Customer Reviews for

Across the Endless River

Average Rating 4.5
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted November 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Interesting Historical

    In Indian culture, the ocean was called "the endless river" as no one ever sailed across it. Thad Carhart explores the life of Jean-Baptiste Charbonneau, who was the baby born to Sacagawea on the explorations of Lewis and Clark, where she served as a translator. Because of this connection with Americans, Jean-Baptiste grew up with connections both to his Indian heritage, the French trapping culture of his father, and the American/English culture. Sacagawea died when Baptiste was eight, and he lived after that with Captain Clark, who treated him as a ward and provided him with an education. There, he met and grew to know a German nobleman, Duke Paul of Wurttemberg. Paul is in America to satisfy his longing to make a name for himself as a natural history scientist. Baptiste is invaluable to his efforts, serving as a guide and helping him capture various wild animals.

    When Paul returns to Europe, he convinces Jean-Baptiste to go with him. What is meant as a short journey ends in Jean-Baptiste staying as Paul's guest for five years. He learns about European royal culture and it's strict structure for every part of life. During these years, Baptiste learns about royal hunting, familial expectations, music, art and various scientific studies. He also forms relationships with two women. One is a young widow, Theresa, who is Paul's cousin and who starts a friendship with Baptiste that turns into an affair. He also forms a relationship with the daughter of a wine-merchant to European nobility. Maura is half French and half Irish, and understands better than anyone else the way that Jean-Baptiste feels balanced between two opposing worlds.


    Thad Carhart has done extensive research into this man's life, and it is evident in his writing. One of the strongest examples is the contrast in hunting. The reader is taken along on an Indian hunt for buffalo, and this writing is exciting and compelling. When Baptiste goes to Europe, this hunting, which is done for survival, is contrasted with the very formalised hunt performed by the noblemen, where one animal is selected, his moments traced, and he is harried to exhustion and then executed. Another example is Carhart's writing of the ceremony that young Indian men underwent to become braves. It is a chilling ceremony, and the reader is transported into the smokey, loud tent in which the ceremony occurs. The contrast in European culture is the stylized dance that Baptiste attends, where all moves are structured and there is a definate pattern to every stage of the evening. This book is recommended for lovers of historical fiction. I enjoyed getting to know Jean-Baptiste, and I think others will also.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 8, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    excellent historical fiction

    This was an excellent, well-written work of historical fiction and I was very excited to read anything that takes place in Paris. This is not a part of history that I am familiar with, so besides enjoying a wonderful novel, I also learned a little, too!

    For me, the story really took off once Jean-Baptiste got to Europe as I don't have much interest in American history. But I enjoyed reading of Baptiste struggle between two very different worlds, Europe and early America. Baptiste is also torn between two woman. I really felt connected to Carhart's Baptiste and the novel flowed smoothly and was a fairly quick read once I got into it. It did take about 60-70 pages to get there, but I think that background was important to understanding Baptiste. I also enjoyed the descriptions of Europe and Paris especially. This was a really great read.


    my rating 4/5
    http://bookmagic418.blogspot.com/

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 25, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Great Read

    This is the story of Jean-Baptiste Charbonneau, the son of Sacajawea. Baptiste was born 1805 during the time his parents were with the Lewis & Clarke expedition. When he is 18 yrs. old he goes to Europe and helps Duke Paul catalogue the objects he acquired on his travels. He meets and falls in love with two woman, Paul's cousin Theresa, and Maura Hennesy. The story is written so that you feel as if you are there. It's got both American and European history and I loved learning from this book. My favorite character was Baptiste. I was intrigued by him and his place in history. There is so much more to this book, but I feel that the more I reveal, the more I will take away from your experience if you decide to read it yourself. It is an adventure you won't soon forget.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1