Customer Reviews for

Aquifer: Truth Lies Just Below the Surface

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Aquifer: Truth Lies Just Below The Surface by Jonathan Friesen i

Aquifer: Truth Lies Just Below The Surface by Jonathan Friesen is an unique tale with deception, love, freedom, and faith combined into one package. While I did enjoy this book, it was missing the emotional attachment that is necessary for any truly gripping book. I fou...
Aquifer: Truth Lies Just Below The Surface by Jonathan Friesen is an unique tale with deception, love, freedom, and faith combined into one package. While I did enjoy this book, it was missing the emotional attachment that is necessary for any truly gripping book. I found myself scanning the pages wondering when it would be over. But over all it was a fairly well written book, with little to no grammatical or spelling errors. Aquifer followed the basic plot of literature and had no monumental plot twist, leaving me hungry for more of an edge of your seat read. I did enjoy the characters and their personalities though. I would recommend this book for someone looking for a quick read or a unique story to do a book report on.

posted by TheAvidWriter on July 25, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

I would say that this was an okay book.  This was not a book tha

I would say that this was an okay book.  This was not a book that if I needed to, I could put it down and not sit wondering what would happen next.  At times, yes it did have a quick story line, but overall it seemed to move slowly.

What had originally interested me wa...
I would say that this was an okay book.  This was not a book that if I needed to, I could put it down and not sit wondering what would happen next.  At times, yes it did have a quick story line, but overall it seemed to move slowly.

What had originally interested me was the fact that this was a "futuristic" book.  It takes place about 240 years from now, and the world has only one source water, the Aquifer.  And the only way to get the water is to exchange light for the water.   It seems like it could be potentially good, but to me the story didn't move fast enough and did not have me invested in the characters enough.  Normally, if I really like a book, I can sit down and read it in a day or two.  This book, took me over a week to read, and it's not even that big.    

posted by Anonymous on August 3, 2013

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  • Posted November 5, 2013

    It¿s about likeability and I¿m not sure this book had it.  AQUIF

    It’s about likeability and I’m not sure this book had it.  AQUIFER’s characters, setting, and plot were both gritty and ugly.  The way the story is told, however, causes the reader to believe the story is much more shallow and unfinished than it actually is.
    I worry that for some readers, the filled plot holes at the end of the book might be too late to salvage the story.  Without giving away too much of the twist, I can say that the world building is intentionally designed to feel fake.  There’s a layer of world building beneath the one the reader is introduced to in the beginning chapters, yet I don’t know if all the aspects of that world are explained thoroughly enough.
    My perception of the book was that it has a handle of scenes with striking similarities to THE GIVER (such as the boy learning a dangerous secret when he inherits his new position in society), yet as a whole it delivers quite a different message.  I can’t say that I enjoyed how the story evolved, though it was thoroughly unpredictable from start to finish.  Some of the minor characters felt like plot devices rather than people and it’s a shame than their lack of depth restricted how much the main characters could develop.
    I’m sure that this will be a book enjoyed by some and not liked by others.  Without giving away the ending, I can’t pinpoint exactly what type of people will love this book.  What I can say is that AQUIFER most certainly ventures outside of what is expected of the YA dystopian genre.

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  • Posted October 9, 2013

    (Source: I received a digital copy of this book for free on a re

    (Source: I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-review basis. Thanks to Zonderkidz-Books and Netgalley.)
    15-year-old Luca lives in a world where water is scarce. His father is the water deliverer, who must go below ground to obtain fresh water for the people of the town in which he lives.


    I can’t give much more of a summary for this book, because I found it really hard to work out what the hell was going on.
    We started off with some woman being found in shackles and drowned, then moved on to Luca. We were told a little about how there was a lack of water, and that previously some people had discovered water below the earth, and those people now lived and bred down there, and were now called rats. Once a year the deliverer went down there, and exchanged ‘rods of light’ for another year of clean fresh water.
    Luca’s father was not all there though, he has previously had his memories wiped, and seemed a bit nuts. When he then went off to do the exchange, the people who governed them – the ‘Amongus’ tell Luca that his father has been retired, but Luca then finds out that he has actually been ‘undone’ (this involves shackles being attached to the arms and legs, and then the person jumps into the sea and drowns – no I don’t know why they do this, but it is apparently a more peaceful way to kill someone). This means that Luca is now the new deliverer.

    Anyway, there were just so many things going on that weren’t explained in this book that it made it super confusing. The people talked about their ‘dials’, and said that their dials ‘wiggled’. As far as I could make out, these dials must have been implanted or something, and these dials allowed the Amongus to tell when they were lying or experiencing strong emotion? Not very clear and not well explained at all.

    When we did then get some information about how this world came to be, we got an info dump, and there still wasn’t enough information to really know what was going on. We got a story about the world flooding and everyone except for one family being killed, which sounds to me an awful lot like the story of Noah and the Ark from the Christian faith. Not sure if this was intentional, or whether this book was supposed to have some sort of religious connotations or what, but that’s what it seemed like to me.

    These were just a couple of the things that bothered me about this book, but there were more, and this book just became unreadable for me. After struggling with it, I eventually gave up having gotten so frustrated and confused that I couldn’t take it anymore.
    I think this could be a good story, if there was more world building and better explanation of things, but as it is I really couldn’t enjoy it.
    Overall; confusing and poor world building.
    4 out of 10.

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