Customer Reviews for

An Audience for Einstein

Average Rating 4
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted October 26, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Mechele R. Dillard for TeensReadToo.com

    Young Percival Marlowe was a typical science geek; elderly Professor Marlowe is a Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist who needs more time to complete all of the brilliant projects he has yet to share with the world. Unable to find a way to retrieve his own youth, Marlowe backs the project of neurosurgeon Carl Dorning, hoping but never truly believing that Dorning's revolutionary technique of transplanting memories will prove successful by the time Marlowe's rapidly-approaching death arrives. <BR/><BR/>Dorning knows that he only has one shot at transplanting Marlowe's essence, and realizes that the Professor doesn't have much time. When he meets a young homeless boy, Miguel Sanchez, all of the pieces begin to fall into place. But, when Marlowe finally realizes that this procedure may actually happen, he begins to question the moral implications of Dorning's potential success: "You've wrestled with the procedures and won, but not with the long term consequences, Dorning. Don't you see? If you're successful, you might have found a unique way to create a new class of slaves" (p. 42). <BR/><BR/>Mark Wakely's first novel tackles some big issues, forcing the reader to weigh the value of the life of a genius of science against that of an illiterate street urchin. Is the potential value of continuing a life already proven invaluable to mankind worth the sacrifice of one homeless boy who doesn't even know his own age? Or is the unique spirit Miguel brings to humanity more important than all of the equations and theories a second life for Professor Marlowe could offer? <BR/><BR/>2006 EPPIE Award <BR/><BR/>2003 Authorlink New Author Award for Science Fiction <BR/><BR/>2002/03 Fountainhead Productions National Writing Contest Winner <BR/><BR/>2003 Writemovies.com International Writing Competition, Finalist

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2007

    a reviewer

    Young Percival Marlowe was a typical science geek elderly Professor Marlowe is a Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist who needs more time to complete all of the brilliant projects he has yet to share with the world. Unable to find a way to retrieve his own youth, Marlowe backs the project of neurosurgeon Carl Dorning, hoping but never truly believing that Dorning¿s revolutionary technique of transplanting memories will prove successful by the time Marlowe¿s rapidly-approaching death arrives. Dorning knows that he only has one shot at transplanting Marlowe¿s essence, and realizes that the Professor doesn¿t have much time. When he meets a young homeless boy, Miguel Sanchez, all of the pieces begin to fall into place. But, when Marlowe finally realizes that this procedure may actually happen, he begins to question the moral implications of Dorning¿s potential success: ¿You¿ve wrestled with the procedures and won, but not with the long term consequences, Dorning. Don¿t you see? If you¿re successful, you might have found a unique way to create a new class of slaves¿ (p. 42). Mark Wakely¿s first novel tackles some big issues, forcing the reader to weigh the value of the life of a genius of science against that of an illiterate street urchin. Is the potential value of continuing a life already proven invaluable to mankind worth the sacrifice of one homeless boy who doesn¿t even know his own age? Or is the unique spirit Miguel brings to humanity more important than all of the equations and theories a second life for Professor Marlowe could offer? 2006 EPPIE Award 2003 Authorlink New Author Award for Science Fiction 2002/03 Fountainhead Productions National Writing Contest Winner 2003 Writemovies.com International Writing Competition, Finalist **Reviewed by: Mechele R. Dillard

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2007

    Thoughtful book

    We read this in class. It reminded me of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens or maybe Flowers for Algernon, another book we read. Wakely's book is about a memory transfer from a dying old genius to a young uneducated boy, but it's more than that. It's about all the amazing discoveries being made in medical science such as cloning and stem cell research, and it questions how wise we really are to play God with those discoveries, if we really know what we're doing and what the long term consequences might be. I also liked the two characters Miguel (the young boy) and Percival (the old professor). An Audience for Einstein is a very thoughtful book that I can recommend.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1