Customer Reviews for

Aquifer: Truth Lies Just Below the Surface

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Aquifer: Truth Lies Just Below The Surface by Jonathan Friesen i

Aquifer: Truth Lies Just Below The Surface by Jonathan Friesen is an unique tale with deception, love, freedom, and faith combined into one package. While I did enjoy this book, it was missing the emotional attachment that is necessary for any truly gripping book. I fou...
Aquifer: Truth Lies Just Below The Surface by Jonathan Friesen is an unique tale with deception, love, freedom, and faith combined into one package. While I did enjoy this book, it was missing the emotional attachment that is necessary for any truly gripping book. I found myself scanning the pages wondering when it would be over. But over all it was a fairly well written book, with little to no grammatical or spelling errors. Aquifer followed the basic plot of literature and had no monumental plot twist, leaving me hungry for more of an edge of your seat read. I did enjoy the characters and their personalities though. I would recommend this book for someone looking for a quick read or a unique story to do a book report on.

posted by TheAvidWriter on July 25, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

I would say that this was an okay book.  This was not a book tha

I would say that this was an okay book.  This was not a book that if I needed to, I could put it down and not sit wondering what would happen next.  At times, yes it did have a quick story line, but overall it seemed to move slowly.

What had originally interested me wa...
I would say that this was an okay book.  This was not a book that if I needed to, I could put it down and not sit wondering what would happen next.  At times, yes it did have a quick story line, but overall it seemed to move slowly.

What had originally interested me was the fact that this was a "futuristic" book.  It takes place about 240 years from now, and the world has only one source water, the Aquifer.  And the only way to get the water is to exchange light for the water.   It seems like it could be potentially good, but to me the story didn't move fast enough and did not have me invested in the characters enough.  Normally, if I really like a book, I can sit down and read it in a day or two.  This book, took me over a week to read, and it's not even that big.    

posted by Anonymous on August 3, 2013

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  • Posted September 14, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Although there were some plot points that I feel could have been

    Although there were some plot points that I feel could have been fleshed out a bit more, this was an enjoyable, thought-provoking storyline with an element of spirituality that was not expected. Luca was a character that the YA reader will identify with and ultimately care for by the end of the book. I thoroughly enjoyed how the author described this dystopian future of a world without freshwater on Earth’s surface and a tenable hold on a limited supply underground. It takes place on and around the coast of Australia. It wasn’t fully explained how the world came to be in such a state, but that was likely due to the lack of knowledge of Luca, who tells the story in first person narrative. In this world, the written word had all but been destroyed, as it is seen as a method that could incite rebellion. This was understandable, once the reader learned the extent of Luca’s and his fellow New Pertian’s figurative and sometimes literal imprisonment.

    The religious undertones are subtle throughout, and although God, the Bible, and Jesus Christ are never mentioned, they are hinted at often. That was a pleasant surprise for me, since it isn’t billed as Christian literature, and that may be in order to market to a larger YA population. However, some of the hints are so subtle, some YA readers may not make the connection if they’ve never been exposed to church or the story of Christ. The only religious connection actually named is the song Talya sings near the end. The story ends with some questions and many other reviewers have assumed it means there is a sequel. I didn’t immediately jump to that conclusion, and I’m not sure if one is planned or not. I felt as though the questions are more for the reader to ask him or herself, and complete the story in their own mind. Overall, an enjoyable read, and I would continue the story if sequels are written at some point.

    Rating: 4

    HEAT Rating: None

    Reviewed By: Daysie W.

    Review Courtesy of: My Book Addiction and More

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 14, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Don't miss out on this unique, fascinating story set in the year

    Don't miss out on this unique, fascinating story set in the year 2250, where drinkable water is hard to find and feelings and art are forbidden! The Council monitors emotion and lethally enforces their rule. Once a year the Deliverer travels down a long and winding path into the heart of the earth to exchange light rods for water with the rats, once human creatures who guard an aquifer, the only fresh water available on earth. Sixteen-year-old Luca, as his son, knows that one day he will take his father's place, but didn't believe it would be so soon. His father doesn't return from his journey and Luca starts to question what he believes to be true. Along with an unlikely group of friends, he retreats underground to make the journey himself to find out what has happened. What he discovers will change everything as he tries to save both worlds.

    I haven't read much dystopian fiction yet, except mainly the Hunger Games, which I loved, and I find this genre fascinating. I really enjoyed this story and thought the author did a good job of making me sympathize with Luca and really, all of humanity for the type of world they live in. There was a lot of action as someone always seemed to be after Luca and his group and some sadness, but there are also happy moments and ultimately, the story is filled with hope. There's a bit of a spiritual side to the story, which I enjoyed and would have liked to see more of. This is geared toward young adults, but I think any adult would enjoy this if they like unique stories, especially along the lines of the Hunger Games.

    I received a free ARC copy from Zondervan in exchange for an honest review.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2013

    Exceptional. A book that made me think! Finally.

    Exceptional. A book that made me think! Finally.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2013

    Imagine living in a world without fresh water when you turn on t

    Imagine living in a world without fresh water when you turn on the tap. Imagine living a life of total control, where fear, anger, and love are prohibited; a land where children are “taken, developed, and returned;” a land where books are banned. This is sixteen-year-old Luca’s world in 2250.
    Author Jonathan Friesen’s YA novel, AQUIFER, explores a world where people are not always who they seem and one misspoken word or action can prove fatal. To have water, the Deliverer goes to the underground Aquifer once a year and trades rods of light with the feared Water Rat people that control the Aquifer. Luca’s father is the Deliverer, and when he does not return from his journey seeking water, Luca must take his place. Not only does Luca worry about his father, he has just turned sixteen and knows nothing about how to even reach the Aquifer, yet he must complete the task of going underground and bringing water to his world or everyone will die.
    AQUIFER is a story of lies, family secrets, and betrayal. It’s also a story of friendship and learning to trust. Are the Rat people friends or enemies? Are they so different to the people that live aboveground? When Luca meets Talya, a Rat girl, she stirs feelings inside him he’s never before felt. He begins to question what he’s been told his whole life. Is one world better than the other? Both worlds have their problems. Luca soon must make a choice. What he decides could destroy everything and everyone he loves and believes in.
    The author’s vivid imagery places the reader in the story with Luca and his friends. The darkness of the caves closes around you, and the water threatens to suck you under. You hear the screams of the people, struggling simply to survive. The tenderness of Luca and Talya as they discover first love makes you want life to turn out good for them. But the odds for their happiness are slim. AQUIFER would make a great addition to high school libraries and classrooms for a discussion on our natural resources and what might happen to them someday, if we don‘t conserve them. You’ll also want a copy for your own library, to remember how precious, not only our water is, but truth and friendship, as well. I’m looking forward to continuing Luca’s journey to see what happens to his world.
    ###

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2013

    Aquifer: Truth Lies Just Below The Surface by Jonathan Friesen i

    Aquifer: Truth Lies Just Below The Surface by Jonathan Friesen is an unique tale with deception, love, freedom, and faith combined into one package. While I did enjoy this book, it was missing the emotional attachment that is necessary for any truly gripping book. I found myself scanning the pages wondering when it would be over. But over all it was a fairly well written book, with little to no grammatical or spelling errors. Aquifer followed the basic plot of literature and had no monumental plot twist, leaving me hungry for more of an edge of your seat read. I did enjoy the characters and their personalities though. I would recommend this book for someone looking for a quick read or a unique story to do a book report on.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 28, 2014

    I enjoy apocalyptic style fiction, and because of the storyline

    I enjoy apocalyptic style fiction, and because of the storyline (lack of water in the future), this one caught my attention. This is a young adult book, but adults can enjoy it too. Whether you also find the storyline interesting, or you're just looking for a good book for your teen to read, this one is a great choice. Set in the area where Australia would be today, I enjoyed it a lot.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2014

    Aquifer by Janathan Friesen was a pleasant change from the usual

    Aquifer by Janathan Friesen was a pleasant change from the usual distopian novels. This author has great imagination and isn't afraid to write something a little different from the current "top rated books".
    The life of a deliverer is not all it appears. Generations of one family that goes below once a year to form an agreement to supply water to the "toppers". Above everyone is told lies to keep emotions in check and daily lifestyle uniform. Until one day everything changes and all that has been becomes the biggest wrinkle commited.
    I thought this was a wonderful story, sometimes confusing but easy to follow for a more advanced reader. Reading this made me want to watch Waterworld, oh how I love that movie! This book is labeled teen fiction but I would put this at more of a college light read. It wasn't inappropriate at all but just has a lot going on. If you are unfamiliar with water systems or government this book would appear more fantasy when realisticly we aren't so far off.
    All in all, this was enjoyable. I wonderful winter read as it wasn't particularly depressing nor was it making you miss the beach!
    This book was provided free of charge by booksneeze in exchange for an honest review, everything I have written are my own words and my honest thoughts.

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