Customer Reviews for

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

10 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

Great book and story.

I purchased this book for my daughter because her school has banned this book along with several others from both the public and private school systems here in the good 'ol US of A.
Many of my daughters teachers repeatably asked me to not purchase this book because thi...
I purchased this book for my daughter because her school has banned this book along with several others from both the public and private school systems here in the good 'ol US of A.
Many of my daughters teachers repeatably asked me to not purchase this book because this book represents free thought and wasn't politically correct.
ARE YOU KIDDING ME? IT'S MARK TWAIN...
Yeah the good 'ol suppression is alive and well here in America... :(

posted by mopheen on October 12, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

To: about n word

Um....ya you shouldn't tell people how to spell if you can't even spell yourself! And 'swar', well if that's supposed to be "swear", well you spelled that wrong, too. And 'witch' is "which"! And it's "quiet", not 'quit'. Plus in the way that you used "quiet", you should...
Um....ya you shouldn't tell people how to spell if you can't even spell yourself! And 'swar', well if that's supposed to be "swear", well you spelled that wrong, too. And 'witch' is "which"! And it's "quiet", not 'quit'. Plus in the way that you used "quiet", you should have used "silent" instead. So get better in spelling!

posted by 10901475 on March 8, 2012

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  • Posted March 27, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I'm finding out I wasn't too smart in High School

    I stopped reading this book and failed the test at school, it was just too boring. I'm ashamed of myself reading it now. This time I was able to see it more real, if that makes any sense. You have to read the book to understand why it is so good. Because you have to spend the time watching the situations he is in, but then seeing the same situation through his eyes.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 18, 2010

    great short s tory

    great classi c.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 3, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    t

    t

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 5, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Huck and "N" word Jim

    This captivating story about a uneducated boy named Huck takes you on a thrilling roller-coaster ride through souther Missouri. Mark Twain did a phenominal job. He really expressed the ignorance of Southern people when it comes to slavery.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 31, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    great read

    this is a great book for anyone wanting to look for an adventure story. well worth the money.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2009

    Great reading on many levels

    This is a classic that should be read by youth and by adults, lots of fun.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 12, 2009

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: a schoolbook for students to both enjoy and learn from.

    Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has long been a favorite of teachers, students, and parents-to both enjoy and criticize. Even after over a controversy-filled century in print, this timeless novel holds a much deserved reputation as one of the finest works of American literature.
    The story centers on a poor, rascal of a boy, Huck Finn, who is forced to leave his "home." With nowhere in particular to go and no responsibilities tying him down, Huck embarks on a journey floating down the Mississippi River on a raft. However, a carefree existence never completely materializes for Huck, as he comes across a variety of obstacles throughout his voyage. Perhaps the most trying tribulation Huck encounters is when he meets an escaped slave, Jim. This poses both a moral and practical dilemma-Huck becomes close friends with Jim, and would like to help him escape from bondage. However, in Huck's antebellum South, this is illegal, and even the uncivilized Huck deals with immense guilt over the prospect of committing such a heinous crime. Additionally, if their plot is discovered, both would be in prodigious trouble with the law. All of the secrecy and deception merely adds to the fun for both the reader and the young, mischievous subject.
    This text is important both for the innovations it presented at the time it was first published, and for its continued meaning today. Although the book has been criticized in modern times for its use of racial slurs and for being, in general, politically incorrect, these aspects merely reflect the historical nature of the novel. The lessons it presents on judgment and racism, on doing what is right, love, and friendship will forever resonate with generations of new readers. The ability of a reader to lose him or herself along the path of Huck's adventures, get caught up in the honesty of his emotions, and chuckle at the numerous demonstrations of Twain's uniquely wry wit contribute to the lasting positive impression of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 29, 2008

    Great book

    For starters this is a great book and I would recommend it to anyone who likes adventure. Now that that¿s out of the way, this book is set just before the civil war era, in Missouri and on the Mississippi river. Mark twain uses a great dialect and vocabulary in this book, it really brings you back to the time the book was wrote, and paints a vivid image of what the scene would look like if it were a movie. Although the vocabulary is very good I would get an audio tape of this book unless you are very good at pronunciation, because some of the speech is southern and not always spelled right to give you a feel for how the characters are supposed to talk. There is very much racist language so if your offended by that, this book maybe not the perfect book for you, there is a lot of use of the ¿N¿ word, which can scare off some people. Mark Twain does a brilliant job of depicting what it must have been like in those times. This book could almost be used for a middle school U.S. history class because of its historical accuracy about New Orleans, slaves traveling to the north in hope of freedom, and the education system and how many people viewed it. This book does have some softhearted spots as well, as the friend ship between Huck and Jim develops. As the story progresses you start to see more and more of Tom Sawyer influence Huck, how he creates these outrageous stories and tricks people and he even mentions many times that is what tom would have done, which I find strange because through out the whole book tom is involved very seldomly. To bring this review to an end, if words scare you probably not the best book choice, but if you like to read, love adventure, or just looking for something to read because you have to for school this is an all around great book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 15, 2008

    The Adventures of Huckleberry finn by Mark Twain

    The book "Adventures of Hucklebery Finn" is a very intersting and suspenceful book with many toching sences. This book is about Huckleberry Finn, a poor boy with a drinking father that has no job, and his friend Tom Sawyer, a middle-class boy with a crazy magination that found a robber's stash of gold. As a result of his adventure Huck got a part of that. Huck also became adopted by Widow Douglas. I like this book because it shows how much Huck was trying to put in effort in his life. He changes by his manners and how now he goes to school and church. But Tom is off to no good that leads into trouble. This book is very good and I hope the next reader injoys it as much as i did.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2007

    Hucklberry finn

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is about a young boy who is in search for freedom and adventure the book is based by Mississippi river . Huck is kidnapped by his drunken father he kidnaps his son because he wants six thousand dollars from him. Huck received six thousands dollars from the treasure that him and Tom Sawyer found. Huck finally get away from the deserted house in the middle of nowhere and gets a canoe to get off the river. Instead of going back to the town he runs away he is tired of the people and laws of the town. He meets a guy named Jim Ms. Watsons slave and they spend many days together traveling down the river. Both in the search for freedom. While Huck and Jim travel down the river they have many adventures and have many long talks they become best friends. They stole a lot of things from the house and find a wrecked ship and get mixed up in murders. They get separated after a steam boat hits their canoe. Huck has a run in with the Grangerfords and the Shepherdsons two families at war with each other. They they meet the king and duke and get in a good deal of trouble performing plays the king and the duke pretend to be Peter Wilks long lost brothers from England and try to steal all the money left in his will. Huck finally gets rid of them but is left to search for Jim who gets sold by the King. He ends up at Tom Sawyer's Aunt Sally's house, where Tom and Huck rescue Jim. Through all of the adventures down the river, Huck learns a variety of life lessons and improves as a person. He develops a ethics and truly feels for humanity. The difficulty of his character is enhanced by his ability to relate so easily with nature and the river

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2007

    A reviewer

    Despite a slightly boring beginning, this book proved to be a very good read. Some parts are a little bland, but the overall story had a lot of humour, meaning, and 'suspense.' There were several small twists in the novel that added to the adventure and made this a truly enjoyable book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2007

    One of Mankind's greatest works of art

    It is a classic, and it so for a reason. It is relentlessly funny, imaginitive, and especially witty. I was astounded at the multitude of modern-day values and progressive ideas that reigned throughout the novel, particularly regarding equality and oppression. I have never had quite so much fun reading a book... It makes me wish i could go back and do my childhood all over--the way it was supposed to be done. Risk and adventure are the soul of childhood, as well as this novel.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2007

    Ultimate tale of friendship!

    This story defies all odds and the present gov't when Huckleberry Finn travels with his runaway slave friend, Jim, down the Mississippi River to - who knows where. One helps the other, then the other helps the one, but both are friends regardless of color, or law, or any other outside stimuli, which is the way it should be. Friends are friends no matter what!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2007

    Amazing!

    I am a 7th grader and I read this last year {in 6th grade} with my class. Mark Twain is a genius. Some of the terms he uses for different races are not politically correct today, but were back then. Mark Twain is amazing, what he writes about is simple to understand when you just glance over it, but when you actually think about it, he has so many hidden, deep, and intriguing points. This is a great book I recommend it if you like to think, and are good at thinking.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2007

    Americana

    I find the footnotes in these B&N classics helpful. They add missing information when I'm unfamiliar with the context. There's a big difference, however, between Dante's Inferno and Twain's Huckleberry Finn. Things have changed much from Dante's time. The history of the family feuds in Italy reference and satirized in The Inferno were totally unknown to me. The footnotes in Twain's work are mostly unnecessary. That's probably true for most American readers. The references are not esoteric, the language is still in use. Most everything is quite understandable as written. The controversial racial slurs, while annoying to today's sensitized audience, do not necessarily mark the book as racist. Often Twain's use of them underscore his irony. I imagine that even a reader from Twain's time who was used to hearing them casually slung about, could not help but see the sarcasm. One point, though, might be considered questionable and that is the ending. In this story, Tom would not have been a hero if he had actually broken the law to set Jim free. He's a hero because of the way he took Huck on a ride when he knew all along that Jim was free. That Tom, such a prankster. Today's audience would prefer to see Tom break the law because freedom for any slave is justified under any circumstance. Back in Twain's time that probably would not have been the case. You simply did not question the law back then. If it was a law, it was just even if it was obviously unjust. That was one of the problems facing people from that time. They could not accept an anti-hero. These days, we love them.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2006

    Great book

    Even though it is quite difficult to understand because of the accents of the characters,this is a great book.It has been criticized because of its presumed racism,however I think this was only caused because of poor understanding of the book since the smartest character in the book is black(Jim)and racism isn't actually about racism or slavery.This book features five major themes:Loneliness,superstition,birth and rebirth,religious hipocresy and freedom.We can see that Huck Finn is a great person in a really messed up society we can see that when Huck goes 'Ok i'll go to hell'when he decides to help Jim escape from the Phelps plantation.Overall,great story,that shows us the very racist society of Twain's days and the way human beings can be evil to one another.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2006

    Adventure of Huckleberry Finn Review

    The unforgettable classic wild adventures of Huck Finn¿s treacherous trip down the Mighty Mississippi vividly draws the picture of true friendship and the strength it gives to overcome racial boundaries as Mark Twain spilled his humorous insightful imagination on each page. As Huck Finn travels the Mississippi with Jim and other colorful characters he learns the values of friendship and the perils of the real world during his journey. This book wonderfully depicts life during the 1800¿s through the open mind and mischievous child like character of Huck Finn yet because of Twains humorous writing style a dull moment can never be found throughout the book. Twain¿s excellent persona of a young child helps readers see the world viewed through a child¿s eyes. The bond between Huck and his best friend Jim is the true essence of Twain¿s message in the text as one will see the unbreakable chain that not even the strongest oppression and overwhelming fear can break. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a must read for any person, its humorous style, rich characters, and moral message will send the idea of human acceptance for all no matter what era or person that any reader can relate to in his or her own life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2006

    Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a classic example of a bildungsroman that focuses on the growth and progression of the young protagonist Huck. Twain¿s satirical approach and style adds more significance and depth to his criticisms toward society. By giving examples that display weakness in society, Twain can more easily communicate the faults that he believed needed to be changed. The story begins with Huck being civilized and taken care of by a widow. He is uncomfortable being civilized and it is against his nature to be limited by the confines of society. Huck is taken from the widow and returned to his abusive and drunk birth father. Huck escapes from his father and takes refuge with Jim, an African American slave traveling on the Mississippi to gain his freedom who coincidentally was a slave owned by the widow. This is the beginning of the story of Huck¿s development. As time progresses, Huck finds himself more accepting of Jim. This communicates Twain¿s main underlying message that it is a natural belief untouched and unchanged by what is socially acceptable that all men are created equal. This is because the only people who believed discrimination against blacks was immoral was Huck and Tom Sawyer. This shows that the two children, void of society¿s influence, had the most reasonable ideas compared to others who had already been molded by society. Twain went against society¿s beliefs when he wrote the story that discrimination was inappropriate in all cases. I give The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn five stars because this is one of the original ¿coming of age¿ novels and has the most appropriate message for the time period.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2006

    This is a good book

    I like the book The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. There is lots of adventure, lots of action, and the book always keeps you guessing. Huck is always on some kind of adventure and on all of his adventures there is lots of action. Also the book always keeps you guessing so it makes it hard to put down. I think that the book The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a great read for someone who likes adventures.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2006

    Good book

    If you like Mark Twains writing style you will enjoy this book. The book is quite short, so it is a good book for siting in your favorite chair and forget your troubles after work.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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