Customer Reviews for

Alibi

Average Rating 3.5
( 15 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted May 14, 2010

    Who Cares!

    This about sums up my feelings about Alibi---who cares! The characters are cardboard and this reader felt no connection with any of it. If you want to read about Venice, just pick up any of Donna Leon's Brunetti series---at least there, you care about what happens to the people involved in the story.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 14, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    A MORALITY PLAY

    The Alibi, by Joseph Karon, is a morality play set in an historical mystery. The setting is Venice one year after World War II has ended. Like a Michael Dibdin mystery, Venice is corrupt, but with a working purpose. Tourists must be attracted back to a beautiful and safe city which is putting out the message they didn't really get involved in the war enough to worry about ex-nazis and fascists lurking around. Unfortunately, the main character, an ex-GI war criminal research analyst, doesn't get the message, and looks for collaborators around every corner. He settles on one who is engaged to his widowed mother, happily renting a very nice house in Venice, and the plot spins on from there. Murder is done, and Karon sets up the plot as a question of whether or not the killing is justifiable since it involves someone suspected of collaborating with the nazis. The reader is left juggling a combination of beautiful and historic Venice with the question of whether or not good people should be caught and punished for killng a suspected collaborator. Other innocents get caught up in the plot, some pay a terrible price while completely innocent, and everyone seems to know what is going on, but nobody wants to get at the truth. The tension is fierce. I could not put this book down and finished it about 3 o'clock in the morning. A great read to say the least, and Karon's best book by far.<BR/>A retired history teacher

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2007

    Just Get On With It, Mr. Kanon

    Kanon brings Venice to life. I could nearly smell the canals, and hear the water lapping against the sides of the buildings. He is sensitive to the little subtlties in the relationships between people, and his characters are well drawn. But it takes him forever to say what he has to say. At one point I checked the number of pages in the book, thinking that a sharper editor would have tightened it up to half its length. This book would make a good movie, cast with lots of beautiful people, one of those European spy things where the viewer isn't quite sure what is happening, but is happy going along for the ride. 'Gondola ride, in this case'. This is a book that promises much and leaves the reader disappointed by the end.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2012

    A murder mystery that you will know the murderer!

    The author describes vivid pictures of the setting - Venice after WW II. He proceeds to paint descriptions of characters through dialogue. The murder takes place. That's it. However there are still 200 pages left!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2005

    Not impressed

    After reading the Alibi, I was dissapointed with the overall structure of the story and subsequent developments. I felt many parts of the book that focused on the human aspect were predictable and not realistic. As for the setting of the book, I think Kanon did a good job of describing post war Venice and many of the attitudes and feelings that lay just under the surface. Overall I felt that this particular story did not complement the writer's obvious skill when comparing with past books such as the Prodigal Spy.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2005

    A SPLENDID VOICE PERFORMANCE

    Protagonist Adam Miller, a former U.S. investigator of war crimes, opens his story by saying 'After the war, my mother took a house in Venice.' That she did and, to a great degree, was able to carry on as if World War II had never interrupted her life. She resurrects her relationship with Dr. Maglione, and joins the whirl of wealthy expatriates who seem to believe it has always been carnival time in Venice. Miller comes to Venice to visit his mother, hoping to forget the atrocities that have become so familiar to him. For a while, it seems that Venice has remained untouched by war. It's as beautiful and mysterious as ever. He does suspect that Dr. Maglione is more attracted to his mother's checkbook than to her, but there is more to come. Often alone, Miller meets Claudia, a Jewish woman who has been deeply scarred by the war, not physically but psychologically. They fall in love. All is well until she meets the good doctor and accuses him of having collaborated with the Nazis. When a murder occurs Miller is forced to examine what he really believes is right and wrong, who is telling the truth and who is being deceptive. Venice is a particularly appealing backdrop for this part mystery, part love story, and all intriguing novel. Holter Graham provides a splendidly controlled, always articulate voice performance of this arresting portrait of postwar Venice. - Gail Cooke

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2005

    Disappointing

    This book is a weak follow-up to Kanon's 'The Good German.' Whereas the earlier book is filled with depth and narratives of significance, 'Alibi' is an overwrought pot-boiler with cliches instead of moral dilemnas and an unrealistic, far-fetched plot. Try again, Joe.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    terrific historical tale

    By 1946 still horrified by what he has seen, former U.S. Army war crimes investigator Adam Miller travels to Venice to see his widowed mother Grace. To his surprise the city is like a beautiful oasis in war ravaged Europe unscathed by the horrors that Adam has seen especially in Germany. --- Adam meets Italian Jew Claudia Grassini at a party. They fall in love and begin an affair. However, Claudia spent time in the Fossoli concentration camp, leaving her feeling guilty that she lived while so many others died. While Adam courts Claudia, Grace is seeing a pre war lover aristocratic Dr. Gianni Mangion. Adam does not trust Gianni sensing something sinister perhaps involving the Fascist years. He begins investigating his mother¿s lover and soon murders occur ultimately leading to the good soldier Adam choosing between justice and the law with either selection further devastating his already weakened inner soul. --- ALIBI is a terrific historical tale that uses war crimes, a murder mystery, and a romance to tell the tale of Post WWII Venice. The story line is fast-paced and action packed never slowing down for a moment. However what makes this thriller so chilling and thrilling is the deep cast. Adam, Grace, Claudia, and Gianni, supported by the grand city and residents trying to heal, are fully developed characters that bring home the era. The audience receives a fantastic novel that showcases Joseph Kanon¿s skills.--- Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1