Customer Reviews for

Antiphon (Psalms of Isaak Series #3)

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  • Posted September 3, 2010

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    An intricately detailed fantasy you could get lost in with all the tangled webs of manipulation. Wonderful!

    Ken has to have a metal mans memory for the wondrous things he does here. To remember all the little threads he starts, then we get to the new things created here. This book takes Fantasy to a whole new level with the old fantasy feel and mechanicals mixed in, then there are magicks in the mix and hints of gods and different worlds. This series is truly one of the most in depth mesmerizing epic fantasy reads I have been captivated by. The author is really talented.

    So much is happening and every word is important to the story. The words could have so many different meanings to them when you start putting them together.

    The story continues on in the lives of the characters as we go through the changes in the world. The chapters are broken in to separate Point of Views as in the previous two books, which helps greatly in getting all the information to you. And very well broken apart to understand each character.

    Rafe - The captain of the ship was porting Gypsies to the Sanctorum Lux until he is visited by the Moon Sparrow used by the Francines in the past, to stop by an island. And is hijacked by metal men.

    Rudolfo - Once certain of what his place was and what to do, now is unsure what he is to do with the world that is crumbling around him. He still works hard to help the refugees showing up at his lands and save the light, but at what cost to the Ninefold Forest. How much help can Rudolfo spare in this drastically changing world.

    Jin Li Tam - is still having the dark horrible dreams, but not as often now with Jakob better. She finds a small silver mecroservitor sparrow trapped while she is walking in the woods. The mechanical sparrow is looking for Isaak.

    Petronus - now living with the scars on his neck and over his heart is having dreams wanting to be heard and understood, but he just can't grasp them. Instead he wakes in cold sweats.

    Winters - now living in a city for refugees by the library the mechoservitors are creating. She does paperwork but it seems as she has lost her faith, the old faith of her people. Waiting in this new life she is making, in the Ninefold forest, for Neb to return to her.

    Vlad Li Tam - He and his few sons and daughters who where fortunate enough to be rescued have returned to they dreaded island, for six months now, to seek what they can of the Machtvolk who tortured them and have lived here. Vlad Li Tam still watches for the light he had seen in the water that day six months ago.

    Neb - He is deep in the Churning Wastes with Renard, his guide. He has learned to survive and thrive here. But now he sees new visitors, to fast to be scouts of the Gypsies or even users of the black roots. But he still tries to decipher the response needed to the canticle of the silver crescent. Neb and Renard separate to carry out different deeds with the new visitors only to find trouble lays in front of him.

    All these characters are shaken up and a little lost with how to respond to the whole situation and happenings of the last six months. And things are not getting better.

    I did find myself getting lost in some of the story depth. It is amazing the depth of the manipulation of the characters. To try and piece it all together at times is hard to do, but I love trying to get there before Mr. Scholes.

    There is a mixture of wizards and magics with science and technology in these books. Even the hints of Gods and different worlds. I would suggest this captivating series to an

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 23, 2010

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    Antiphon is the 3rd of 5 in the Psalms of Isaak series.

    Welcome to the wonderful world of Mr. Schole's brilliant imagination where in a world far- far away where the mode of transportation is still horseback he gives us unimaginable wonders like thinking talking metal men one of which is called Isaak and these are his Psalms.
    In this volume "war is coming" as we were warned in the previous novel, but there's more going on than meets the glowing eyes of the Mechoservitors . There's unrest in the Ninefold Forest as well as all the other nations in the Named Lands. The problem is who is driving it? Is it Ria, the new queen of the Machtvolk who disposed her little sister? Is it the strange metal man known as the watcher? Or is it something more dire and more sinister. Well my friends you'll have to read it for yourself to find out if the Andofrancine Order will survive, if the Younger Gods or the Wizard Kings have any part in this and what does the house Li Tam have to do with it all.
    Ken Scholes is a master storyteller who's imaginative mind brings us this make-believe world with some of the most unforgettable characters ever to grace a page of a book. His Named Lands and Nine Fold Forest come alive with his descriptive dialogue along with those characters mentioned before. Underlying plots are all going on at once and Mr. Scholes brings them all together brilliantly as he weaves his own "Whymer Maze" for his audience's entertainment. He has many protagonists in his series so it's hard to bring one to the forefront without ignoring someone else, so I'll just say that they're all amazing in their development and their portrayal. They are all an important instrument in bringing his story to life, and life is what this tale is all about, life and the pursuit of "the light". And hidden beneath all the strife and hardships are classic love stories, stories about alliances that turn to love about two opposites who attract about love of family and love of friends, about sacrifices made for the love of a child, and about the love of one's people and the need to go forward into the unknown for a better way of life. You readers will not want to stop turning pages in this epic adventure series any more than you'd want to stop breathing.
    This series will appeal to a multitude of audiences, don't be afraid to give it a try just because it bears the label Science Fiction. Inside lovers of mysteries will find a great one, thriller lovers will find none more chilling, lovers of adventure will find it hard to catch their breath, lovers of romance will get their love story and lovers of make believe will get it all. So bring out your inner child and use your imagination and enter the magnificent mind of Mr. Ken Scholes. This novel is a great story on it's own, but if you neglect the first two you will loose valuable information given there.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2012

    Highly recommend

    I enjoyed reading Ken Scholes first two novels in this series, Lamentation and Canticle, that I actually felt compelled to order the third book, Antiphon. You know those kind of books you read and you get to the last page and you're like "Oh no, there must be more!" That's how I felt when I read Lamentation and Canticle. Lots of complicated characters but not so complicated you lose track of them. I haven't finished reading Antiphon yet but I certainly don't regret ordering it. Great reads.

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  • Posted October 30, 2010

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    A Wonderful Epic

    This third addition to the Psalms of Isaak series is enjoyable and immersive. It can be read as a stand-alone or as the third installment in one of the best epic fantasies I have ever had the pleasure to read. Although enjoyment will be enhanced by reading the first two books, this story stands on its own as a completely entertaining tale. This book concerns the mysterious recurrence and build-up of a fanatical cult that practices sadistic blood magic as well as the re-invention and return of an earlier species, designated the 'younger gods', into a pre-industrial world that nonetheless retains wondrous mechanicals from an earlier age. One of these mechanicals is Isaak, a metal man who sang out a death curse that destroyed a city and gained self-awareness in the process.

    Like all the books in this series, the story lines follow the experiences of certain key figures who are masterfully humanized. Their stories are intriguing, and the tale unwinds at a pace that ranges from fast to faster. The book's climax is explosive, and the finish leaves the reader hungering for more. This book and the entire series blends fantasy with science fiction and presents the entire package as an irresistible story. If you're interested in an epic tale with intriguing characters, mystery, magic and mechanical wonders, then I recommend that you read this book and series.

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  • Posted October 11, 2010

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    A Must Read

    Book 3 in this Epic Series by Ken Scholes. The first two installments in this series set the stage for this page turner. Ken is proving to be the ultimate spinner of great tales as he leaves the reader guessing what the next chapter will reveal with the turn of the page.

    The entire PSALMS OF IZAAK is AN ABSOLUTE MUST RE-READ.

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  • Posted September 7, 2010

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    This series just keeps getting better

    Antiphon is book three of The Psalms of Isaac, a five book epic fantasy series. Wait, don't leave if you haven't read the first two books. It's not entirely necessary to have read them to enjoy this volume, although I recommend doing so. The author takes care to refresh our memories of events that happened in the first two books and provide explanations for those who pick up the series with Antiphon, but the level of understanding and satisfaction will be enhanced with the detail in the first two volumes. ~~~~~ I read books one and two, Lamentation and Canticle, shortly before I read Antiphon. I only recently became acquainted with this series by having the opportunity to review an ARC of Antiphon and so decided to read them all at once. I was not disappointed. Each book gets better. Ken Scholes has created an original world, an ambitious plot and a richly layered epic tale. ~~~~~ The series begins with the destruction of the city of Windwir, the murder of it's people and the hint of a coming war between the Kingdoms of the Named Lands. At times I felt it was a bit slow while I got to know the characters and their world but that was to be expected with a story this vast and by the end of Lamentation I was hooked on the series. ~~~~~ Antiphon is an even better book than the first two, which I enjoyed. Now that the characters are developed we proceed at a faster pace. More of the plot is revealed, many of the story lines that built up in the first two novels come together, and questions are answered. There are some great plot twists, surprises, and new mysteries arise. Nothing is as it seems. The second half of Antiphon flew by and concluded with a climactic ending, an element which I did not feel was present in the first two books. ~~~~~ The writing style is from the point of view of each of the main characters within each chapter. I liked this and felt it allowed the reader to get to know each character. We were able to experience their thoughts and feelings as the point of view would shift. The story flowed nicely and was easy to follow. ~~~~~ This is not your typical wizards and swords story although many elements are present such as dreams to foretell events and the use of magic potions and powders. There is a lot of political maneuvering and alliances among the leaders of the Named Lands and the different religious beliefs in each of the lands contribute to the conflicts. The setting is medieval where characters ride horseback, use knives as weapons and send messages by bird, but there are also mechanical men, powered by steam, who hold a library of knowledge from a bygone era. There is good and evil, love and betrayal and at times the story becomes dark and painful with war, assassinations, and torture. There is a science fiction element present which becomes more evident as the series progresses. ~~~~~ I recommend Antiphon and the entire Psalms of Isaak series, especially to fans of the fantasy and science fiction genre.

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  • Posted September 5, 2010

    The Best Series

    Scholes has not slowed down the pace, this book just takes off and keeps moving. It is good to see that the third out of five books did not take a minute to relax. The characters never stop developing, growing and surprising us. New pieces to this world Ken created are coming forth. At this point I don't know how he can stop at 5 books. I am anxiously awaiting Requiem.

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  • Posted September 1, 2010

    One of the best!

    This is my first time reading this genre and I have clearly started out with the best. Antiphon is beautifully written with great character development and an exciting plot line with an ending that you just won't believe! Ken Scholes is a master storyteller and I can't wait for his next release.

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  • Posted August 27, 2010

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    Can't get enough of the Named Lands!

    I received this novel courtesy of Tor publishing and Barnes and Noble Booksellers as a pre-released book for review and discussion. When I was aware that I would be receiving this ARC, I quickly snagged up books 1 and 2 (Lamentation and Canticle) and entered a world of sci-fi/fantasy blend. I was not disappointed.
    Scholes is adept at weaving intricacies that I can only begin to understand how he organizes. The lives of the characters (each book highlights various points of view) twine together so masterfully that part of the joy of reading this saga is trying to predict and hypothesize the future; which is difficult at best. Scholes has a knack for blowing your predictions out of the water.
    In Antiphon, everything explodes as we discover many things that we thought were no longer, are in fact very present. Ken Scholes creates a world of mystery and intrigue with various religious factions, magic, mechanical men with emotions and agendas, gods and ghosts.

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  • Posted August 22, 2010

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    "Antiphon"

    What do mechoservitors, kin-wolves, kin ravens, Behemoth, the Marsh King, and gypsies have to do with each other? All are part of this third installment of "The Psalms of Isaak." Runners deliver messages and search the land with the use of magic and black root; Nebios is hunted and called "Abomination;" Jin Li Tam makes an unexpected journey with Jakob; and Winter and Ria discover the tenuous tie that binds them. All the while, mechoservitors hurry to meet together to save the Antiphon. Come read of the continuing journey "home" and of those who wish to thwart that journey. The twists and turns will keep you guessing all the way to the end. Here's hoping that the fourth installment will be out next year!

    I was privileged to read "Antiphon" as part of Sneak Peek at Barnes & Noble. While I haven't read the first two installments, I was able to pick up on the plot. This is a book that is difficult to put down, and I recommend it to anyone who loves sci-fi/fantasy. I will be reading the first two books, then re-reading this one, to prepare for "Requiem" (hoping for it to come out in 2011).

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  • Posted August 16, 2010

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    Third book in the series is a winner

    Following on the heals of his first two books and a short story, Ken Scholes comes through with more adventure, and revelations in this third book in the Psalm of Isaak.
    The characters are rich and full-bodied, bringing the reader into each one's life and journey as they attempt to discover their role in the plot that has begun to unfurl in regards to the saving of the Light.

    In the first two books the reader was introduced to the destruction of Windwir and all of the inhabitants, as well as the beginning of the upheaval of life of all in The Named Lands. It also showed the beginnings of the destruction of a religion based on the teachings of a scholar who revered the Light. Questions were raised as to each of the main character's role in that destruction of that city, and the role for the future of the Light. In addition, the rise of the Matchvolk and their religion based on the foretelling of the Crimson Princess there is the horror of killings and ritual knife cuttings those who they believe need redemption.

    The mystery of the mechanical men for either the rise of the new religion, or the salvation of the old is a main focus of this volume, and raises question after question for the reader...but, contributes to the excitement of the novel.

    Where Canticle ended on a very solemn note, this book begins darkly and starts to turn the tide towards hope and revelation. The twist and turns of the plot, and the development of the characters is more pronounced in this edition, making it by far the best of the three books.

    Although this book could stand alone, it is best read following not only the two books before, but also the short story called "A Weeping Czar Beholds the Fallen Moon."

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  • Posted August 17, 2010

    Raising the Stakes

    This book continues the Psalms of Isaak series--and it really increases the stakes. As Jin Li Tam, Rudolpho, Petronus, Nebios, Winters, Vlad Li Tam, and Isaak all seek to serve the Light, alliances shift and the path to serve the light becomes less and less clear. This book has lots of surprises--and really, no one seems truly safe. Scholes investigates what family means and what we owe our family--and what separates man from machine in this beautiful and intriguing book. I can't wait till the last two in the series come out!

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  • Posted August 15, 2010

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    a terrific thriller that showcases Ken Scholes's talent

    When the arrogant Androfrancine Order monks ruled the Named Lands with an iron fist, they ignored the people's well-being to focus on the technolgy and magic of the ancient Wizard Kings. Thus their neglect and fall leaves chaos throughoutout The Named Lands as groups that once believed in te now dead Y'Zirite religion rises with its bloody violence.

    When Nebious was a child, he witnessed the horror that haunts him as an desert chieftain; he watched the genocde of Windwir. He misses his Marsh Queen spouse while suffering from feral nightmares and is aware that women warriors seek to kill him. His mother the Ninefold Forest Queen Jin Li Tam tries to keep him safe, but so many want him dead. Nebious learns from his mother that her religious advisors believe that Jakop, the baby son of the Gypsy King Rudolfo, is the "Child of Promise"; if affirmed the infant has followers who want him as the high king and adversaries who want him dead. At the same time hidden in the shadows is the most dangerous threat to the Named Lands while eerily music spreads from the wastes across the lands leaving the Androfrancine monks and Rudolfo wondering what this denotes.

    The third volume of the Psalms of Isaak (see Lamentation and Canticle) continues the excellent moxing of science fiction and epic fantasy with a powerful mystery adding excitement (a venn diagram in which the three genres' respective circles mostly overlap). The fast-paced story line contains a myriad of subplots yet also is filled with action that cohesively moves forward the overarching theme. With all the adventures that takes place, fully developed players representing different aspects of the Named Lands' various societies, especially the key leads, make for a terrific thriller that showcases Ken Sholes's talent. This series is a winner.

    Harriet Klausner

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    Posted July 25, 2011

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