Customer Reviews for

American Creation: Triumphs and Tragedies at the Founding of the Republic

Average Rating 4
( 42 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(16)

4 Star

(14)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Different perspectives, provoking thought: pithy!

While I have read and enjoyed many books about the early years of our country's life, this one stood out for me.

Certainly, Ellis' easy reading style was a contributing factor. Nevertheless, the baseline concept and its delivery were the most significant reasons I t...
While I have read and enjoyed many books about the early years of our country's life, this one stood out for me.

Certainly, Ellis' easy reading style was a contributing factor. Nevertheless, the baseline concept and its delivery were the most significant reasons I thoroughly enjoyed this book. After providing a cogent "first year" foundation, Ellis outlined five events and the dialogue, issues, and history that led up to them; and why they were, and are, important to understand. These five watershed events were compelling for me, as Ellis painted the pictures: the winter at Valley Forge, the birthing of the Constitution, a first treaty with a Native American nation, the early years of infighting and beginning of the two-party system, and finally the Louisiana Purchase.

While other authors have dealt with some of these events and people before, Ellis brings in new and fresh viewpoints of interest today. The challenges of federal versus state governance are certainly of relevance considering the challenges facing states and the federal government to work together to resolve the devastating financial crisis we are in. A significant asset for the US throughout its history-its large space and the impact it has had on people's passions and desires-again another current topic considering that large landscape now through a lens of water shortages and environmental pressures. In addition, Ellis provided new insights for students of Washington, Madison, Adams, Jefferson, Hamilton, and others. However, he also brought in less studied players, such as, Alexander McGillivray. Overall, as Ellis stated in The Founding chapter: "The American founding was, and still is, a group portrait."

A pithy read, prompting interesting dialogues! Nicely painted!

posted by Ceal52 on February 23, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Not as good as Founding Brothers

This was an OK book, but I did not think it was as good as Founding Brothers. As an historian it told me little new. It would probably read better to a casual reader.

posted by SAM1954 on September 7, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 14 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted February 23, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Different perspectives, provoking thought: pithy!

    While I have read and enjoyed many books about the early years of our country's life, this one stood out for me.

    Certainly, Ellis' easy reading style was a contributing factor. Nevertheless, the baseline concept and its delivery were the most significant reasons I thoroughly enjoyed this book. After providing a cogent "first year" foundation, Ellis outlined five events and the dialogue, issues, and history that led up to them; and why they were, and are, important to understand. These five watershed events were compelling for me, as Ellis painted the pictures: the winter at Valley Forge, the birthing of the Constitution, a first treaty with a Native American nation, the early years of infighting and beginning of the two-party system, and finally the Louisiana Purchase.

    While other authors have dealt with some of these events and people before, Ellis brings in new and fresh viewpoints of interest today. The challenges of federal versus state governance are certainly of relevance considering the challenges facing states and the federal government to work together to resolve the devastating financial crisis we are in. A significant asset for the US throughout its history-its large space and the impact it has had on people's passions and desires-again another current topic considering that large landscape now through a lens of water shortages and environmental pressures. In addition, Ellis provided new insights for students of Washington, Madison, Adams, Jefferson, Hamilton, and others. However, he also brought in less studied players, such as, Alexander McGillivray. Overall, as Ellis stated in The Founding chapter: "The American founding was, and still is, a group portrait."

    A pithy read, prompting interesting dialogues! Nicely painted!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2007

    Ellis hits home run again

    Well, after Founding Brothers and His Excellency, I was wondering if there was a bunch more to know about this generation. With Creation - YES. I'm almost through the book. Well-written, poised, insightful. I can't put it down. Highly recommend.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2013

    Or y frd

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2013

    Great read

    I have always liked Ellis books and this one is no different. This is a great read and does a good job at explaining the trials the Founding Fathers had when creating this great country.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2008

    very insightful

    Anybody who has read Joseph Ellis before knows how much research and analysis is put into his work. This book is no exception. A collection of narratives regarding a few of the most important episodes of our founding years, which includes a brief review of the war and the winter at Valley Forge, the debate over the Constitution, the creation of political parties, post war Indian affairs and the LA purchase. This was a good read, but I found his scholarly tone to sometimes be somewhat less 'accessible' unlike David McCullough which reads like a novel. I still enjoyed it and recommend this book to anybody and everybody interested in this generation of Americans and period of our history.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2007

    A fine read

    Ellis follows up 'Founding Brothers' with another selection about the creation of our nation. He defines this creation period as 1775-1803 and uses six different stories or moments in time to demonstrate how our country resulted from luck and good fortune as much as having outstanding leaders. I enjoyed the book, but not as much as Founding Brothers (an outstanding book). A few of the stories weren't all that interesting and several times I flatly disagreed with some of Ellis' conclusions. For instance, early in the book, Ellis states several times that the founding fathers took certain actions that flew in the face of republican principals. But his conclusion is based on the assumption that American citizen¿s participation or responsibilities in helping to establish the new nation stopped at the door of individual self-interest. Where Ellis sees duplicity, he should have recognized that sometimes there are issues that require action at the expense of self-interest. He certainly understood this issue, for example, in his description of Jefferson¿s conduct during the Louisiana Purchase and how Jefferson specifically chose to avoid addressing the slavery issue (despite Jefferson¿s public abhorrence of slavery), so it is strange that his understanding was not consistent throughout the book. Still, I recommend the book and look forward to his next subject.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 14 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1