Customer Reviews for

The Accidental Billionaires: The Founding of Facebook: A Tale of Sex, Money, Genius and Betrayal

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Great insight to a pivotal company

As you've come to expect from Ben Mezrich, this is a great window into a world that not everyone knows about. Whether Mark stole the ideas or enhanced his own will always be an issue but Ben puts all the cards on the table and lets you decide. Great unknown facts abou...
As you've come to expect from Ben Mezrich, this is a great window into a world that not everyone knows about. Whether Mark stole the ideas or enhanced his own will always be an issue but Ben puts all the cards on the table and lets you decide. Great unknown facts about Facebook and another well written book.

posted by McAusland on July 15, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

It must've been a disappointment to Mezrich, not talking to Zuckerberg...

I hadn't read any of Mezrich's earlier books, though they are extremely popular in Boston, due to the MIT angle for Bringing Down the House. I expect that some of his earlier work was easier to complete, since he had the cooperation of the people he was profiling. In th...
I hadn't read any of Mezrich's earlier books, though they are extremely popular in Boston, due to the MIT angle for Bringing Down the House. I expect that some of his earlier work was easier to complete, since he had the cooperation of the people he was profiling. In the case of this book, Mezrich could not get Mark Zuckerberg to go on record. Since the book is about Zuckerberg's (and others') accomplishments in establishing Facebook, I'd have to say that must have been a big disappointment to Mezrich, since it gave his story a one-sided feel.

The bulk of the story rested on the testimony, I guess you could call it, of Eduardo Saverin, Zuckerberg's initial financier, sounding board, and moral support while Zuckerberg was at Harvard. Zuckerberg subsequently found ways to ditch people he felt were feeding off his creation, including Saverin. I guess what struck me most was the juvenility of everyone involved in the whole process. They were only college kids after all, but somehow one hopes that those with exquisite gifts also have exquisite sense. Unfortunately, we all know that is not true--witness Tiger Woods. If you ever wondered if sex makes the world go round, look no further than this book.

When I was first exposed to Facebook, I must admit I was awed at its reach. But this story of its founding makes me uneasy. Not that I think Zuckerberg stole anybody's idea. After all, he not only had unique ideas, he could do the programming himself, something many others could not do. But he doesn't sound like the kind of person anyone wants to have as a friend. Zuckerberg's reluctance to speak for himself could be just a desire to let his creation speak for him, a shrug at what readers think of him, a fear that the writer would not give him a fair shake. Whatever it is, he probably doesn't feel like he needs to justify himself. Shrug. He certainly doesn't care what I think, and how lonely can a billionaire be?

posted by TheReadingWriter on April 18, 2010

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  • Posted July 15, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great insight to a pivotal company

    As you've come to expect from Ben Mezrich, this is a great window into a world that not everyone knows about. Whether Mark stole the ideas or enhanced his own will always be an issue but Ben puts all the cards on the table and lets you decide. Great unknown facts about Facebook and another well written book.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 18, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    It must've been a disappointment to Mezrich, not talking to Zuckerberg...

    I hadn't read any of Mezrich's earlier books, though they are extremely popular in Boston, due to the MIT angle for Bringing Down the House. I expect that some of his earlier work was easier to complete, since he had the cooperation of the people he was profiling. In the case of this book, Mezrich could not get Mark Zuckerberg to go on record. Since the book is about Zuckerberg's (and others') accomplishments in establishing Facebook, I'd have to say that must have been a big disappointment to Mezrich, since it gave his story a one-sided feel.

    The bulk of the story rested on the testimony, I guess you could call it, of Eduardo Saverin, Zuckerberg's initial financier, sounding board, and moral support while Zuckerberg was at Harvard. Zuckerberg subsequently found ways to ditch people he felt were feeding off his creation, including Saverin. I guess what struck me most was the juvenility of everyone involved in the whole process. They were only college kids after all, but somehow one hopes that those with exquisite gifts also have exquisite sense. Unfortunately, we all know that is not true--witness Tiger Woods. If you ever wondered if sex makes the world go round, look no further than this book.

    When I was first exposed to Facebook, I must admit I was awed at its reach. But this story of its founding makes me uneasy. Not that I think Zuckerberg stole anybody's idea. After all, he not only had unique ideas, he could do the programming himself, something many others could not do. But he doesn't sound like the kind of person anyone wants to have as a friend. Zuckerberg's reluctance to speak for himself could be just a desire to let his creation speak for him, a shrug at what readers think of him, a fear that the writer would not give him a fair shake. Whatever it is, he probably doesn't feel like he needs to justify himself. Shrug. He certainly doesn't care what I think, and how lonely can a billionaire be?

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 7, 2012

    Average book, confusing at times

    In the book Accidental Billionaires by Ben Mezrich, the motif of greed is both an obstacle and a necessity for Mark Zuckerburg on his summit to the top of success mountain.
    The summary of Accidental Billionaires is all centered on Zuckerburg’s often “bratty” attitude and relentless love for the world of computers and hacking into the forbidden treasures that many would possess. Zuckerburg got his reputation of a “jerk” when he made a website all by himself to help rate girls on their attractive qualities. He forwarded the link and what used to be the “hot or not” website rapidly transgressed into what is now known as Facebook. This novel emphasizes the troubles and obstacles that got into Zuckerburg’s way. The most crucial hindrance that Zuckerburg encountered was the problem of his best friend and how he betrayed him to achieve maximum profit and success.
    In Accidental Billionaires, Mezrich’s diction helps paint a picture for the reader to invasion the event-filled road for Zuckerburg to get where he is today. Not only does diction assist the reader in imagery, it also helps Mezrich get his point and story across in a fluid way. By looking through Eduardo Saverin’s perspective, Zuckerburg’s best friend during college, the reader can really get a grip on the life and personalities Zuckerburg would preform everyday. Through the vivid imagery of Mezrich, the reader benefits heavily from it and can achieve the upmost happiness during the reading.
    This book has gotten the reputation as a “false” told story but it still falls under the umbrella as a non-fiction novel. Although this book helped establish the foundations for the major motion picture about Zuckerburg and Facebook, I would state how this book is very confusing and often hard to follow completely. There are many characters in this novel and the majority of the time the reader has no idea who is speaking. Mezrich does do a phenomenal job at multiple variations of syntax, which helps personify the speech and jargon of the students and everyone else involved. Alternating the short and complex sentence structure is significant in really understanding the complexity of Zuckerburg’s mind.
    Overall, Accidental Billionaires is a book that I would recommend; however, this novel does have parts that may be confusing and language and imagery that may not be suitable for the whole community. The motifs and diction make this book unique and a must-read for any person who loves to be relished with the mysteries behind what Facebook has become today.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 6, 2011

    Very Interesting Read

    Although it does not cover all the aspects of how social network makes their money, it gives the user an insight of how we are making ourselves and all of our networks available for sale. The book is an exquisite insight on how Facebook began but it fails to give concrete formula on Facebook business model. And this is true for most books that talk about how any particular company makes money. Since most authors do not have access to the inside day-to-day economic activities of the companies. As well most of this book assertions are based on speculations, which makes it hard to be used as a valid source.
    Otherwise the book is an interesting read about the development of Facebook as company. If one is looking to learn about how Zukerberg developed his business model I will recommend looking somewhere else. At the end it remains an exciting read and just like the title indicates, the moneymaking part seems more accidental than from an invention of a visionary business model.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 20, 2011

    Engaging writing style based on speculation

    This is a great book that is easy to read in a day or two. It is definitely based on impressions and speculations, so not exactly a good reference book. However, the way the book is written allows the reader to be there at the time and the place where the idea came into fruition, and the book tags the reader along the various stages of the development of FB. It is inspiring to all idea-creators and motivating for all entrepreneurs. Truly, there is a world out there that is willing to embrace new ideas that are meant to make our life experience a better one. I haven't seen Social Connection and I don't think one needs to - this books alone is very entertaining and very well-written. Recommended.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 4, 2011

    ok

    Entertaining and interesting to see how this company began

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 14, 2011

    not as good as the movie but...

    if you can seperate the film from the book then this is an enjoyable read which gives an interesting view into the creation of an internet behemoth.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 20, 2009

    Fun read

    Fascinating, well-researched story - from the "accidental" initiative to the seemingly not-so-accidental duplicity. A must read in particular for any college student - including those that I teach - lamenting the decline of the media given the new potential for opportunities. Couldn't put it down.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2013

    &star Hawkmoon

    I hate forcematers....

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2013

    Life is short yolo

    This book sounds quite promising,until you read the first word. Worst book ever. End of story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2013

    Sky go eat your dang worms

    Yummy

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2013

    Sunclan

    We accept most cats who are approved by Quickstar, our leader. We are at wuthering heights second result.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2013

    Waterclan autumnclan evilclan jewelclan blazeclan

    Wc
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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2013

    AshClan

    AshClan! I want it to win August 29th.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2013

    Wolfclan//Fillyclan

    Wolfclan tomorrow. Fillyclan in two days.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2013

    Sunclan

    Leader rockstar win today

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2013

    Gergostars prophecy whole book

    Gergokit becomes a apprentice then gergotail then deputy then leader

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2013

    Gggrrr

    Chris if u r my friend that i now plz tell me im not trying to get w u i just wanna know

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2013

    Chris

    I'm using my name Chris I'm thete

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