Customer Reviews for

After Tupac and D Foster

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Reviewed by Grandma Bev for TeensReadToo.com

Woodson's engrossing story contains a lot of big issues, but the main theme is about friendship, and how unexpected changes come into our lives as we are touched by others.

AFTER TUPAC & D FOSTER is a tension-filled story of how two twelve-year-old girls meet ...
Woodson's engrossing story contains a lot of big issues, but the main theme is about friendship, and how unexpected changes come into our lives as we are touched by others.

AFTER TUPAC & D FOSTER is a tension-filled story of how two twelve-year-old girls meet an outsider and become friends with her. "D" is a foster child, and has adopted "Foster" as her last name. Abandoned by her mother, D Foster is searching for something that is missing in her life...perhaps a sense of belonging and permanence. The other two girls begin to explore the city with her, all of them searching for their "Big Purpose" in life. All the girls have their own set of family issues, and their own approach to solving these problems.

All three girls are great fans of the rapper, Tupac Shakur, and are dismayed when he is shot. They examine the meaning of his rap lyrics as they apply to their lives as African-Americans living in Queens, New York, and find that they have much in common with his ideas.

When D's birth mother shows up to reclaim her daughter and take her out of the lives of the other two girls, you can't help but hope that her life will be better this time -- while fearing that it will be a rerun of her past history.

Racism, homosexuality, and incarceration are touched upon in this slice-of-life story. Every teen can find something to relate to in this emotional story of how teens cope with life. There isn't a great deal of suspense, but Ms. Woodson's writing style is absorbing, and makes you wish the story was longer. It does give you cause to reflect on how your own friends and acquaintances have changed your life.

posted by TeensReadToo on October 26, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

After Tupac and D Foster from Adrian Salome - LMS #4

"After Tupac and D Foster" is a very interesting book to start my summer reading. I was very amazed when I first read the book because of the real facts. I would really recommend this book to a friend or someone who likes to read novels that are fun and interesting. I e...
"After Tupac and D Foster" is a very interesting book to start my summer reading. I was very amazed when I first read the book because of the real facts. I would really recommend this book to a friend or someone who likes to read novels that are fun and interesting. I enjoyed the book because it was what could really happen to three friends that have a lot of common between them. Once I started to read it I was stared with the details, characters and settings. This is one of the greatest novels I have ever read. It has a lot of drama like when they found out that D's mom was a white women and her friends where very shocked . Also when Tupac got shoot twice and he went to the hospital and survived twice and then he went to jail for touching a girl's behind. Therefore Tupac didn't have that much luck the next time and he died.
But then they realize that D's got more freedom than her friends. I would like to read another book from her like " The house you pass on the way" that is about Evangeline meets her adopted cousin Trout and they learn about each other and what they like and what they don't like and they help each other. Then I would like to read the book of "Lena " that when things get to bad in home Lena and Dion escape and go out to the road dressed like boys so things would be easier. I really think people should read this book because it's interesting and very fun reading.

posted by 1838355 on August 30, 2009

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  • Posted October 26, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Grandma Bev for TeensReadToo.com

    Woodson's engrossing story contains a lot of big issues, but the main theme is about friendship, and how unexpected changes come into our lives as we are touched by others. <BR/><BR/>AFTER TUPAC & D FOSTER is a tension-filled story of how two twelve-year-old girls meet an outsider and become friends with her. "D" is a foster child, and has adopted "Foster" as her last name. Abandoned by her mother, D Foster is searching for something that is missing in her life...perhaps a sense of belonging and permanence. The other two girls begin to explore the city with her, all of them searching for their "Big Purpose" in life. All the girls have their own set of family issues, and their own approach to solving these problems. <BR/><BR/>All three girls are great fans of the rapper, Tupac Shakur, and are dismayed when he is shot. They examine the meaning of his rap lyrics as they apply to their lives as African-Americans living in Queens, New York, and find that they have much in common with his ideas. <BR/><BR/>When D's birth mother shows up to reclaim her daughter and take her out of the lives of the other two girls, you can't help but hope that her life will be better this time -- while fearing that it will be a rerun of her past history. <BR/><BR/>Racism, homosexuality, and incarceration are touched upon in this slice-of-life story. Every teen can find something to relate to in this emotional story of how teens cope with life. There isn't a great deal of suspense, but Ms. Woodson's writing style is absorbing, and makes you wish the story was longer. It does give you cause to reflect on how your own friends and acquaintances have changed your life.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Loved it!

    Ms. Woodson makes us fall in love with her characters. They become your family and your friends. She makes you ache for them when they are sad. She makes you want to protect them when they are in danger. Like family, you love them despite their failings and sometimes because of them. Thank you for giving me a glimpse into another reality so removed from my own yet not really all that different. I recommend this book to adults as well as children. A wonderful book to read in the classroom.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 20, 2011

    So good

    I will want to read this

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 21, 2011

    d lives after 2pac

    set in the 90s pac was still alive d foster makes friends yet 2pac is her idol just like me and help too bad theres ni stories like this is a must for anyone

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    After Tupac and D Foster from Adrian Salome - LMS #4

    "After Tupac and D Foster" is a very interesting book to start my summer reading. I was very amazed when I first read the book because of the real facts. I would really recommend this book to a friend or someone who likes to read novels that are fun and interesting. I enjoyed the book because it was what could really happen to three friends that have a lot of common between them. Once I started to read it I was stared with the details, characters and settings. This is one of the greatest novels I have ever read. It has a lot of drama like when they found out that D's mom was a white women and her friends where very shocked . Also when Tupac got shoot twice and he went to the hospital and survived twice and then he went to jail for touching a girl's behind. Therefore Tupac didn't have that much luck the next time and he died.
    But then they realize that D's got more freedom than her friends. I would like to read another book from her like " The house you pass on the way" that is about Evangeline meets her adopted cousin Trout and they learn about each other and what they like and what they don't like and they help each other. Then I would like to read the book of "Lena " that when things get to bad in home Lena and Dion escape and go out to the road dressed like boys so things would be easier. I really think people should read this book because it's interesting and very fun reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2009

    After Tupac and D Foster from Adrian

    After Tupac and D Foster is a very interesting book to start. I was very amazed when i first read the book because it was interesting.I would really recommend this book to a friend or someone who likes to read novels that are fun and interesting. I liked the book because it was what could really happen to nthree friends that have a lot of common between them. but then they realize that d's got more freedoom then her friends.
    I would like to read another book from her like " The houseyou pass on the way" that is about Evangeline meets her adopted cousin Trout and theylearn about each other and sexy what they like and what they dont like and they help each other. Then i would like to read the book of " Lena " that when things get to bad in hohme Lena and Dion escape and go out to the road dressed like boys so things would be easier.
    I really think people should read this book because its really interesting and very fun to read. Once i started to read it I was very amazed with thje details, characters and settings. This is one of the greatests novels i readit has a lot of drama like when they found out that d's mom was a white mom and her friends where very shocked .

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2013

    Loved this book but confsed ....

    Did D die in the end ?

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  • Posted August 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Another great Woodson book

    Woodson, as always, delivers a profound story in a short and beautiful way. She has this talent of keeping you interested in the story itself while showing you the light and dark sides of life that many people face on a regular basis. All of the characters seem real, and you come to love them throughout the narrative, especially D, who is often so mysterious in one moment and deeply candid in the next that you feel both intimidated and comforted by her presence simultaneously.

    Also, as always, Woodson integrates challenging subplots, like Neeka's older brother, a young gay man who's been wrongfully imprisoned, young Black men disappearing off the street and in jail for what seems like no reason, and the despair surrounding the death of Tupac. It wasn't until after having read this book that I truly understood even a small portion of the gravity of Tupac's life and what he represented to the African American community at large (a little personal thanks to Woodson for touching on that theme).

    In many ways, Woodson seems to be a YA Lit representation of Toni Morrison or Alice Walker. It's not surprising that she keeps winning awards for her texts. They're the perfect balance of engaging and enlightening with a unique voice and excellent literary quality. I recommend this book to readers 12+.

    -Lindsey Miller, www.lindseylibrary.com

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  • Posted April 13, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    After Tupac & D Foster

    Woodson, J. (2008). After Tupac & D Foster. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons.

    9780399246548

    Woodson uses beautiful prose to share the experiences of the narrator, Neeka and their new friend D, who is in foster care. They maintain their friendships as they experience life in their neighborhood and have discussions about friends and family. The three girls feel a special connection to the famous rapper Tupac Shakur as they grow to become teenagers. Time flows as a backdrop and the various experiences of Tupac being shot, imprisoned and reemerging serve as some of the strongest markers of time.

    The tensions of After Tupac & D Foster are subtle. Most of them are shared through conversations on the girls' front stoops in Queens as they consider discrimination, boys, the justice system, their families, Neeka's homosexual brother and their own futures.

    The character voices are strong and thought provoking. Woodson manages to touch on a bit of the academic theory of Deconstruction (my fave!), with understandable descriptions. But I did feel that the characters' search for their Big Purpose was lost throughout most of the story.

    Activities to do with the book:

    A teacher could take this book in several different directions. If a teacher were using this book with younger middle grade students, he or she could emphasize the girls' search for their Big Purpose and connect it to other stories, like The Higher Power of Lucky, while still having discussions about race, gender, family and education. This would be a good book to show how a writer can say a lot with a few seemingly simple descriptions.

    On the other hand, although the protagonists are only 13 at the end of the text, it deals with issues that are relevant to teens. If a teacher wanted to emphasize the treatment of African Americans by the justice system, the book could be paired with Myers's Monster.

    Other more general options include exploring Tupac's life and poetry or the treatment of homosexuality, gender, deconstruction, having a friend leave, and family in the 1990s.


    Favorite Quotes:

    "D Foster showed up a few months before Tupac got shot that first time and left us the summer before he died. By the time her mama came and got her and she took one last walk on out of our lives, I felt like we'd grown up and grown old and lived a hundred lives in those few years that we knew her. But we hadn't really. We'd just gone from being eleven to being thirteen. Three girls. Three the Hard Way. In the end, it was just me and Neeka again" (p. 2).

    "Maybe, while he was in jail, Tupac started thinking about his Big Purpose. That's what D called it-our Big Purpose. She said everybody's got one and it's just that we gotta figure out what it is and the go have it" (p. 7).

    "Me and Neeka had bought matching jean jackets with white stitching on the pockets for when school started and we'd worn them that day with these brown velvet pants we had. We'd walk up and down the block thinking we were bad, but we were just hot in our fall gear" (p. 23).

    "I watched her for a minute to see if she understood about gray areas. I'd just learned it myself and was trying it out" (p. 26).

    For more of my reviews, visit sjkessel.blogspot.com.

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