fighting, smart remarks/footnotes, and Eureka moments. The problem Colin faces is with his insight on trying to be a successful genius, being comfortable being dumped for the 19th time, and sticking (or at least trying to) stick up for the girl who he thinks he fell for. One can learn that if one figuratively has a missing piece broken off from inside of them and later received it back it can never fit the whole it left again. However, one can learn to grow a new piece and forgive why the old piece was missing, but never forget it. They can heal over time. John Green uses a lot of jokes through Hassan, using conflicting details and also using remarkable, smart notes and remarks through Colin Dingleton. This book has 228 pages up to the end of the appendix. I recommend it to all people who like to read something of a journey along with romance, comedy and eureka moments. I give this book a 5 star rating!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2008

    Really disappointing

    I really disliked this book, which I thought was weird since I really like John Green and enjoyed Looking For Alaska. The language the teens used was completely unbelievable, the main character was annoying and boring, and the characters were widely stereotypical. Plus it just really bugged me that the main girl just 'decided' to be popular one day... and *bam*, she was. The book had a good idea, but the execution was poor.

    2 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2007

    Very Good and Funny!

    This book about adolescent trials and tribulations is sure to have you in stitches throughout all of the pages. It is simple and heart-warming, and the humor is unmistakingly 18-19 year old boy-esque, but also sophisticated. I read this for a book club, and three of us ladies have taken to using a certain word from this book (you will know it when you read it). Great read- you won't be sorry you picked it up.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2014

    WTF

    I cant read anything but the sample! I bought the book twice and i still cant read anything except the sample? MAYBE IM DOING SOMETHING WRONG. But no, I just bought 20$ worth of Katherine! REDICULOUS

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2014

    Eh...

    I, in all honesty, was disappointed. I read this book for a book report assignment and found myself wishing I had chosen a book with a better plot. I couldn't enjoy the book that much because it has little direction and I felt like the ending tied up no loose ends whatsoever.

    Aside from all of that, the book wasn't that bad. After all, it is a John Green book. This is just not my favorite. There were parts I laughed out loud at, and parts where I just really appreciated the writing.

    Although, I couldn't help but notice the similarities between this book, Paper Towns, and Looking For Alaska...

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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