Customer Reviews for

And the Mountains Echoed

Average Rating 4
( 719 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

71 out of 80 people found this review helpful.

Khaled Hosseini's writing is masterfully meticulous, poetic and

Khaled Hosseini's writing is masterfully meticulous, poetic and enchanting.
He gives his characters depth and beauty in a way that few authors are able.
The first half of this particular novel is brilliant, rich in detail and word; It reads like poetry.
In the second...
Khaled Hosseini's writing is masterfully meticulous, poetic and enchanting.
He gives his characters depth and beauty in a way that few authors are able.
The first half of this particular novel is brilliant, rich in detail and word; It reads like poetry.
In the second half of the novel, Hosseini's intentions became too obvious, which was frustrating for me because in his other novels, he was able to subtly weave in what he wanted the reader to take from his novel. That said, and before I continue, I must say that despite this, the book is still powerful and still worthy of acclaim. This book touches upon the diaspora of Afghan citizens; there is no distinct main character - instead, each story is an account which represents the lives, hurdles and world perceptions of people who have fled Afghanistan, remained in Afghanistan, returned to Afghanistan, even touching upon Narco-terrorism and Taliban restrictions and ramifications. I found that several characters were essential only to the story in that they filled a slot where Hosseini intended to teach his reader. This is commendable for a writer and a novel however, the stories grew less heartening as the book went on. While a good writer knows that a happy ending can ruin a book, and I was pleased Hosseini did not travel this route, I was dissatisfied. I understand that that could have been Hosseini's intention as the plight of Afghanistan is heartrendingly dissatisfying. I still feel that Hosseini could have done better justice in the end of the book. His final narrator, Pari, was not as endearing or as instrumental to the story than others in it were. I was disappointed that she was gifted with closing such a massive, generational story. The frequent, interminable shifting of characters (none returned to) grew tiresome. Hosseini is gifted at drawing his readers in, so the changes did not ruin the story, but certainly took from my captivation. Nit-picking aside, I would recommend this novel with high praise for its poetic nature and educational undertones. Hosseini's writing is incomparable and I only give it such a tedious review because I know how capable he is. I will forever be a fan, buying and cherishing anything he publishes.    

posted by Bookwoorm on May 23, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

17 out of 58 people found this review helpful.

This book seems okay

I can see why some people would like this book, but it really wasn't for me. I don't really like emotional books, so this one wasn't so great. It just reminded me of one of the books my fourth grade teacher would like. I also read another book, years ago, that was simil...
I can see why some people would like this book, but it really wasn't for me. I don't really like emotional books, so this one wasn't so great. It just reminded me of one of the books my fourth grade teacher would like. I also read another book, years ago, that was similar to this one. It was also kind of half poem, and had a complicated message that has to do with emotions. It was called The Underneath. Anyway, I would not reread this book, because, like I said, it is too emotional.

posted by 16970216 on May 26, 2013

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Page 1 of 36
  • Posted May 23, 2013

    Khaled Hosseini's writing is masterfully meticulous, poetic and

    Khaled Hosseini's writing is masterfully meticulous, poetic and enchanting.
    He gives his characters depth and beauty in a way that few authors are able.
    The first half of this particular novel is brilliant, rich in detail and word; It reads like poetry.
    In the second half of the novel, Hosseini's intentions became too obvious, which was frustrating for me because in his other novels, he was able to subtly weave in what he wanted the reader to take from his novel. That said, and before I continue, I must say that despite this, the book is still powerful and still worthy of acclaim. This book touches upon the diaspora of Afghan citizens; there is no distinct main character - instead, each story is an account which represents the lives, hurdles and world perceptions of people who have fled Afghanistan, remained in Afghanistan, returned to Afghanistan, even touching upon Narco-terrorism and Taliban restrictions and ramifications. I found that several characters were essential only to the story in that they filled a slot where Hosseini intended to teach his reader. This is commendable for a writer and a novel however, the stories grew less heartening as the book went on. While a good writer knows that a happy ending can ruin a book, and I was pleased Hosseini did not travel this route, I was dissatisfied. I understand that that could have been Hosseini's intention as the plight of Afghanistan is heartrendingly dissatisfying. I still feel that Hosseini could have done better justice in the end of the book. His final narrator, Pari, was not as endearing or as instrumental to the story than others in it were. I was disappointed that she was gifted with closing such a massive, generational story. The frequent, interminable shifting of characters (none returned to) grew tiresome. Hosseini is gifted at drawing his readers in, so the changes did not ruin the story, but certainly took from my captivation. Nit-picking aside, I would recommend this novel with high praise for its poetic nature and educational undertones. Hosseini's writing is incomparable and I only give it such a tedious review because I know how capable he is. I will forever be a fan, buying and cherishing anything he publishes.    

    71 out of 80 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2013

    Khaled is such a wonderful storyteller. I read Kite Runner and A

    Khaled is such a wonderful storyteller. I read Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns years ago and still remember the characters so well. I was so happy to read his latest offering and was not disappointed! Beautiful!

    33 out of 41 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 28, 2013

    This story describes the beauty and essence of Afghanistan that

    This story describes the beauty and essence of Afghanistan that makes us all fall in love with the country. Hosseini explores the relationships between parents, their children, extended family and friends in such a way that no one else can. I immediately fell in love with these characters. I sympathized with them, celebrated with them, and explored their relationships with them. I really enjoyed this book and can't say enough good things about it! Hosseini's writing style is elegant and beautiful. He brings beauty to a country that has been consumed by war and violence for so many years. I love reading his books because I learn a little more about the culture every time, and I find it very fascinating!

    31 out of 40 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 2, 2013

    Another triumph for Khaled Hosseini. It was worth the six year w

    Another triumph for Khaled Hosseini. It was worth the six year wait. I couldn't
    imagine that I'd like a book as much as I did his last two novels,  but indeed
    I did. This beautifully crafted, multi-generational story made me weep while
    I was reading it. I  felt like weeping again
      when I finished it; I wish it had been longer. One of those rare
    books that I will think about for a long while after I finish it.
    Highly recommended.

    24 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2013

    Wow!

    This was better even than his other books and they were top notch. This author weaves such incredible stories into one masterpiece. I become so entwined in the lives of his characters that I hate to have the book end! I will always have my eye watching out for Khaled Hosseini and hopefully he is working on another breath-taking story!

    19 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2013

    This book seems okay

    I can see why some people would like this book, but it really wasn't for me. I don't really like emotional books, so this one wasn't so great. It just reminded me of one of the books my fourth grade teacher would like. I also read another book, years ago, that was similar to this one. It was also kind of half poem, and had a complicated message that has to do with emotions. It was called The Underneath. Anyway, I would not reread this book, because, like I said, it is too emotional.

    17 out of 58 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2013

    this is one of his best. i couldn't put the book down i felt lov

    this is one of his best. i couldn't put the book down i felt love, empathy,& sympathy for his characters and the people of afghanistan. at the end of the book i cried i wanted it to continue another 500 pages. this is a 5 star book. i just wish he would write a book more often, 6 years is too long to wait for his superior storytelling.

    16 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2013

    Gorgeous

    This is a beautiful, raw, authentic story of life and of connections. I wept. Wonderful novel.

    16 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2013

    Disappointing

    I am a huge fan of the author. In fact "A Thousand Splendid Suns" is one of my favorite books. I have also read "Kite Runner" and now this book. The book is really just a series of stories put together in a way I thought didn't fit that well. I thought it ran a little dry from time to time. The descriptions are beautiful as always though. I do still look forward to whatever Mr. Hosseini has to offer us.

    14 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2013

    Left Looking for More

    The story is a good one, with characters intertwined throughout the book. At times I found it difficult to follow, as the story would jump around between locations, periods in time, and characters. I felt like there were too many loose ends at the end of the book. For me, there were too many characters with unresolved issues.

    13 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 28, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    And The Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini This book is best d

    And The Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini

    This book is best described as a series of short stories, intertwined by the fact that the characters are somehow related and going from 1949 until present.

    The first story is about two siblings, Abdullah and Pari, Saboor's children. Their mother died in childbirth when Pari was born and they shared a link that was quite strong. After starting the book with a story told by Saboor about a din who stole children in poor villages, Sabbor sells Pari to Suleiman and Nabhi Wahdati in Kabul, a rich couple.

    Saboor Marries Parwana as his second wife and the next story is about how Parwana and her twin sister, Masoona share their life. Masoona is the beautiful one, whereas Parwana is just plain: so at age 17 Parwana pushes her twin sister off a tree, thus crippling her. Parwana is thus forced to take care of her sister until Masoona frees her from her duty so she can marry Saboor.

    Another story is about Nabi, Masoona and Parwana older brother, who finds employment with the Wahdati in Kabul as a chauffeur and cook. Come to find out, Suleiman Wahdati was in love with Nabi, but because that was forbidden, Suleiman just hires him for his company. As Suleiman has a stroke, his wife abandons him with the daughter, Pari, whom they bought from Saboor, and Nabi is forced to care for Suleiman until he dies; thus their love story is told.

    Another story is about cousins Idris and Timus, who were neighbors of the Wahdati's in Kabul. They come to Kabul in 2002 to reclaim their old house, which they can rent to the foreigners for a lot of money. Idris meets a little girl at a Kabul hospital - Roshana - who needs a surgery to heal her from an ax wound to her head. Idris is a physician himself and he bonds with the little girl, promising to take her to the US where he works to have her surgery. Unfortunately once he goes back to the US, he just forgets about Afghanistan and the girl.

    Another story is about Nila Wahdati and her adoptive daughter, Pari as they live and grow in Paris. Nila is beautiful and a poet; she has plenty of lovers and makes Pari feel guilty. They even share a lover and Pari has to take care of her mother until she kills herself.

    Another story is about the warlords of the new Afghanistan.

    Another story is about a Greek plastic surgeon, Dr. Markos Varvaris, who's from Tinos, an island in Greece. He is currently inhabiting the Wahdati's residence in Kabul which is now owned by Nabi. It tells the story of a friend of his, Thalia who was the daughter of his mother's best friend. Thalia was abandoned in Tinos because she had a terrible disfiguration on her face and she grows up like a sister and ends up taking care of Markos' mother.

    The last story is about Pari, daughter of Abdullah and Sultana. Pari is so named after Abdulla's sister, the one he lost in Kabul. Pari has dreamt of that sister from birth and is finally contacted by her aunt, Pari, who wishes to visit her. The aunt found out about her because Dr. Markos called her to let her know her uncle, Nabi, had instructed she should be found. It's from this that she learns who she really is and is able to contact her brother who now lives in northern California. Unfortunately her brother has had a stroke and can't recognize his sister.

    The stories are written either from the first or third person point of view - a thing I found annoying - and each one is more depressing than the prior one. I love Mr. Hosseini's prose and his ability to story tell, but I wish he found something more pleasant to write about.

    11 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2013

    Grow up.

    This communication is for book reviews and to guide others that enjoy reading with intelligent feedback for those of you that feel the need to mock and make fun of real intelligence, grow up!!!!!

    10 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2013

    Fabulous.

    Fabulous.

    9 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2013

    Khaled Hosseini books

    Hard to follow . Jumped around. Not as good as his other books.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2013

    Disappointed

    Not nearly the book as the first two. I was so excited when I saw this book on the shelves. I rushed back home and purchased it for my Nook. What a disappointed. Save you money.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 24, 2013

    Highy recommended

    Khaled Hosseini has a keen ability to weave characters throughout his book making this reader uncertain how the people were connected to each other. But he is kind enough to use descriptions almost verbatim in order for us to distinguish how they fit into his story. So many of his sentences read as if they were a poem. I am honored to have read another book he has written and am only saddened that the story ended. I will surely purchase anything this author has penned.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2013

    highly recommend

    As I got within the last few pages of this book I finally figured out what I wanted to say in this review. Mr. Hosseini has a hat trick now. If you don't know what a hat trick is, It's three goals in one game by the same person. I've read all three of his books and I anxiously await another. He describes his feelings with lines that make me sit back and think " I've felt like that but didn't know how to express it" A good read makes any book seem too short. There are sad parts in this book but so is there in real life. Well worth the read.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2013

    I have read all of Mr.Hosseini's book and loved them all. He is

    I have read all of Mr.Hosseini's book and loved them all. He is a gifted writer who can take you to these far away places as though you were actually there. His characters are so real, so human. I have to say though, that since there are so many of them, it is hard to fully connect the way I did with the characters in previous books.  It's a must read none the less.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2013

    Attention

    Please stop telling the ending of books!!! That is a book report, not a review. This is not cool, people. Would like to read the book without knowing important details. Two stars since you spelled everything correctly.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2013

    I love Hosseini and looked forward to the publication of this bo

    I love Hosseini and looked forward to the publication of this book. I absolutely loved the first half of the book. It was typical of his previous efforts. The second half, however, caused me great disappointment. It told another story and I kept waiting for it to be joined up and fitted into the story told in the first half. Quite simply, it didn't. As a resulted I found this book quite mystifying. Its disjointedness really freaked me out. I don't know if it was the intent of Hosseini to tell two stories. It was ias if he was writing two short stories. Yes, there was a connection but a very tenuous and unsatisfying one.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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