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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Average Rating 4
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(293)

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(116)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

Great book and story.

I purchased this book for my daughter because her school has banned this book along with several others from both the public and private school systems here in the good 'ol US of A.
Many of my daughters teachers repeatably asked me to not purchase this book because thi...
I purchased this book for my daughter because her school has banned this book along with several others from both the public and private school systems here in the good 'ol US of A.
Many of my daughters teachers repeatably asked me to not purchase this book because this book represents free thought and wasn't politically correct.
ARE YOU KIDDING ME? IT'S MARK TWAIN...
Yeah the good 'ol suppression is alive and well here in America... :(

posted by mopheen on October 12, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

To: about n word

Um....ya you shouldn't tell people how to spell if you can't even spell yourself! And 'swar', well if that's supposed to be "swear", well you spelled that wrong, too. And 'witch' is "which"! And it's "quiet", not 'quit'. Plus in the way that you used "quiet", you should...
Um....ya you shouldn't tell people how to spell if you can't even spell yourself! And 'swar', well if that's supposed to be "swear", well you spelled that wrong, too. And 'witch' is "which"! And it's "quiet", not 'quit'. Plus in the way that you used "quiet", you should have used "silent" instead. So get better in spelling!

posted by 10901475 on March 8, 2012

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Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 293 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2007

    Ultimate tale of friendship!

    This story defies all odds and the present gov't when Huckleberry Finn travels with his runaway slave friend, Jim, down the Mississippi River to - who knows where. One helps the other, then the other helps the one, but both are friends regardless of color, or law, or any other outside stimuli, which is the way it should be. Friends are friends no matter what!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2007

    Amazing!

    I am a 7th grader and I read this last year {in 6th grade} with my class. Mark Twain is a genius. Some of the terms he uses for different races are not politically correct today, but were back then. Mark Twain is amazing, what he writes about is simple to understand when you just glance over it, but when you actually think about it, he has so many hidden, deep, and intriguing points. This is a great book I recommend it if you like to think, and are good at thinking.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2007

    Americana

    I find the footnotes in these B&N classics helpful. They add missing information when I'm unfamiliar with the context. There's a big difference, however, between Dante's Inferno and Twain's Huckleberry Finn. Things have changed much from Dante's time. The history of the family feuds in Italy reference and satirized in The Inferno were totally unknown to me. The footnotes in Twain's work are mostly unnecessary. That's probably true for most American readers. The references are not esoteric, the language is still in use. Most everything is quite understandable as written. The controversial racial slurs, while annoying to today's sensitized audience, do not necessarily mark the book as racist. Often Twain's use of them underscore his irony. I imagine that even a reader from Twain's time who was used to hearing them casually slung about, could not help but see the sarcasm. One point, though, might be considered questionable and that is the ending. In this story, Tom would not have been a hero if he had actually broken the law to set Jim free. He's a hero because of the way he took Huck on a ride when he knew all along that Jim was free. That Tom, such a prankster. Today's audience would prefer to see Tom break the law because freedom for any slave is justified under any circumstance. Back in Twain's time that probably would not have been the case. You simply did not question the law back then. If it was a law, it was just even if it was obviously unjust. That was one of the problems facing people from that time. They could not accept an anti-hero. These days, we love them.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2006

    Adventure of Huckleberry Finn Review

    The unforgettable classic wild adventures of Huck Finn¿s treacherous trip down the Mighty Mississippi vividly draws the picture of true friendship and the strength it gives to overcome racial boundaries as Mark Twain spilled his humorous insightful imagination on each page. As Huck Finn travels the Mississippi with Jim and other colorful characters he learns the values of friendship and the perils of the real world during his journey. This book wonderfully depicts life during the 1800¿s through the open mind and mischievous child like character of Huck Finn yet because of Twains humorous writing style a dull moment can never be found throughout the book. Twain¿s excellent persona of a young child helps readers see the world viewed through a child¿s eyes. The bond between Huck and his best friend Jim is the true essence of Twain¿s message in the text as one will see the unbreakable chain that not even the strongest oppression and overwhelming fear can break. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a must read for any person, its humorous style, rich characters, and moral message will send the idea of human acceptance for all no matter what era or person that any reader can relate to in his or her own life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2006

    Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a classic example of a bildungsroman that focuses on the growth and progression of the young protagonist Huck. Twain¿s satirical approach and style adds more significance and depth to his criticisms toward society. By giving examples that display weakness in society, Twain can more easily communicate the faults that he believed needed to be changed. The story begins with Huck being civilized and taken care of by a widow. He is uncomfortable being civilized and it is against his nature to be limited by the confines of society. Huck is taken from the widow and returned to his abusive and drunk birth father. Huck escapes from his father and takes refuge with Jim, an African American slave traveling on the Mississippi to gain his freedom who coincidentally was a slave owned by the widow. This is the beginning of the story of Huck¿s development. As time progresses, Huck finds himself more accepting of Jim. This communicates Twain¿s main underlying message that it is a natural belief untouched and unchanged by what is socially acceptable that all men are created equal. This is because the only people who believed discrimination against blacks was immoral was Huck and Tom Sawyer. This shows that the two children, void of society¿s influence, had the most reasonable ideas compared to others who had already been molded by society. Twain went against society¿s beliefs when he wrote the story that discrimination was inappropriate in all cases. I give The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn five stars because this is one of the original ¿coming of age¿ novels and has the most appropriate message for the time period.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2006

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    this book is a really good adventure book if you like adventure books that also kinda make you laugh read this book today!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2004

    Great Book!!

    Huckleberry Finn is a great classic for all people. I recommend this book to anyone who has to read a classic.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2004

    The best of the best

    One of the great American books , the one Hemingway thought unbeatable. The life of the book is in its colloquial language, great characters and story. This is a book about childhood for children, and not for children , a book about growing up , about life on the Mississippi, about dreams and fears, about friendship and the human heart overcoming schoolbook social false morality. What I have written gives nothing of the flavor of the tremendously warm and humorous book, written by America's greatest humorist. The best of the best. Enjoy it and reread through your life at different intervals as with all the great works.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2003

    One of Twain's Best!

    This story is an amazing wonderful classic. You will never get bored reading this! (not if you know how to read anyway...There are no pictures:-)...My parents read this book to me as a child and I read it to my children and now to my grandchildren. It's a terrific memory for all of us

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2003

    THE GREAT AMERICAN NOVEL

    I first read Huckleberry Finn in my teens(I am now 42)and I have continued to enjoy it at least once a year since then. I realize that there is controversy surrounding this novel, and outright movements to ban it. Twain puts down on paper the feelings and emotions of people of many divergent backgrounds, and gives us a taste of what life might have been like in the late 19th century. You might not like some of the dialogue, but a good novel forces you to deal with issues that may be unpleasant.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2003

    Awesome

    Read any book or story by Mark Twain and you will automatically have gained some extensive knowledge about subjects spanning personal life, to street smarts, to pure by the book intelligence. Samuel Langhorn Clemmons is by far one of the most brilliant men to ever put a pen to paper, and using his pen-name, Mark Twain, has conveyed his intelligence through stories in a way that allows every person that reads them to become wiser just from reading them.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2003

    True dipiction of a lost time

    This book is timeless. Even though it was required reading I would have read it on my own eventually. Mark Twains' interpretation and use of local color of the setting made the reader feel as though they were reliving the 1800's. It might be a challenge to understand but its worth it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2003

    Always a pleasure

    This is one of the few books that I never tire of reading, over and over again. If I don't glean a new nugget on a re-reading, a previously discovered 'truth' is refreshed. This is one of those glorious adventures that you read for the pleasure of the moment and do not care to reach the end. There is no better climax than the pleasure of the immediate moment.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2014

    Trying to escape from a society that wants to civilize him, Huck

    Trying to escape from a society that wants to civilize him, Huck Finn takes off on a raft down the Mississippi river with an unlikely alley a run-a-way slave Jim. On his way down the river Huck decides he’s going to help Jim escape and struggles over his views on morality along with the views on morality in the society around him. This book is frequently challenged for racism which is the exact opposite meaning of this entire novel. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a satire of slavery and racism. The uses of racial slurs throughout the entire novel are historically accurate and not used with a negative connotation. Those who speak against the novel and wish to see it banned are under the incorrect notion of a “deeper racism” (Source F) said to be poorly hidden in the novel. These people argue that “Jim [is] no more than Huck’s sidekick” (Source F). Who “finds his purposes subordinate to Huck’s, [but] he never minds” (Source F). However the one time in which Huck treats Jim as less then himself Jim does mind. In Chapter 15 when Huck played a cruel trick on Jim for Huck’s own entertainment Jim stood up for himself saying “ ‘Dat truck dah is trash; en trash is what people is dat puts dirt on de head er dey fren’s en makes ‘em ashamed’ ” (Twain 80). Then Jim walked away clearly caring about his own purposes. Huck did not blow off Jim’s feelings because Jim was not viewed as a sidekick but as a friend. So Huck apologized and thought “I didn’t do him (Jim) no more mean tricks, and I wouldn’t done that one if I’d knowed it would make him feel that way” (Twain 81). Later Huck lies to some men hunting down run-away slaves to keep Jim safe in chapter 16, and in chapter 31 cries over the loss of Jim when The Duke and King sold him. Huck even says “‘All right, then, I’ll go to hell’” (Twain 195) in order to save Jim from slavery. Actions like these are not the actions of undertone racism but of friendship even if Huck is morally confused and conflicted by slavery; banning this book will only lead to the removal of a great novel which satires racism and slavery throughout its entirety.

    Source F
    Smiley, Jane. From “Say It Ain’t So, Huck.” Harper’s Magazine January 1996. 62-64.

    Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. New York, N.Y.: Barnes & Noble, 2003.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2014

    Carries bio

    Looks: black hair. Blue eyes. And honey skkn
    Likes: soccer & swimming & volleyball & choir & cheer
    Friends: Danny, panda, hunter, gokun, wld, jessica, jenn and, mia. Seth
    Dislikes: cheaters
    I serves snack (mostly cookies) at rdom times

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2014

    Jayces bio

    I look like becky g and zendaya i do dance and gymnasyics i also do soccor and b ball i like to meet people and i love nice boys im really tan and tall and thin im also a mottel and i sing really good and im popular but im sweet and sensitive

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2014

    #prettygirls bio

    Name- none of ur buissness
    Age-14
    Im tiny but strong
    Dont me me mad...youll regret it
    I have dirty blonde hair which i hate
    Blue eyes
    Im skinny
    I have an amazing boyfriend. I LOVE HIM SOOOO MUCH!!!!
    I love little kids and i want to be a teacher.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2014

    Haleys bio

    Name: haley(hannah)
    Age:16
    Personality:get to know me.
    Looks:long brown curly hair an brown eyes, skinny; tan an short

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2014

    Kileys bio

    Looks: brown hair that is shoulder length i wear contacs and im 5"3 age:15 live: minnespta status: in a relationship with my handsom devil drake. Umm likes: some sports my bf animals and hangin with friends dislikes: bullys anything else just aask ;.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2014

    Allana bio

    Im allana athendon. Im 21 irp. Im a school teacher and have long brown ringlets snd bright snappy blue eyes. My personality is quiet and shy...but i do have a temper. Im fierce but only when needed. My ma ans pa died when i was seven and ive been on my own ever since. : )

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