Customer Reviews for

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

24 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

Well Done

I've never read the book before last week and must say that disney must have had something against Lewis Carroll because they butchered this amazing book by making that cartoon. This book has an amazing amount of detail that will keep you imagining about each chapter fo...
I've never read the book before last week and must say that disney must have had something against Lewis Carroll because they butchered this amazing book by making that cartoon. This book has an amazing amount of detail that will keep you imagining about each chapter for hours. I would recommend this book to anyone with an open mind and a wild imagination. Instant Classic on my shelf

posted by Bran on April 2, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

10 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

A New Appreciation

I decided to read this book after seeing the Tim Burton movie. It had been years since I had seen the Disney cartoon Alice and Wonderland and I remember seeing a Disney version of Alice Through the Looking Glass. In order to remind myself of what I hd seen I decided to ...
I decided to read this book after seeing the Tim Burton movie. It had been years since I had seen the Disney cartoon Alice and Wonderland and I remember seeing a Disney version of Alice Through the Looking Glass. In order to remind myself of what I hd seen I decided to read the book and get the original story since I never read it before. I was not overly impressed by the story but enthralled with the imagination and creativity of the world that Alice "falls" into. However I now have more respect for the classic and I definitely think it is something everyone should have in their library as a reminder of what real creativity and imagination was like without being gruesome and gory.

posted by 3432638 on April 25, 2010

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  • Posted February 28, 2011

    Highly recommended to all who injoy a good read

    while sometimes confuseing and hard to understand, this two novels in one holds Lewis Carrolls greatest legacy. the story of a mature young girl going through bizzare and wierd adventures, that at times makes one think about common truths of the world and opens up new ways to understand things. much of these things are epertly explained in the introduction by Tan Lin. excellent illustrations and a story that even the young can enjoy and the old appreciate.

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  • Posted January 23, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    The Wonderful Gift

    When I first read Alice's Adventures in Wonderland I instantly fell in love with the book. This edition of this infamous story is a great one. It includes bio on the author as well as a time-line. The book include footnotes on things that might not be clear. Every illustration is well printed on every page. However, the only flaw with the book is the cover quality. The cover of the book becomes damaged at the ends of it and begins to peel. This can be an issue for most readers, but in the end the book is a great edition too anyone's library.

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  • Posted January 19, 2011

    Very interesting!!

    This book has so many unanswered questions that it seems as if in reality, it's ok for questions to be unanswered and in some cases rediculious. It brings to mind many things and may even bring back a child that is hidden deep inside of you no matter what your age. I highly recommend.

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  • Posted January 6, 2011

    :):):):):):)

    Fantastic book! Alice has a extrordinary imagination, and wonderful 'friends'. The story is written with much detail,and is one of my favorites.

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  • Posted July 17, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A Classic

    This book is always worth reading. It's a classic story that I don't feel will ever get old. This book is the epitome of escapism as young Alice journeys through Wonderland meeting impossible characters. The beginning of this book has a good note on the meaning behind Alice's tales.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2010

    Suprising to read the source.

    I grew up knowing of Alice in Wonderland but was supprised when I actuley read the book. Most of my ideas of the tale have been from movies and tv shows. To actuly read how the Mad Hatter was organaly writen and to be able the seperate the Queen of Hearts from the Red Queen was very enlightining.

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  • Posted April 8, 2010

    A must have

    As a child, I never was that into Alice in Wonderland; the 1950's Disney movie freaked me out. However, when the Alice bug caught recently I decided to read the source material. Not only was the story an easy and engaging read, this version of the book made the experience more enjoyable. With its small dimensions, this copy is an easy carry on to read on the go: trains, buses, waiting rooms, etc. Having both Alice's adventures in wonderland combined with Through the Looking Glass was extremely helpful as at any point you could flip back to the first when some parallels were encountered. The illustrations are also artfully placed as to not distract from the reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2010

    Classic

    A classic story. The Introduction was a little lengthy and wordy for me, but the story is still as wonderful as it was when I was a kid!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2010

    Goody.

    I really enjoyed this book, although the writing was a bit old but that's okay. (considering this book was written in 1850 something) Anyway, i recommend this book to anyone who is looking for an escape into wonderland. :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2009

    Interesting and funny book

    Enjoyed by 12 yo boy. Kids at school had been talking about it & son thought he would like to read it himself. He really enjoyed it & it kept his attention. He said he wanted to see what was going to happen next. He recommended that everyone have a copy of their own.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2006

    Alice: ignorant or wise

    Alice⿿s Adventures in Wonderland is an examination of the similarities between ignorance and wisdom. Lewis Carroll uses aspects of satire and irony to show how an education is only worthwhile when employed in a suitable environment. In Alice⿿s new environment (Wonderland) everything she has learned in day school proves to be worthless. This fact manifests itself within two aspects of the story: 1) she cannot remember things she once knew (⿿⿠I⿿m afraid I am, Sir,⿠said Alice. ⿿I ca⿿n⿿t remember things as I used⿦⿠⿿ (42)) and 2) the things she can remember don⿿t affect the unreasonable world she becomes a part of. The latter is the more important of the two because it gives the author the ability to pit reason against lunacy which is exemplified in the dialogues between Alice and the Queen of Hearts, Alice and the Caterpillar, and especially Alice and the Cheshire Cat. Alice finds statements she understands to be reasonable (usually in the form of a question) to be communicated as strange or unacceptable. On page 56 Alice says, ⿿Would you tell me, please, which way ought I to go from here?⿠and is answered by the Cat, ⿿That depends a good deal on where you want to go.⿠The conversation goes on to show that nothing Alice can say will elicit an acceptable response from the Cat. This sort of situation becomes the basis for all satirical and ironic elements of the story. Perfectly straight forward questions are responded to as if they are nonsensical and the only people able to get anywhere are those who most embody this lunacy. Carroll is saying that a genius can be lost when traveling through a land of fools. This lesson can be an important one for readers of any age: Children can learn that anyone can need a helping hand while adults will understand that it is not wrong to ask for such support. Carroll uses simplicity and childhood to examine issues that can become quite adult in nature. This characteristic can mislead readers into thinking Alice⿿s Adventures in Wonderland is a children⿿s book. Upon finishing it, though, they will realize that Carroll⿿s whole premise is that adults may still have a lot to learn from children.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2006

    Literary Review

    Lewis Carroll takes his characters in Alice¿s Adventures in Wonderland to the extreme and beyond. There is much symbolism in his characters as well. Alice seems to be quite the dreamer trapped in a society eaten body. Carroll shows us there is still a little girl inside all of us women even-though we have to act somewhat ¿proper¿ to fit into society. The mad hatter and queen of hearts are also extreme symbols of society, being that they jump to conclusion and don¿t take time to really think anything over. The white rabbit also shares this quality with them. Lewis Carroll also shows that there is some hope left however, in his caterpillar character. There is also a unique style of writing that Carroll chose. It¿s extreme also, taking every scene into a whole different world. It seems as though there are many stories here that are put together into one tale, and ties it all together with the help of one little girl with one big imagination.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2006

    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (Barnes & Noble Cla

    I read a very interesting book for these past few weeks. It was a book called written by Lewis Carroll. Lewis Carroll based some of the characters in this story from real live events from his on. The book is called, ¿Alice¿s Adventures in Wonderland.¿ This book is about a little seven year old girl that dozes off into a new world in her imagination. This incident happens because she gets bored that her sisters are reading books with no pictures in them. Alice faces numerous wacky and silly characters throughout her adventure in Wonderland. First, she is encountered by a rabbit that dresses up and has the ability to talk like a human. She follows the rabbit into a hole and before she knows it, she¿s in a different reality. Next, she encounters a little door and has no idea how to get through. On the table to her side there¿s a key and a couple of snacks. On one of the snacks is labeled, ¿Eat me!¿ Alice eats numerous snacks throughout her adventure and these snacks enable her to get really big or really small. She goes through the door and encounters other creatures. While trying to follow the rabbit she follows him to his house. There the rabbit accidentally calls her Mary Ann assuming that she¿s his maid. He tells her to fetch for his gloves in the house. Alice listens and as soon as she enters the house becomes enormous and becomes stuck. The rabbit calls many people to help Alice get out of his house but there¿s no success. Finally, the rabbit gives up and leaves to meet the queen while Alice is stuck there. Alice gets out finally, and encounters a caterpillar next. The caterpillar asks all sorts of question while puffing his hookah. One question was what Alice¿s name is. Alice replies and then leaves next encountering the Cheshire-Cat. The Cheshire-Cat becomes somewhat of her friend but is a very mysterious character throughout the book. After meeting the cat, Alice meets up the Mad Hatter and March Hare. These two characters are always drinking tea are assumed to be mad by everyone. These two people have no manners while getting to know Alice. After all these meeting with everyone Alice finally meets the Queen of Hearts and the King of Hearts. The Queen of Hearts is the boss out of the two. The Queen of Hearts is in charge of everything and challenges Alice to a match of croquet. After Alice loses the match of croquet, the Queen of Hearts puts Alice on trial. She does this because Alice sorts of offends her. Alice becomes really big inside the courtroom and the King of Hearts says that she has to go become she¿s not following rule 42. Rule 42 states that anyone over a mile high must leave the courtroom. Alice angrily replies that he made the rule up and says she isn¿t afraid of anything. The Queen of Hearts tells all her soldiers in an act of revenge to get her. While Alice sees this all of a sudden is woken up by her sister. Alice looks around and tells her sister of the story. I think this book is really interesting because I understand the book much more than before. I was first introduced to this book when I was a little kid and had no idea what the book was mentioning. This is a really awesome book to read on your spare time. I recommend this book for many others that are interested in reading a book with mystery and comedy. Alice¿s Adventures in Wonderland is a great book!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2006

    A Craving for Youth

    As I began to read the introduction to Alice¿s Adventures in Wonderland written by Lewis Carroll, I was surprisingly intrigued and inspired. Although some may perceive an introduction to be lengthy and pointless, I took the time to contradict this statement. The introduction made me read the story in a whole other point of view. It made me think more in depth as to why each character acts in their distinct way or says certain abnormal statements. It also makes you ponder about the theme of children growing up to fast and adults needing to connect with their imagination more. In this story, the main character Alice is a seven year old little girl who finds herself bored with her older sister¿s books. In her state of boredom, she drifts off into sleep and ends up chasing after a particular white rabbit she notices with a watch. She ends up falling down his rabbit hole straight into a land of peculiar talking creatures in a bizarre environment. Soon after she enters this fantasy land, she finds herself to tall to continue pursuing the white rabble. Her only choice is to drink a bottle labeled ¿Drink Me¿. She suddenly shrank to the exact size to be able to enter the door that the rabbit had entered. Only trouble is that now she has forgotten the key on the table that is too tall to reach now. Just as she began to cry in anguish, she eats a piece of cake labeled ¿Eat Me¿ and she abruptly grows to nine feet tall. Alice, now feeling alone and not herself, turns to a mouse she sees for questions. The mouse ends up not being of help because Alice persists of talking about her cat Dinah. Alice eventually comes across the white rabbit once more but he mistakenly thinks of her as his maid Mary Ann. He tells her to get his gloves and fan from his house but she innocently drank from another bottle and grew to overtake the small house. Alice runs away not knowing how to return to her normal size until she comes across a mushroom with Caterpillar on top. He tells her that one side of the mushroom will shrink her and the other will make her taller. After returning to her normal state she encounters the Cheshire-Cat who is mysterious yet has decent information that is somewhat confusing but better than nothing. . Using his knowledge, she decides to trek forward towards The Hare and The Hatter. They are unnoticeably rude in the way they talk while they have tea with Alice. Soon after that Alice finally meets The King and The Queen. The Queen challenges her to play a game of crochet, which she loses. By accidentally offending The Queen, Alice is put on trial to ultimately be executed. While on trial, Alice begins to grow tall again. This infuriates The Queen and goes against Rule 42 which states that anybody over a mile high must be removed from the courtroom. The Queen demands her to be beheaded but Alice is no longer afraid of a pack of cards. Just as all of the cards swarm her she wakes up by the riverside with her sister where she first drifted off. She begins to tell her sister of her adventures while going to tea. This story has a wonderful play with words that challenge your mind and twist your imagination. As a reader, it also makes you wonder about the evolution of growing up. There is this delightful comedic tone to the story that is sometimes confusing but overall allows your mind to reach imagination extremes. I would recommend this book to anybody. I would say that one should have a fresh, lively attitude while reading it. I just love how this story takes you beyond a fantasy land and into a place that is appealing and attractive. It is as if you are there in Wonderland, making your own decisions as to drink the bottle or eat the piece of cake. It can surely turn any dull thoughts into bright and creative adventures.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2006

    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (Barnes & Noble Cla

    an outstanding book!! should be read by everyone it's good. isn't that hard to read. Also Alice is an extraordinary character and faces many dangers throughout her adventure in wonderland. READ IT!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2006

    My adventure through Alices Adventures in Wonderland

    Alice in Wonderland is a book that fits its title to a tee. The book revolves completely around a young girl who enters wonderland a place that is confusing, random and very odd. The book though random is not that hard to follow. In all honesty it¿s the type of book where you can pick a random chapter of the book and follow it amazingly well. Lewis Carroll writes his book in a clever way. It¿s as though he puts his words and writing down as they appear in his head. They get smaller when Alice smaller and larger as Alice grows. The book has a beginning middle and an end yet each part is defiantly separate and definitely has different meanings, yet somehow Carroll links each of them. Alice in Wonderland is definitely a book that I would recommend it¿s the type of book that you can sit down and read in one sitting, but you don¿t have to. It¿s a book that¿s easy to read and easy to follow, it doesn¿t take a lot of in depth thought. It does jump around a lot and is very sporadic yet not in a way that you can¿t follow. So if your looking for a book that you can just sit down, relax, and read an interesting book, I¿d recommend Alice in wonderland.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2006

    great book!

    After falling asleep while sitting with her sister on a bank, Alice begins her adventure by following a talking white rabbit down his rabbit hole. The fall was the first unusual event that happened directly to Alice. She passed shelves of jam and other nonsense on her way down. Her fist obstacle was trying to get through a very small door to get into a beautiful garden. However, but taking in different substances in the room such as potions in little bottles, she grows to different sizes, all leaving her more problems of getting through the door. After she runs into many different creatures, including a story telling mouse, a hookah smoking caterpillar, a rude duchess, a disappearing Cheshire cat, a mad hatter, and a tea drinking hare, her journey takes her through Wonderland and back to that door again, only this time, she is the right size. Upon entering the garden, she saw how cruel the Queen of Wonderland is. Almost every other phrase she said was ¿off with their head!¿ Alice plays a long and confusing game of croquet with her and the other creatures of her kingdom. Eventually all of the creatures of Wonderland gather at a trial in which the Knave of Hearts is being accused of stealing the queens tarts. After disrupting the whole courtroom, Alice wakes up from her dream the book comes to a close. I really enjoyed this book because so many unexpected things happen. Everything was very creative and out of the ordinary. The book really kept my attention with all of the interesting creatures and the different situations she was put in. However, I got annoyed every once in a while with how much Alice seemed to think she knew, even though she admitted quite a few times that she did not remember much of stuff from reality, so obviously she was not as smart as she thought she was anymore. If you are a reader with a wild imagination and appreciation for creativity, then this book is for you. I would recommend it to anyone who is entertained by the strange and amused by twisted characters. This book is a great read if you have a crazy way of thinking. Basically, as long as you like to use your imagination and experience the unthinkable, Alice¿s Adventures in Wonderland would be a great book to read.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2004

    Trudging Through Genius

    I'll be honest and say that I was a bit wary of reading Lewis Carroll's 'Alice in Wonderland.' As I flipped through the first few pages and stopped at the illustrations, images of the horrid-yet-lucid Disney version spun through my head like a horrific tornado. Still, however, I chose to plunge into the ominous depths of this tale...and disappointed I was not. Lewis Carroll, the pseudonym of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, painted a powerful and dreamlike sequence of events that forever changed the way I looked at life, as well as giving us a very good read. As most know, the story begins with Alice following the White Rabbit into his rabbit-hole and ends with a trial. What amazed me about the path of the plot is how Charles managed to change each scene with good flow. If you read this, you'll find yourself in a Croquet game one chapter, and on a Beach with the Mock Turtle in the next, and the sudden changes do not stop there! It is also great how Charles manages to make Alice grow with the reader. Alice begins in Wonderland just as the reader does: lost, dazed, and slightly curious as to why things are so wierd. As she progresses through the story, with us by her side, we see and feel a transformation in both ourselves and Alice. By the end of the Story we can fully understand and appreciate the word games that each character uses, we are able to return to the beginning and pick up on those lost quirks, such as the 'dry' tale that is supposed to 'dry' everyone off. Based off of these things you could easily give Alice a five star rating alone, however, there is one problem. In the beginning, it seems to me that Charles used too many of his word games. I often found myself rereading passages and still ending with a confused expression on my face. Of course, as I said before, once you reach the end you can reread it and fully appreciate Charles' genius, but it is totally lost on the sunshine reader that picks up books once. Therefore, I award Alice a four out of five stars, and stand by this readily.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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