Customer Reviews for

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Norton Critical Edition

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

8 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

Great Work

Twain initially conceived of the work as a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer that would follow Huck Finn through adulthood. Beginning with a few pages he had removed from the earlier novel, Twain began work on a manuscript he originally titled Huckleberry Finn's Au...
Twain initially conceived of the work as a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer that would follow Huck Finn through adulthood. Beginning with a few pages he had removed from the earlier novel, Twain began work on a manuscript he originally titled Huckleberry Finn's Autobiography. Twain worked on the manuscript off and on for the next several years, ultimately abandoning his original plan of following Huck's development into adulthood. He appeared to have lost interest in the manuscript while it was in progress, and set it aside for several years. After making a trip down the Mississippi, Twain returned to his work on the novel. Upon completion, the novel's title closely paralleled its predecessor's: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade).
Unlike The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn does not have the definite article "the" as a part of its proper title. Essayist and critic Spencer Neve states that this absence represents the "never fulfilled anticipations" of Huck's adventures-while Tom's adventures were completed (at least at the time) by the end of his novel, Huck's narrative ends with his stated intention to head West

posted by 6440558 on January 5, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

18 out of 29 people found this review helpful.

Pass for a Better Version

The story is a classic but this e-version was not the worst nor the best. There are funny breaks and odd fonts randomly placed through the story. It is worth looking for a better e-version.

posted by AnnFerguson1 on January 10, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2013

    Northernstar

    Todayi call starclan down opoun us to witness the making of a warrior! Spottedpaw, your warrior name shall be Spottedfeather! Congradulations!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2012

    Good read

    Good but it was confusing because the copy wasnt very good

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2011

    AMoofmoofmoof probuction

    Kool i know right

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 25, 2011

    :(

    4got 2 save spot

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 21, 2011

    Boring at the begining then it got intresting later on and kind of hard to understand because of the slang

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2011

    Highly Recommended

    This book was the best book i read and most interestion one. It was a very good attention grabber.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 4, 2011

    difufjjv

    i have not read it but im relaited to the guy who wrote it

    1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 2, 2011

    huck finn

    this book is awesome must read

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 6, 2011

    An interesting book

    Huckleberry Finn is a complex book with a difficult to understand plot. Huck Finn is in the western canon of literature and is taught in schools around the country primarily because of its writer, Mark Twain. Twain is a writer with a complex personality. In his books, Twain is able to incorporate his life by adding his personal opinions on very controversial topics to his books. Though it is often hard to pick out which side Twain takes, his opinion is in his books, which in turn makes Huck Finn harder to understand. If you enjoy picking out small themes and symbols in books, Huck Finn is for you. If not, you can try to read it, but you proabably will end up wishing you had your money back. On the other hand, if you have to read it for school, then this is definitely the copy to purchase.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2011

    it freaking sucks

    thebaurthor is so dumb

    1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 3, 2011

    awesome

    best book ever!!!!!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2011

    Excellent Book with Extensive Additional Materials

    Highly recommended

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2011

    American Classic - THE Great American Novel

    This was just as fresh as I remember reading more than 20 years ago. A true American classic.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 10, 2011

    huck finn

    very good but hard to understand!!!!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 27, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A fine book, but...

    What is this doing in the SF/F section?

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2010

    Good Book

    5 stars

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2005

    An Interesting, Yet Good Book!

    I enjoy the books by Mark Twain, generally, but this book was a little different. I'm not saying i didn't like it, but it was different. The story was great but, at times i got a little bit confused because the author kept rambling on and on and on about semi-irrelevant things. I recommend it but it wasn't my favorite. Also, the part where Tom Sawyer comes in is a little boring and it seems to drag a bit. It is a good book to read for a book report or something like that!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2004

    Read during summertime for eternal youth

    I never read this book as a child, so I thought I might be too old to appreciate it. But I discovered a world that is open to all--young and old. Huckleberry Finn is a masterpiece; its as American as a novel can get (in a good way). I was so wrapped up in the world of the Mississippi River and the nineteenth century that i felt like a kid all over again. Its the perfect summertime read, its a realistic fantasy that sweeps you away to a place where the writing is perfect and the imagery idyllic.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 6, 2002

    A Great Adventure Book

    Huckleberry Finn. By: Mark Twain ¿A Great Adventure Book¿ This story takes place in the states of Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. These were three southern states; during the time of slavery. This was around the 1800¿s. The main characters are Huckleberry Finn, a thirteen year-old boy who goes on an adventure and tries to live alone. The other main character is Jim, a runaway slave who accompanies Huck on his adventure through the various states of the south. The plot of this story is that a young thirteen year-old boy named Huckleberry Finn who¿s father, the town drunk, is trying to steal his six-thousand dollar treasure and abuses him when he gets drunk. His plan is to escape one night to an island close to where he lives. Once he gets to this island he discovers he isn¿t alone on his island. This where he meets Jim, the runaway slave, and lets him come down the river with him on the raft. He then went in to town to withdraw his money and he went into a woman¿s house to find out where the bank was in a girl¿s dress as a disguise and got caught so he told the truth and she let him go. He went back and told Jim what had happened and that they needed to go. On the fifth night when they passed St. Louis there was a storm and a steamboat crashed on a rock and Huck wanted to check it out so he decided to pull the raft up to it and take a look. Once on the boat they heard voices in the dark so Huck decided to check it out, but Jim thought it would be better to get to the raft, and fast. Huck soon found out that there were men trying to kill someone for some sort of treachery or greed. Then Huck went to find the raft and it was gone, so they took the criminals boat and got away. Then they went to look for their raft and loaded the money they found on their boat on the raft and left for land. The next morning Huck went to get berries and encountered two men each with a fat, over-stuffed carpetbag. They cried out,¿ Help, save us! We¿re being chased by men and dogs for no reason.¿ Huck took them to the raft and they joined them in their adventures. When on the raft the younger man says he is of royalty and later that day the older of the two admits to royalty also and they get in a fight that results in a competition for power on the raft. Soon they forgave each other and things were O.K. again. After their little bout they set off again. Soon upon arrival in a new city the ¿king¿ and his ¿duke¿ made plans for a huge scam. They immediately rushed out to advertise and preach. They set up for a play called ¿The Royal Nonesuch!¿ It did fit it¿s name, all it was was the king butt nude with stripes on his body pretending to roar. Then to cover up they told them to not be idiots and to let their friends come and be fooled. The last night they left on the spot and left the people with rotten foods. Then after barely escaping their graves they try to hitch a ride on a steamboat and meet a child on the banks waiting they take him and he tells the king what he¿s doing and where he¿s going. The king finds he is going to a funeral. They then decide to go and fake the brothers. When they get there they find the daughter¿s home and go. They say they are her uncles and they are here to pay homage to their dead brother. They get in, unpack, and go to bed. The next morning they go through with the ceremony and a man accuses them of lying and not being his brothers. He asks them what kind of tattoo he has on his chest, and before they could answer the real brothers walk up and say they are the real brothers and that their baggage just came before they did. The fake ¿brothers¿ left. Then Huck goes to the city to find Jim who was gone. Then he goes to Jim¿s plantation and tries to blend in. He meets Tom Sawyer and his family and they plan to free Jim. Tom thinks up a devious way to spring Jim and they do it on a heavily guarded night and Tom gets shot in the leg, so he calls a doctor and he goes to the island they left to and Huck

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2002

    Masterful Reading...

    I was mesmerized for about 7 hours. This was the best read audio book I have ever heard.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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