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Customer Reviews for

Americans in Paris: Life and Death Under Nazi Occupation

Average Rating 3
( 21 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(5)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2010

    Good read

    There was a fascinating person in this who was really pretty much unknown even now to prominent French people - despite the fact that he hosted the wedding of Wallis Simpson and Edward VIII at his chateau in Vichy France, and then offered it to the Americans to use as an embassy when the US declared war on Germany and the diplomats had to go to "Free France". Really interesting and well researched accounts of the English literary scene (incl. Joyce, Hemingway, etc.) supported by Sylvia Beach - a page turner. Does this want to become a documentary? So full of details we usually miss out on in accounts of wartime Europe. Brits and Americans put up by Nazis in luxury spa hotels in Vittel...

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 13, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent, provocative writing and story telling.

    This book is essentially a background piece to the obvious larger story of WW II but as it's own story it should be regarded as required reading in American schools on the vagaries of war and patriotism. Each and every character is brought back to life in an enlightening, provocative manner of writing. This is top notch story telling and the author constructed an easy, well connected flow from chapter to chapter which is hard to do when there is so much information provided. While a little heavy on names from time to time, this book is a definite page turner, a reading late into a weeknight book, even for a non-retiree. Confidently offering five stars for this book, even the dust jacket is beautiful.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 24, 2011

    Awe Inspiring Inside Look at Nazi Paris

    If it weren't a true story, this book would win Fiction of the Year - its that good. I can't imagine how Glass does it. Why these people, these families, these years? Unshakably documented truths reveal a level of conviction, daring, courage, and selflessness that should be rewarded - but, no. There are cads, con-men, Nazi incompetents, and French traitors - and stalwart, unsung American heroes. This book led me to another, from his bibliography; "No Passport For Paris", by Alice Leone Moats - the central figure in one of the most tense real-life spy episodes in the book.(Another 5-star effort)Hemingway fans will be thrilled with the chapters about Sylvia Beach and Shakespeare & Co. - hanging out with James Joyce and hiding out from the SS. Vichy France was surely a snake-pit, but this is the only inside look at how bad it really was for Americans (other than shot-down fliers).Hitchcock and Speilberg wish they had a script this thrilling, and historically accurate - and an ending this heartbreaking.
    Five stars aren't enough...

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 20, 2010

    "American In Paris" by Charles Glass

    "American In Paris" is an engaging review of a World War Two period not often studied by students of history. It details the time period that Paris and Northern France were occupied by Nazi Germany and, more specifically, how it impacted United States citizens living in France, first with their country being neutral, and then, after Pearl Harbor, committed to the war and the Allied cause.

    The research by Charles Glass is extensive and most detailed and his descriptions of key Americans who chose to move with Nazi collaborartion or, on the other hand, support the resistance, is very descript.

    However, some of his characters and their relationship with others are at times difficult to follow, as the reader must remember multiple connections between individuals.

    Foe someone interested in history I would rate it as a first class review of an earlier phase of World War Two and highly recommend it's reading.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 28, 2014

    Great treatment of the subject.  Many details on the "cast

    Great treatment of the subject.  Many details on the "cast of characters" who populated the City of Light during a dark time.  One quibble:  Glass makes a common mistake when referring to German Army troops as the "Wehrmacht".  That was the collective term for all German armed forces - Luftwaffe, Kriegsmarine, and das Heer .  The German army was actually "das Heer".  As we are now discovering, not all the French were members of the Resistance.  Belatedly they're acknowledging that too many were collaborators.Like the old joke:
    Q:  what did the mayor of Paris say to the German commander when Axis troops marched into the city?
    A:  a table for 10,000, monsieur?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2012

    Too narrow

    More wanted cultural statement than any depth in history

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 11, 2011

    A Bit Too Much

    I really liked how this book started out. Having been to Paris, I was amazed to hear how the Nazi occupation started in this area. But after that the book kind of lost me. He uses experiences from a lot of people to illustrate Paris during World War 2. I had a hard time keeping track of everybody and I ended up just not liking the book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2013

    dull account of great story

    dull account of great story

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted March 7, 2010

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    Posted January 27, 2012

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    Posted September 15, 2011

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    Posted February 11, 2012

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    Posted November 5, 2010

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    Posted January 21, 2010

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    Posted July 24, 2010

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    Posted January 28, 2010

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    Posted May 17, 2011

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    Posted September 3, 2010

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    Posted January 29, 2012

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