Customer Reviews for

Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior

Average Rating 4
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(29)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Fantastic, whether you agree with slaughterhouses or not

I knew about Temple Grandin, but I had never seen her or her books. Then I read this. It was really eye-opening for me. There was not a single page that didn't teach me something new, which is a very rare event for me. Heck, I read 'A Brief History of Time' and didn't l...
I knew about Temple Grandin, but I had never seen her or her books. Then I read this. It was really eye-opening for me. There was not a single page that didn't teach me something new, which is a very rare event for me. Heck, I read 'A Brief History of Time' and didn't learn as much as I have reading this. For everything I've read about autism (and experienced), I still received new insights into the good and bad involved (as well as the strange, like opiates), as well as theories behind it. Then, of course, is the stuff about animals. Now THAT was eye-opening. There was so much about how animals think and behave that I never would have even thought of thinking of (probably inattentional blindness). But it all makes sense. It has made me better able to understand animals, which is vital for people to know nowadays, now that we rely on machines more and animals less. But in fact, it's at least partially repaired my relationship with my cat, who would generally avoid me and my bear-hugs. Now I pet her and understand her and the way she works better, so I can work with her instead of against her. There's just so much to learn in this book that I don't think you even should be allowed to have animals without this book. Oh, and by the way, death is an inherent part of life. Death happens all the time. Just because we cause it (in the times that we do) doesn't make it any more wrong. As much as people argue that breeding animals to eat them is unnatural, humans have been doing it for centuries. And anyways, it'd be impossible to not do anything to any animals. We are a part of their world just as much as they are part of ours. The best we can do is to change what we can, and help them with what we cannot change. More animals live when we love and understand them than if we we stop breeding them or release them into the wild. The difference between you and Temple Grandin is not that she assists brutal murders of animals and you don't. It's just that she does the little things to change our and their world for the better, and you don't. Sorry if that's a little harsh, but Temple Grandin is a visionary among animal researchers, and if you're too stubborn to read how to better communicate and co-exist with animals, then you obviously don't care about animals as much you think.

posted by Anonymous on September 22, 2008

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

NOT what's expected...

For the true animal lover/healer this book leaves out something that's needed most...mutual respect and compassion for EVERY animal. She tends to talk to much about how to better the ability to get cattle around within the boundries of the slaughter fields that they ar...
For the true animal lover/healer this book leaves out something that's needed most...mutual respect and compassion for EVERY animal. She tends to talk to much about how to better the ability to get cattle around within the boundries of the slaughter fields that they are made to live in. What's compassionate about that? I agree, everyone interested in healing animals needs to read this book, and then move on from it and find another way to create an actual world where all animals are loved and cared for. I respect her for her own journey it's just not how so many animal care workers feel.

posted by Anonymous on October 13, 2005

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2005

    NOT what's expected...

    For the true animal lover/healer this book leaves out something that's needed most...mutual respect and compassion for EVERY animal. She tends to talk to much about how to better the ability to get cattle around within the boundries of the slaughter fields that they are made to live in. What's compassionate about that? I agree, everyone interested in healing animals needs to read this book, and then move on from it and find another way to create an actual world where all animals are loved and cared for. I respect her for her own journey it's just not how so many animal care workers feel.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2006

    Great for anyone with sleep problems

    The best thing about this book was that it was so dry and boring that it helped me fall asleep on a nightly basis. Three pages and my eyes would start closing. Being a counselor and an animal lover, I thought this book would be extremely interesting and insightful however, I felt like I was reading one of my psychology textbooks. Take this one out of the library. Don't waste your money on it.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2006

    Designer of death

    I almost bought this book, but borrowed a copy to read. I have no intention of contributing to the income of a designer of slaugherhouses. Temple Grandin can claim no love or understanding of animals if she has studied their killing in such detail. There is no such thing as humane slaughter. If slaughter houses had glass walls, you would all be vegetarian. Unfortunately, Grandin still enjoys eating animals, and exploits them further by writing about the 'slaughter experience.' It isn't her throat being cut.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 23, 2009

    Animals in Translation needs translation

    I couldn't get past the cattle industry in this book. In fact, I found it so dull, I didn't finish it. Why put a picture of a beautiful weimeriner on the cover and talk about the best way to kill cattle for me to eat?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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