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The Age of the Unthinkable: Why the New World Disorder Constantly Surprises Us And What We Can Do About It

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 41 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted March 15, 2011

    Fascinating read. If you are not stimulated to think broader, then that would a loss.

    If you have ever wondered why political leaders seem to think one-dimensionally, it is because they do. This is an age of intense systems integration and high adaptability made more dangerous by the rapidity of change. Couple this with Cyber War and The Greatest Show on Earth and you have a trilogy for your summer reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2010

    The Age of the Unthinkable

    Great book! Ramo shows that wisdom goes beyond age. He challenges our thinking and suggests new ways to look at issues in our uncertain world.

    S.C.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2009

    Great Read!

    I think Ramo has done a great job conveying his thoughts. He has used theories and experiments of different era to explain his view points about the world. He certainly doesnt solve any problems like the Palestine-Israel or any others he has talked about in the book, but does show the path to solving the problems. I hope he continues to write these sorts of interesting books. Its no easy road to prosperity in this world and he has made that very obvious.

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  • Posted September 12, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    JC Ramo suggests we do some Unspeakably Good, Unthinkably Decent Things

    Let's look at some of the points made in this piece:
    .Don't fear chaos; work with it.
    .Promote peer relationships and tap the wisdom of crowds.
    .Don't beat your enemies; empathize with them and manipulate them.
    Instead of "co-opting" and "manipulating" the enemy, how can we embrace the enemies and opponents of change and finally, with empathy, turn their hearts? Yes, the tree organizer in Brazil (Chico Mendes) was killed for trying to fight with or disrupt or change the system. Didn't some people eventually respect Gandhi (MLK Jr, other innovators) to let him live in relative peace?

    What did Deming say? It's not the people. It's the system. The organization makes people make bad decisions (at some point there is eveil in the world, there are sociopaths who chagne the system and pervert good systems, but there are good people who are perverted by the system).


    Anselm Kiefer's lead books

    Deming fought perverted systems. He drove out fear, he drove our people who perverted a good system.

    Anselm Kiefer's Salute

    At some point the conformists no longer feel a threat from the rebel - if the rebel makes a space in the new world for the conformist. Let's show the conformist how to improve the world and protect in a new way, using many o ftheir old "sustaining" and "maintaining" skills. The rebel needs the conformist. How can we embraces Osama? Hard, perhaps unethical or morally reprehensible or impossible to do so. How can we embrace kids who idolize Obama? Easier.

    How do we embrace the bully? How do we turn the heart or give the bully something fulfilling to do that uses the bully's skills of domination driven by fear of change?
    Ramo isn't saying that we should be passive in the face of danger. He's saying:
    .Don't be mesmerized by the most obvious - or most recent - threats. Look at the periphery.
    .Be nimble, adaptable, resilient.
    .Learn to see the signs of change and embrace it.
    .Understand that small things can have big impacts.
    .Don't fear chaos; work with it.
    .Promote peer relationships and tap the wisdom of crowds.
    .Don't beat your enemies; empathize with them and manipulate them.
    .Be willing to give up grand strategies such as bringing democracy to the Middle East.



    In other words, follow the suggestions on this website:
    BuildingInternationalBridges.org

    Start at home with Dennis Littky's list in his book, The Big Picture. It's interesting to see the parallels. What would it be like to sit in a room with Dan Pink, Ramo, Friedman and Littky talking over wine and cheese?

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  • Posted September 5, 2009

    The Age of the Unthinkable

    Unbelievable!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 25, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A wake up to America from a leading geostratigist!

    The book gives a new understanding to expect the unexpected in things to come. A wake up to America! The author incorporates several examples that show the old physics, the old ways of doing things may not be valid much longer as we face unpredictabl problems. It emphasizes the importance of understanding we are very much a part of the world dynamic and can no longer consider ourselves exempt. Very interesting when one takes the time to digest it! I had to do just that because my degree is in a totally different field. He is knowledgable, forthcoming, and has frontline experience to share. A MUST IF YOU ARE SEEING THE CHANGES IN OUR WORLD AND SOCIETY COMING TOO FAST!! His chapters on Riding the Earthquake and the Revolution and You are something you will want to read so you can be better prepared to cope with things to come. I HIGHLY recommend this book if you are open to understanding there is a new world order and want to find out what you can o about it. In today's world education is our first armor.

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  • Posted July 25, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Consistent with traditional values

    I was completely absorbed by Mr. Roth's seculat insights that untimately arrived at a reaffirmation of traditional values. His "resilient living" is consistent with my own efforts to understand my faith. His language is completely secular & riviting, but if you substitute the word "miracle" for "unthinkable," you can also arrive at a deep appreciatin of the mystery of life itself, which each world religion describes differently.

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  • Posted June 29, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Interesting but nothing entirely new

    I enjoyed the book very much and it definitely got the gears going to think about what he wrote about. However, he spends the majority of the book saying he's going to offer a solution and winds up not really giving one.

    The gist of the book is that we now live in an age where trying to predict things is futile. In my opinion, it always has been throughout history, but now we in the US are learning this lesson. We assume that things go by a certain mathematical way of being that has been taught in political science class. Yet, life is increasingly unpredicatable. What Ramo argues is that we need to build up a better "immune system" to be prepared for anything, as opposed to trying to predict anything. He likens it to your body which does not try to predict what disease or cold it might get, but makes itself strong so that when it gets a cold it might be unpleasant but it can fight it. He says we need to do the same as a society. Have a strong infrastructure so if we get hit by a flu outbreak, a terrorist attack, etc. it will be unpleasant but we'll be strong enough as a society to withstand it.

    A good read to think and hear about examples of that. However, if you're looking for answers this is not the book for you. So as long as that's not your expectation, you can enjoy it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2009

    A good companion reader to Friedman's "The World is Flat"

    Interesting, thought-provoking, and a compelling read, I was much more impressed by the insight and perspective of this book than I had expected to be.

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    Posted November 30, 2010

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