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American Fascists: The Christian Right and the War on America

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

A reviewer

American Fascists: The Christian Right and the War on America, is a powerful expose of the Christian Right and its attempts to create a new America ruled by them and their extreme and dangerous beliefs. Hedges exposes the dominionist movement, as he calls it, and the wa...
American Fascists: The Christian Right and the War on America, is a powerful expose of the Christian Right and its attempts to create a new America ruled by them and their extreme and dangerous beliefs. Hedges exposes the dominionist movement, as he calls it, and the war it is waging on American freedom and democracy. Dominionism, he says, is a movement which takes its name from a chapter in Genesis, and desires to use the Christian religion to gain political power on a scale never before seen. I became especially interested when he exposed the dangerous conversion aspirations of Dr. D. James Kennedy and his Evangelism Explosion program. I, for various reasons, have watched Kennedy¿s program, and I have thus gained an insight into his politics and aspirations. Hedges thus added an extra dimension to what I already knew helping me to understand further how dangerous Dr. Kennedy¿s beliefs are. The fight for Creationism to take precedence over evolution is a major issue in our nation, and it has been for decades. Hedges, like others, believes that the evidence to support the various claims of literal biblical creation is suspect. However, the central theme of the chapter revolves around the laughable Creation Museum in Kentucky, which has displays that purport to show the dinosaurs being on Noah¿s Ark and a family without God being in chaos. Two of the more disturbing parts of this book are the chapters on the war-like language used by the movement to call their flocks into service and the chapter on televangelism. Hedges finds that the deliberate combination of Christian symbols and national symbols are a step in the direction of a Christian fascism, made worse by the rhetoric that characterizes current day America as being involved in a cultural and religious war, the Christians being under siege, which is a claim that Hedges wholeheartedly disputes. Televangelism, he claims, is used to ¿seduce and encourage us to walk away from the dwindling, less exciting collectives that protect and nurture us. They have mastered television¿s imperceptible, slowly induced hypnosis.¿ To support all of these claims and charges that Hedges makes, he uses his own experiences with the dominionist movement as well as testimonials and interviews with those who have experience with dominionism. In the first chapter, he says that the Bible is one of the ¿great ethical and moral documents of our age.¿ He also says that to not know the Bible is to be in some way illiterate, as the Bible has had a profound effect upon world civilization. Hedges claims, however, will probably only be received openly by those who are not of the fundamentalist or conservative persuasion. Ultimately, American Fascists has the effect of preaching to the choir. That, however, does not mean it is not a powerful work. After reading the book, I felt just that much more passionate about the things which Hedges describes. This is definitely a must-read book.

posted by Anonymous on March 29, 2007

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Most Helpful Critical Review

5 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

Christianity is always a scapegoat

Mr.Hedges proves the true worth of an education at Harvard Divinty School by attempting to prove the continued existence of Christianity is only thru fascism. How quaint! His writings are semantical twisters,proving people are able to talk out of both sides of their mou...
Mr.Hedges proves the true worth of an education at Harvard Divinty School by attempting to prove the continued existence of Christianity is only thru fascism. How quaint! His writings are semantical twisters,proving people are able to talk out of both sides of their mouths at one time.He is an humble child from rural upstate NY (this apparently makes him a greater authority). Mr.Hedges writes of the many bloody battles found in the Bible,but with the exception of a few passing references,he almost totally sets the blame for all sins in the New Testament. Once again,revisionism is rife- the Old Testament was the bloodiest, sir. Jesus came in peace. The absurd notion in this book that Pat Robertson and others are more evil and fascistic as Christians than atheists is worthy of the confused logic this writer brings to this book. This was what communism attempted to do-rip belief and faith from people's lives in order to make them feel hopeless and down trodden.Spread doubt and guilt.Mr. Hedges follows the Communist path here. Do not waste your time reading this book it is more or less a work of fiction and opinion on the author's part.

posted by Anonymous on January 22, 2007

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    Posted January 19, 2012

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