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The Amazon Legion (Desert Called Peace Series #4)

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  • Posted August 21, 2011

    The Y Factor

    First, I like Kratman's writing style and I like this series. My problem with this volume was that it was very one dimensional and fits into the sub-sub-genre of a "basic training" story, except in this case - as my title states - female basic training (the Y chromosome factor). Very little goes on other than a description of the struggle and special circumstances for women of going through the rigors of that unique rite of passage, which, it being Balboa, is more akin to a combination of Parris Island & BUDS mixed with Roman Legionary practices for tyros. There is an introduction which takes place post-training, in which our protagonist seems oddly less grounded that one would expect from an individual who's been through both basic and leadership schools at that point, followed by the training sequences (80% of the novel), followed by a war sequence. What I'll call the political interplay of the earlier novels, which I enjoyed, was fairly limited. An OK read but it would be difficult to pick up if one were unfamiliar with the setting and the principal characters.

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  • Posted April 15, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Readers will enjoy Tom Kratman's deep homage to what a soldier sacrifices.

    Patricio Carrera gained revenge against the Salafi Ikhwan terrorists who slaughtered his first wife and their children. Living on his deceased wife's planet Balboa, he became Duque of the Legion del Cid mercenaries and took a second spouse Lourdes. Together they have several children.

    Independent Balboa's enemy the Tauran Union controls the critical Transitway between Terra Nova and Earth. Additionally the nuclear armed United Earth Peace Fleet orbits Carrerra's adopted planet. A second war seems imminent, but Balboa lacks the manpower and armaments to match the strength of their adversary. In fact with recruitment down considerably, Carrerra needs a new source for combat, which can only be the planet's female population. Thus he creates the Tercio Amazona Regiment.

    The fourth A Desert Called Peace science fiction thriller (see Carnifax and The Lotus Eater) is a unique entry as there is no incredible military heroics and glory for the future history books; but instead the story line focuses on female grunts trained as lionesses preparing to defend their cubs at personal cost. The stars are the M and M warriors Maria and Marta who tell much of the tale as they learn to fight ruthlessly towards the enemy but compassion for their side. Readers who appreciate a deep look at preparing for war against much more powerful foes will enjoy Tom Kratman's deep homage to what a soldier sacrifices.

    Harriet Klausner

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