BN.com Gift Guide
Customer Reviews for

All Clear

Average Rating 4
( 79 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(38)

4 Star

(19)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(9)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

The sequel to Blackout is a fantastic time travel thriller

The twenty-first century historians (Polly Churchill, Merope Ward, and Michael Ward) remain stuck in England during the Nazi Blitz of the country. After being separated for a time (see Blackout), they reunite in London. However, their effort to find a way to tell thei...
The twenty-first century historians (Polly Churchill, Merope Ward, and Michael Ward) remain stuck in England during the Nazi Blitz of the country. After being separated for a time (see Blackout), they reunite in London. However, their effort to find a way to tell their future associates at Oxford in 2060 about their predicament remains impossible.

They also know time is running out before Polly's presence causes a time paradox having been to this era once before. Their fears over the Polly quandary also have them afraid they may have already changed 1940, which will have ripple effects into their time and beyond.

The sequel to Blackout is a fantastic time travel thriller as the trio struggles with the notions that ironically time is running out on them and they may have caused a change in the future. The story line is fast-paced, but the previous tale must be read first to grasp the nuances of All Clear. Fans will relish this strong tale as the trapped threesome in 1940 is unaware that their colleagues back in 2060 are working a time correction to insure All Quiet on the Western Front.

Harriet Klausner

posted by harstan on October 2, 2010

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

"What if...?"

What if this book had an editor who knew how to wield a red pencil? What if someone had actually bothered to check how many times the phrase "what if" began a sentence in this book? What if the plot wasn't sidetracked by ENDLESS worrying about "what ifs" by its princi...
What if this book had an editor who knew how to wield a red pencil? What if someone had actually bothered to check how many times the phrase "what if" began a sentence in this book? What if the plot wasn't sidetracked by ENDLESS worrying about "what ifs" by its principal characters? What if the story focused on what the characters actually did, rather than their incessant "what if" questioning? What if the author spent more time on the interesting details of life under the Blitz, or better fleshed out what was happening back in the future?

Then, the book may have been worth reading...

posted by MrBlueEsq on November 2, 2010

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 81 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 5
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2010

    "What if...?"

    What if this book had an editor who knew how to wield a red pencil? What if someone had actually bothered to check how many times the phrase "what if" began a sentence in this book? What if the plot wasn't sidetracked by ENDLESS worrying about "what ifs" by its principal characters? What if the story focused on what the characters actually did, rather than their incessant "what if" questioning? What if the author spent more time on the interesting details of life under the Blitz, or better fleshed out what was happening back in the future?

    Then, the book may have been worth reading...

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2011

    Phew...

    This book stinks.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 2, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    The sequel to Blackout is a fantastic time travel thriller

    The twenty-first century historians (Polly Churchill, Merope Ward, and Michael Ward) remain stuck in England during the Nazi Blitz of the country. After being separated for a time (see Blackout), they reunite in London. However, their effort to find a way to tell their future associates at Oxford in 2060 about their predicament remains impossible.

    They also know time is running out before Polly's presence causes a time paradox having been to this era once before. Their fears over the Polly quandary also have them afraid they may have already changed 1940, which will have ripple effects into their time and beyond.

    The sequel to Blackout is a fantastic time travel thriller as the trio struggles with the notions that ironically time is running out on them and they may have caused a change in the future. The story line is fast-paced, but the previous tale must be read first to grasp the nuances of All Clear. Fans will relish this strong tale as the trapped threesome in 1940 is unaware that their colleagues back in 2060 are working a time correction to insure All Quiet on the Western Front.

    Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 24, 2014

    Review is for both Blackout and All Clear. Complaints first: 1.

    Review is for both Blackout and All Clear. Complaints first:
    1. More historical fiction than science fiction: There is an underlying time travel/science fiction element to the books, but 95% of the content is about living in England during the years before and during WWII - Dunkirk, the Battle of Britain, the Blitz, and the V-1 and V-2 rocket attacks.
    2. Total content of the two books is 25-50% too long - for example, when a character is faced with a dilemma, the reader doesn't need to hear them think through every ramification of every option they have, every time; as another example, when our heroes are escaping from a 7-story building, it isn't necessary for the author to take us through every floor, with the thoughts and concerns of each character on each floor.
    Overall, however, the books are highly readable, and since many chapters end in cliffhanger fashion, the story does keep one's interest. Characters are likeable and believable. And as historical fiction goes, the information is fascinating - I'm a big fan of history, and these books gave me a comprehensive appreciation of the dangers and sacrifices of the people of Britain during WWII, which lasted much longer for them than it did for American and Americans.
    The time travel element is also flawlessly executed, though you should keep the first novel handy as you read the second, to go back and reference chapters that, at the time you first read them, don't seem to fit the story. It's not linear, and keeping notes as to who is who, and when, will serve you well.
    So if you dont' mind the occasional thought of "C'mon, get on with it", these can be very enjoyable books.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 15, 2013

    "All Clear" is the second half of the novel begun in t

    "All Clear" is the second half of the novel begun in the volume "Blackout." The first volume marshalls the characters, sets up their situations, and frames the terms of the mystery. The present volume is where the action takes place. The two volumes together constitute a stunning novel that explores the British home front during World War II and Ms. Willis' favorite locale, London during the Blitz. Readers should be warned that neither volume is complete without the other; the first volume ends just as the setup is complete and the action is about to begin, and the second volume will make no sense to a reader who has not read the first volume. Any reader who has not read "Blackout" shortly before plunging into "All Clear" might well find it helpful to reread volume one before starting volume two.

    Using her time-traveling historians as viewpoint characters, Ms. Willis explores a number of issues, in particular the distinction between what we can know of an historical event and what the experience was like for those who lived it. The overarching theme of the novel is heroism. One of the historians is present to study heroism explicitly in three specific instances during the War. He gets caught up in the rescue of the troops at Dunkirk, is wounded, and his world unravels from there. He gets a close-up view of heroism, trying to understand it in others and also finding it within himself. We also see the heroism of Londoners on the home front, a heroism called up by different circumstances yet no less real than the heroism of the battlefield. The Blitz must have been a horrific experience to those who lived during it; Ms. Willis does a superb job of evoking that period of the War, neither sensationalizing nor trivializing it.

    Another theme, which is present, more or less overtly, in all the time-travel novels and stories, is what I call the "rules of engagement." Each historian is forced to confront his or her position as an observer and must work out how to relate to the "contemps" he or she encounters. Here, the dilemma is acute: how do you relate yourself rightly to people who are caught in a terrible situation, when you are an observer with plans to depart? Can you make friends, must you remain aloof--and in the situation of this novel, how can you watch people suffering on such a scale without getting involved?

    As is usual in Ms. Willis' time-travel novels, the characters must confront unexpected behavior on the part of the space-time continuum, and as usual, the resolution is quite unexpected yet tells us something about the nature of the universe and the moral values that undergird community life. As usual, the continuum is a sort of "silent character" that moves in mysterious ways to achieve unclear ends, ends which the historians must figure out--in this novel because the answer literally means the difference between life and death for them and for the contemps for whom they have begun to care. Ms. Willis' love of screwball comedy is equally apparent in "Blackout/All Clear" as it is in "To Say Nothing of the Dog" but is transformed here into what might be more appropriately called screwball drama.

    The resolution to the characters' difficulties is, as is typical of Ms. Willis' novels, both unexpected and highly satisfying. I highly recommend this novel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2013

    Excellent

    It is rare that I want to reread a book as soon as I finished reading the first time.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2012

    Recommended with reservations

    I had a lot of questions about the premise, the sense of urgency and rush that the post grads and students exhibited in trying to get to the past to observe and study, and the lack of concern about what time travel might do. After that I enjoyed the historical narrative and remained interested in what happened to the characters for the entire rather long novel (the combination of Blackout and All Clear)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2012

    ?

    Yes. Deathwisper will. Shes the inly one i no of who will die when me and my sisters fight.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2012

    Boremeer here

    I cannot post at the next result plz come here. I hope someone reads this. Oh g i wish my nok would leave me b. :-(

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 6, 2012

    Outstanding

    This 641-page conclusion to the first book of this two-book series ("Blackout") is probably the best Science Fiction/Fantasy book I have ever read. The detail is extremely realistic, and I have no reason to doubt that it is historically accurate. The conclusion of the story lines is emotional and surprising. I was unable to put the book down during the last 200 pages or so. Willis is certainly the best at her craft in the modern era. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and I would recommend to anybody.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 28, 2011

    highly recommended

    This is a great book. This book is for anyone who has just returned from vacation to Europe or the UK. In it, you will find many of the same tube station stops. You will find yourself wanting to carry on with any of the characters who are on journey through many of the tourist attractions like trafalagar square or Saint Paul's gardens. It is a one of a kind time travellers book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 15, 2011

    A Real Page-Turner!

    When I finished Blackout I had to get this one to find out what happened! Connie Willis always makes me care for her characters and that was true here as well. Alf and Binnie were my favorites!) I also enjoy how she puts light and funny scenes in just when they're needed to ease the tension. I'll definitely reread these books (after I reread the other books in this universe).

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 4, 2011

    The 2nd of Willis' new Oxford Time Travel story

    All Clear is the second (of two) volumes of Connie Willis' Blackout/All Clear "novel". Do not read this book until you have first read Blackout. These two volumes are not independent stories. All Clear picks up right where Blackout left off, and there's truly no help for you if you start with All Clear. Willis herself has said that these two volumes should be treated at one novel, and you do yourself a great disservice if you don't treat them that way yourself.

    I really like Willis' time travel stories, her "Doomsday Book" being one of my all-time favorites. Blackout/All Clear is set primarily during the London Blitz of World War II (with some diversions to other WWII locales and times). The storyline essentially is that of historians sent back in time to study elements of the war, and who wind up trapped in their past and spend the bulk of the books trying to get back to their base in 2060 Oxford.

    The storyline here has a tendency to get frustrating, since the characters have a very difficult time accomplishing the things they're trying to do. The ultimate resolution of the plot has more to do with what is done accidentally, rather than deliberately, and that tends to weaken the characters. It also means a close reading is helpful, and I'm sure a re-read (should I ever empty my to-be-read pile) will yield a significant amount of relevant detail I missed the first time around.

    Nevertheless, the ending is strong and well done --- once the "frustrating" bits are over, and the characters start to get a glimpse of what's really going on, it became really hard to put the book down.

    The world Willis paints of 1940s England is fantastic, and might really be the true star of the show. I don't really know if any of it is accurate, but I really got the feeling that she'd done an amazing amount of research and loved making sure the details were right.

    This pair of books was well worth reading, even with the frustrations there. 4.5 out of 5 stars.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 24, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Award-winning

    Fans of any genre of fiction will love this sequel to "Blackout."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 18, 2011

    Simply amazing...

    'Blackout' and 'All Clear' are both well written and deeply moving... as with 'The Doomsday Book', Connie Willis brings such life and emotion to both her characters and their world... as you read you can't help but become invested in them, to care for them and their struggles... a truly gifted writer.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 10, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Highly Recommended

    This follow up book to Blackout continued to have me enthralled throughout. I could barely put this book down, and when I had finished reading it, I wanted more. That is a lot to say for a sequel with over 600 pages, (the first book had nearly 600 pages). The plot is a little complicated due to the time travel aspect, but that is what kept me entertained. I fell in love with the characters, and I felt like I knew them. I could imagine every scene. The author did a great job at making me feel like I was there in London during World War II, hearing the air raid sirens, running to the underground shelters, mending stockings because they were so hard to come by...an amazing book by an amazing author. I can't wait to read another book by Connie Willis. If they are all as good as this book (and the first book), I will devour them all.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 1, 2010

    Loved the story but...

    I was warned not to read "Blackout" until "All Clear" had come out, so I read them over the weekend together. I love the story line, but the ending is confusing. She gets you so wrapped up in these peoples lives (see other reviews) and then doesn't really tell you what happened. That was the biggest disappointment. Then, since the other reader had read a copy out of the library, I was going to "lend" my e-book version so she could re-read and see if she could explain the ending to me better (who the heck is Colin really?) and I could not lend it. If I'd bought it in paper it would be in the mail already. I'm disappointed in the publisher being so rude about that.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 81 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 5