Customer Reviews for

All for a Song

Average Rating 4
( 33 )
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(13)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted June 5, 2013

    Allison Pittman is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors.

    Allison Pittman is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors.  Her stories are rich in history and character, and "All For a Song" is no exception.




    Dorothy Lynn Dunbar is a country girl who has grown up in a small town....but she dreams of more.  Not the big city necessarily but the feeling that she is destined to do more with her life.  She is engaged to the local preacher and her married with kids sister lives in the city.  When Dorothy visits her sister to create a wedding dress, she happens on a revival led by evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson, and connects with those associated with this movement....From that moment on her life changes - and she will never be the same.




    Set in the Roaring Twenties, this book will not disappoint...I highly recommend it.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 4, 2013

    Allison Pittman is one of my favorite authors and writes intrigu

    Allison Pittman is one of my favorite authors and writes intriguing stories about the real struggles we face. Her characters are flawed but likeable, the kind of people you'd like to be friends with. All for a Song is actually the second in a series of books that take place during the flapper days after World War II. ("Lilies in Moonlight" is the first in the series but they don't need to be read in order--they feature only the same time period; not the same characters or even the same setting.) I've been reading good historical Christian fiction for about the last 7 years but had never read anything that took place during the 1920s... and it was such an exciting time period for our country! So, yeah, I was excited.




    The book goes back and forth between present day and the past. The heroine, Dorothy Lynn Dunbar, is an immediately likable character, flaws and all. She's a talented musician in a small country town where women are not encouraged to exhibit those kinds of talents on stage. She's a preacher's daughter set to marry the new preacher, and it seems that the rest of her cozy little life is all mapped out for her. Still, she "yearns for life beyond these lines." God answers that honest yearning and she ends up on an adventure and, also, in a predicament. Dorothy's love interests (yes, interests) in the book are both very charming. I saw what she liked in each of them and understood the struggle she faced in deciding which life (and which man) she would choose.

    The author definitely weaves a wonderful story that grips the reader from the first chapter. You feel Dorothy's pain as she yearns for more than what she has and struggles to do what she sees as God's will. Morality and ideas were changing so quickly during that time in our history and you can really grasp the struggle people went through as they tried to find their place in a world that was very different than the one they grew up in.


    Another important character in the book is real-life Amy Semple McPherson who began the Four Square Church in the 1920s. She's a very interesting person, quite a phenomena, and I was intrigued to know more about her. She certainly did great things in her lifetime, though much of her life was quite colorful, to say the least.






    I highly recommend this book as well as Lilies in Moonlight!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2013

    A great story about finding who you are.

    Although some might not want to read a religious story, this story is about a girl deciding who she is and what she wants out of life. Reminded me of myself after graduation from high school.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 5, 2013

    This is the third book of Pittman's that I've read and I have to

    This is the third book of Pittman's that I've read and I have to say it is my favorite! Although I usually don't like books that go back and forth in time, this one didn't bother me because the flashbacks were directly tied to the present happenings. Pittman did a good job setting up the flashbacks so they made sense to the story line.

    The characters are very well-written. Lynnie as a young girl is believable with her desires to experience new things at odds with family obligations and expectations. I love the way she is able to maintain her integrity while tasting her dream. I was wondering throughout the entire book which pathway she would ultimately choose. I was inspired by Lynnie's courage in taking risks and in her fiance's faith for letting her go.

    On a side note, there is some humor in the book as well. I loved the fact that Pittman named the church pianist - from Lynnie's home church with the piano that has three missing keys - Rusty Keyes. I thought it was very funny!

    It is a little difficult to write a review about a book I loved as much as this one, so all I can say is to give this book a try. I don't think you will be disappointed. I highly recommend this book and it is one I will read again and again.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2013

    This book is very good and highly rated. The were two good parts

    This book is very good and highly rated. The were two good parts in it where, first, going from present to the past and back to the present. Especially adding a real famous person from the past. Dorothy Lynn had gone against her believes and her family by trusting Roland Lundi and Aimee McPherson to leave her pregnant sister to join Aimee McPherson's journey across America to tell people about the blessings of God, so she could find her brother and try to bring him home.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 8, 2013

    I loved this book. Allison Pittman is one of my favorite histori

    I loved this book. Allison Pittman is one of my favorite historical authors. This book belongs on my keeper shelf!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 2, 2014

    more from this reviewer

     I wasn't sure how I was going to like this book when I first st

     I wasn't sure how I was going to like this book when I first started it. I actually started and stopped this book, twice, before picking it up to read it again; not because it was boring, but because I wasn't sure how I would feel about it once I got into the story. I worried for nothing. This is the first book I've read written in this time period (I think), and I wasn't disappointed. From the moment Dorothy Lynn comes running home, I was captured. The story was impeccably written, switching from present day to past seamlessly. The descriptions of the characters and their emotions and feelings swept me away and I felt as if I was actually part of the story. 

    Dorothy Lynn Dunbar is an exciting character. She is simple and pure and honest and refreshing all at once. The author does a fantastic job of portraying Dorothy's emotions and feelings throughout the story. So much so that I could sympathize with her and could feel her confusion as she faces things she never dreamed she'd face. Roland Lundi and Brent Logan represent two sides of Dorothy's story. Each are equally intriguing, and provide fantastic secondary characters for Dorothy's interactions.

    This story, written as a kind of prodigal son story, has some deep truths imbedded within. I loved the scripture that was quoted at the beginning of each present day Dorothy's parts. As the author states, "All for a Song is ultimately a story of longing, of searching for what you think you lack." Cheering Dorothy on as she faces temptation head on with the Love of Christ at her side, weeping with her as she finds herself and the feeling of God's grace, and longing to return home with her will keep you turning the pages to find out what she does.

    I cannot wait to get my hands on the next book in the series, All for a Story, as soon as I can!

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  • Posted June 9, 2014

    I enjoyed Allison Pittman's previous novels so I read this one t

    I enjoyed Allison Pittman's previous novels so I read this one thinking about whether it would be good for my book club to read. There is so much to talk about! Yes, Dorothy Lynn has so much but she is feeling like she is walking into her mother's life and wants something more. When Roland comes along and offers her the chance to be a little more liberated, she takes it - but then wonders about what she might be leaving. I loved how the book flashed forward every so often into today. I also found the characters believable enough that I was frustrated with Dorothy Lynn's hesitations to assert herself - and I found it funny to read about her introduction to Chinese food. I'm looking forward to discussing this with my book club!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2013

    What would happen if you followed your dreams?

    Dorothy Dunbar loves her music and to dream. As a pastor's daughter, she has always lived her life in the small rural community doing everything that's expected of her. As she prepares to marry the new pastor, she longs for a chance to explore exotic places outside the confines of her small world. While visiting her sister in the big city, she meets a charismatic evangelist and her manager, who sees big things for this simple singer from the country. Dorothy embarks on a cross country journey with this ministry team where she discovers who she is and what God's plan is for her life. Lured by the bright lights and possibility of fame and fortunate, Dorothy must choose what she will do "all for a song."

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  • Posted September 2, 2013

    I enjoyed this book overall except for the chapters of Dorothy L

    I enjoyed this book overall except for the chapters of Dorothy Lynn at 107. These chapters were too melancholy for me. The story set in the Roaring Twenties was a nice change and I learned a lot about that era. I would read more by this author.

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  • Posted August 29, 2013

    This was the first book I read by Allison Pittman and I would wa

    This was the first book I read by Allison Pittman and I would want to read a couple more by her before I would decide on her writing skills. This book didn't do a lot for me. It was a little confusing because it switched back and forth between the young girl and the 104 year old lady. The suspense was in whether she was going to go back to her fiancee and live out her life in Heron's Nest or stay and try it in the big world of California. It was a nice read, well-written, but maybe a little simple. I'm not sure totally how to describe. Definitely not a favorite book for sure.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2013

    Enlighting

    Couldnt put it down

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  • Posted August 26, 2013

    Put it down, Pick it up, Put it down..throw it across the room w

    Put it down, Pick it up, Put it down..throw it across the room with frustration.




    Think the Great Gatsby. Roaring 20's. The author has a clear understanding and description of the time and space. This text will carry the reader away.




    Conviction to pray for our daughters. Take the journey of a lifetime with Dorothy Lynn. Hometown girl in a sleepy town, predictable life. Navigate the waters of good and bad choices and getting caught up in the chaos life choices bring. 




    One song will lead Dorothy Lynn far from home. The author will take the reader down an unpredictable path, a dangerous road where people's hearts are eaten up by greed and power doing their deeds in the name of the Lord. 




    A story of wisdom sown into the fabric of twentieth century American history. 




    A four star. 

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  • Posted August 21, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    This is an intriguing story set during the Roaring Twenties! Do

    This is an intriguing story set during the Roaring Twenties! Dorothy Lynn Dunbar is the daughter of a preacher and engaged to a preacher in her little town of Heron's Nest, but she wonders about the world outside. As her wedding approaches, she decides to visit her sister in St. Louis. There she sees a different way of life and meets Roland, who has movie star good looks and charm, and who is interested in her singing and songwriting. He works for Aimee Semple McPherson, a woman evangelist, and wants Dorothy to travel with them and sing for the crowds of people who come to the crusades. With the lure of fame and the chance at a different love turn her away from everything she's ever known?

    The Roaring Twenties was a decade of such change and I enjoyed learning more about it, from life after World War I to the changing fashions. I really liked the how the story went from modern-day Dorothy, who's 107, to what was happening back then, but the author's careful not to reveal which life she chooses until the very end! I was frustrated with some of Dorothy's choices, but I liked her overall, especially as her older self. I could definitely relate to her wanderlust. I enjoyed Allison's writing very much and look forward to checking out her other books!

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  • Posted August 17, 2013

    This was the first time reading a book by this author. The main

    This was the first time reading a book by this author. The main character, Dorothy, was the daughter of a small town preacher. She lives with her mother waiting for the day to arrive to marry Brent Logan, the replacement pastor. She loves life and loves spending time in the woods by her home where she can worship God and play her brother's guitar, but she can't shake the feeling as to what life is like outside Heron's Nest. Dorothy plans to go visit her sister in St.Louis, pick out her wedding dress and purchase new guitar strings. But is life in St Louis what she expected? Was it what she really wanted. I am looking forwarded to reading more books by this author.


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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2013

    I enjoyed this story, but I did find that I was left longing to

    I enjoyed this story, but I did find that I was left longing to learn more about Aimee Semple McPherson. I found for a historical fiction that it did not contain as many historical facts and information as I had hoped. For an entertaining read I enjoyed the book, but as a way to explore history in a fun way I found it lacking.

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  • Posted August 12, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Usually, opening a book to a present tense narration turns me of

    Usually, opening a book to a present tense narration turns me off. (I’m just not a fan of present tense.) All For a Song, by Allison Pittman, didn’t do that. I was drawn in so quickly by the charming narrative voice of 107-year-old Lynnie. Instantly, I cared about her.

    Then the story switches to an earlier period—the roaring 20s. Lynnie (Dorothy Lynn Dunbar) is 19 and tells the story about how her past unfolded.

    I cared about the characters, loved the vivid scenes, and appreciated the author’s ease of transitions between the present and past.

    The Christian influence in this book is evident, but not preachy, and shares the message of restoration, such as in the story of the Prodigal Son. (Luke 15:11-32.)


    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a copy free from Tyndale Publishers. I was not required to write a positive review. The options I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2013

    Fun book

    Fun book to read. Interesting perspectives. I would get a little bit bored in-between but overall it is a good book.

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  • Posted August 6, 2013

    This is a lovely story, well presented and touching. I enjoyed t

    This is a lovely story, well presented and touching. I enjoyed the two voices used to narrate this story. I enjoyed guessing what happens next and who each person could be. The detail in the descriptions is nicely done, especially in descriptions of the setting. Humor and emotion combine to keep the reader's interest. As mentioned in a note from the author, she explores issues of faith, and she does it in a lovely way in an easy-to-read story.

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  • Posted August 6, 2013

    Dorothy lives in a small town, is engaged to the preacher, and i

    Dorothy lives in a small town, is engaged to the preacher, and is bored with life. When she gets an opportunity to visit her sister in the city, she takes it, and gets a taste of city life. A meeting with female evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson leads to a trip to California while Dorothy plays her guitar for the evangelist's meetings.

    I thought this book was very good and liked the Roaring Twenties setting. The story does go back and forth from the 1920's to the present, where a 107 year old Dorothy remembers her life. I'm looking forward to the next book in the series.

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