Customer Reviews for

All Over but the Shoutin'

Average Rating 4
( 80 )
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(43)

4 Star

(19)

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(10)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(4)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

One of my all-time favorites!

My Dad gave me this book years ago for Christmas when it first came out, saying "I'd never heard of it, but it seemed like it might be a good read." I was working in Bolivia at the time as a Peace Corps volunteer, and was thrilled to have some new reading material.

...
My Dad gave me this book years ago for Christmas when it first came out, saying "I'd never heard of it, but it seemed like it might be a good read." I was working in Bolivia at the time as a Peace Corps volunteer, and was thrilled to have some new reading material.

I was blown away by the writing. The only way I can describe it is by saying that this book is like gourmet food. The way Rick Bragg puts things into words is so fresh and unique, and he described a world I didn't know but instantly felt a part of.

For me, this is one of those books I always return to and enjoy more and more. I'm purposely not sharing what happens in it, because it is such a treat to have the whole thing fresh and unexpected, and I don't want to mar the experience for any new readers. Plus any description I give would come across as deplorably flat. Like trying to describe the beauty of spring to someone who has only experienced winter - there are no proper words to describe the sensory lushness.

I lent this to a fellow volunteer/writer friend - who ultimately went on to become an established well-known newspaper reporter -- and he was equally smitten. "I just can't believe how good this guy is!" he shared. "Man, that's good writing." He went on to lend my book to another friend, who lent it to another. After a while, everyone lost track of where my copy was, it had been lent to so many. So I bought the first of many replacement copies. If you lend it out (which you will) don't expect to get it back.

Equally good is the prequel, Ava's Man.

My reporter friend was lucky enough to meet Rick Bragg once, and I hope to do the same some fine day, just to express to him how much I enjoy his work. (Again, the food metaphor -- if a meal is outstanding, I always seek the cook out.)

Get this! I'm a little jealous of you, reader. You get to read this for the first time. Enjoy every second and linger in the words ...

~Katrina

posted by Katrina_Shalom_Seach on May 18, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

I don't like it

Okay maybe its because Im being forced to read this book, but I cant get past the second chapter. It doesnt entice me at all!!!!!

posted by Anonymous on August 11, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2008

    a wonderful read

    I would recommend this book to anyone. I chose this book because some of the thing reminded me of stories my grandmother used to tell me when I was a little girl. And because I enjoy a good memior. This is a very interesting story of how a boy came from the poor skirts of town and was determind to make it and to stay out. Some one that had felt his whole life that he wasn't good enough for society. He not only proved himself wrong he proved everyone else wrong also. He will make it no matter what he ha to do. He will be somebody- he is somebody.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2005

    Nathan Loveday, student at PSTCC

    This is a great story from a great author. He took us to his home town and told us of his trials and tribulations and life as a young man and up until the time he wrote this book. He grew up in a poor family with and alcoholic father who was never around and bragg's mother would have to raise bragg and his brother's by herself. They had a rough life but they perservered through hard times and everything turned out pretty good. Bragg went on to become a writer for several newspapers and also an author as well. His brother's turned out decent except for his youngest brother Mark who turned out just like his dad. Sam got a good job and got married and took care of his family.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 5, 2014

    Heartfelt family portrait

    Wonderful book, kept me and my fellow book club readers totally engaged. Rick Bragg writes in a conversational tone that is true to the various dialects of the real characters without caricaturing them. His story is sometimes funny, sometimes harrowing, always honest.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2013

    Pitamom4@aol.com

    Not my usual read, but did enjoy.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2012

    Love love love!!!!

    What makes this book great is Bragg's ability to make you feel his feelings, be there with him, see what he saw. This piece really moved me. I left the book sad about his opinions on God but understand where he is coming from. Great informaive read. Best memoir yet.

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  • Posted June 21, 2012

    A newsman's life

    I rarely do biographies, so this was not something I would normally read, or even know about, except for a book club meeting. It's about a man who was born "poor white trash", to a loving, but whipped Mom and an alcoholic Dad fighting Korean War demons. It's about his life growing up and into a Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper man. It talks about some of his stories, most of which are on, what he called "the dark side". It has it's laugh-out-loud parts, and the cry-out-loud parts, and the descriptions of Haiti are unbelievable. I think I recommend this, but it's not for everyone, especially those who are sensitive.

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  • Posted June 29, 2009

    An inspiring, informative and engaging story of a place few know.

    Rick Bragg is a very good story teller whose personal experience of climbing out of the deepest part of the most rural part Alabama is captivating. His mother is one of those people that you will not forget.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2005

    Uplifting

    Bragg describes his childhood in detail, from not having a father to a mother who sacrificed everything just so her children wouldn't go completely without. In his book a valuable lesson is learned, the lesson that it teaches is that no matter where and what you come from you can become anything you want to be. Look at Bragg a Pulitzer Prize winner and Times writer. This book was great.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2005

    very encouaging story

    I enjoyed Bragg's 'All Over but the Shoutin' because it shows how he overcame the tough parts of life that we all face in some way or another. It also shows what true love really is between a mother and her children. I would definately recomend reading this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2005

    Southern Confessions

    This book illustrates poverty in the south at its worst. From growing up with nothing and eventually becoming something, this novel demonstrates the choices we undergo through life. Great novel for southern understanding.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2005

    Good Southern Living

    This is a moving recolection of life in Northeast Alabama. Rick Bragg seemingly destined for the fields or jail and instead came a pulitzer prize winning reporter for the New York Times. A story of Braggs father a drunk with a murderous temper and a habit of running out on his family. On the other hand Braggs mother a wonderful woman with drive and love for her children. She went 18 years without a new dress so that her sons could have school clothes and other things. Rick Bragg brings home the love and suffering that lie at the heart of every family.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2004

    great read

    All Over but the Shoutin¿ is a memoir written by Rick Bragg. He wrote it in honor of his mother who had a great presence in his life. The book starts early in his life, when he was still just a toe-headed little boy. He grew up in poverty with his mom and two other bothers in a box house just barely big enough to live decently in. He didn¿t remember much of his father except for how every now and then he¿d get drunk and beat his mother. Rick had a blessed life in a sense. He survived a car crash that should have killed him, he came close to death in riots, became a famous journalist for the New York Times and he even won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing. I¿ll admit, I first choose this book by its cover. The pictures on the front for some reason told me it was going to be a good book. Little did I know the author had won the Pulitzer Prize and was a writer for the New York Times. I thought the book was great. The author did a good job of honoring his mother for all that she had helped him achieved, even if it was in small ways. I also liked the fact that the author had a lot of respect for the way he grew up. He didn¿t think his childhood was horrible because he grew up poor. There was nothing I really didn¿t like about the book. I think Rick has had quite an extraordinary life, better then most people. The book was good and I would recommend it if you want a great read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2002

    All Over but the Shoutin but trying to move on

    Rick Bragg wrote a very personal story of his life. It is a memoir of his life growing up dirt poor. He wrote the story in memory of his mother whom he loved very much. Rick Bragg felt so sorry that she had such a bad life being married to his father and then having to raise her children alone. Rick Bragg's story allows him to reconcile himself with the hurt and desertion that his father inflicted on him, his mother, and his brothers. I believe this was therapy for him emotionally to write about his personal life. It allowed him to forgive his father and to love his mother more. It allows Rick time to sort out his hurt and feelings from his anger and pain towards his father and to find inner peace within himself. Rick Braggs vivid descriptive words discribe in detail his mother's appearance. He describes his visit with his father which makes the reader enter into his world by the words he uses to describe the musty room, the old used books that was in the old cardboard box. He describes his brothers so vividly as muscular and more hardworking and more physically fit then him. He describes Sam as the solid one and compares him to Momma. Mark he describes as the wild and unpredictable like his father. He describes himself as a dreamer. The reader can identify with the characters as someone they knew or have known. This story was an informative book to read with many funny and emotional versions. I like the book because so much reference is given to a poor white boy from Alabama. It is a book that makes the reader aware of how sterotyping a child is wrong because of his appearance and his living conditions. Rick Bragg is an example how a little boy can grow up in his later years and show those who judged him when he was young that he could get out of the poor environment and be successful. There is a price for everything. I can't help but love and repect mama because she always put her children first,and her faith was strong. Poor old Papa, the reader can't help but feel sorry and pity for him. A man who mentally and physically gave up on himself before he could change his fate. He sold himself short. Rick's story was a reminder in so many ways, to look at our life and live it to the fullest. Beleive in our dreams, set goals and go for it. Don't let anyone make us feel that we can't do it. We can..

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    Posted April 1, 2012

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    Posted February 5, 2009

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    Posted April 29, 2013

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    Posted July 19, 2011

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    Posted July 23, 2009

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    Posted August 20, 2009

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