Customer Reviews for

American Theocracy: The Peril and Politics of Radical Religion, Oil, and Borrowed Money in the 21st Century

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2008

    Timely

    With the pervasive influence of the credit market industry, religious right, and oil industry in the American process, we are heading for a huge downfall, according to the prophetic economic and political commentator Kevin Phillips. His timely prose compares our desires for a latter-day Manifest Destiny in the Middle East--a mistake tried by the motherland, Britain--to an ambitious empirical notion of both overreach and grandiose notions that we are the 'chosen people.' Like his other book Wealth and Democracy, he singles out the threat of foreign banks and lenders destroying asset accreditation and ballooning our current-account deficit, especially to those of China--the next superpower if we do not stop our reckless ways. He singles out the peculiar nature of the religiosity, fierceness, and fecundity of the Scots-Irish, who seem to be the winners of the culture wars. He seems to recant in some ways of his Cousins Wars where he said that the traditional High Church Anglicans where the winners against Cromwell's lower churchers. Continuing on his religious and ethnic themes of politics, he notices that the Civil War culture of 'The Southernization of America' hasn't ended, much to the naiveties of liberal secularists. The winners, as he laments and grudgingly admires, are the profoundly tough and volatile culture of the Scots-Irish, who are among the finest warriors the world has ever seen. Also included among the losers of Anglo-America's sphere of influence, as he continues was Spain, France and the Netherlands, alongside the Irish, Native Americans, African Americans and the Germans. I would include the Mexicans, as well, because of the fact that many came from French and Spanish bloodlines. Of course, that may be an issue if immigration issues continue.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2009

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