Customer Reviews for

Armageddon: The Battle for Germany, 1944-1945

Average Rating 4.5
( 16 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 18 of 16 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2014

    Well done

    A book that provides new insight where before there just was old information.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 28, 2014

    Highly Recommended

    I was there part of the time before coming home. This book real tells it like it was.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 13, 2010

    Classic Hastings: shrewd, authoritative, balanced

    Most books concerning this period of WWII choose a single theme or perspective and go from there. Max Hastings tackles many themes and perspectives, and does it very well. Hastings' battle narratives are coupled with his shrewd analysis of the impact the commanders, soldiers and equipment had on the outcome. Others often stop here, but Hastings goes further to incorporate an analysis of how the philosophical background of the societies from which the combatants came, coupled with their leaders' political objectives, impacted the outcome. You will not finish this book without having a number of "ah, now I get it" moments.

    Perhaps Hastings' greatest achievement in this book is his description of the fragile alliance between Britain, the US and the USSR that somehow managed to stick together long enough to pull it all off. Sixty five years after the fact, we often forget that by 1945, the US/British relationship was quite strained, and neither had much in common with the Soviets other than the defeat of Germany. Hastings correctly points out Eisenhower's essential role in managing a marriage of convenience. While I wish a few sentences could also have been given to the role General Marshall played to organize the manpower and industrial strength of the American contribution to the war effort, it's a small complaint against the overall narrative.

    This is a surprisingly fast read, considering the subject matter and the scope of what Hastings covers. Hastings is no less of an editor when it comes to his own work than what he exercised over others' work at the Daily Telegraph, and everyone benefits from it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2013

    This was verygood story..For me it was interesting..

    This was verygood story..For me it was interesting..

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 1, 2013

    rehash bombast

    rehash bombast

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2011

    Top Notch History!

    Tells a powerful, convincing story about the dramatic months of the latter campaigns of World War II. Packed with insight and yet easy to read. This is momentous history. Highly recommended.

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  • Posted September 23, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Fine study of the last years of World War Two on the Western front

    For this outstanding book, military historian Max Hastings researched in the archives of four countries and conducted 170 interviews with survivors of the war. Brilliantly written, it conveys the horror of war, without idealisation. Throughout, he makes realistic judgements.

    For example, he writes of the Warsaw uprising, "the Polish commander wanted it both ways: the success of his revolt hinged upon recognising Russian military support, while its explicit objective was to deny the Soviet Union political authority over his country."

    Hastings asserts, "the British Joint Intelligence Committee had concluded that, if the Poles carried out their long-planned uprising, it was doomed to failure in the absence of close co-operation with the Russians, which was unlikely to be forthcoming. It seems lamentable that, after making such an appreciation, the British failed to exert all possible pressure upon the Poles to abandon their fantasies."

    He points out, "Despite some historian's idealisation of those who were ruthlessly returned to Stalin, the murderous record of Cossacks who served the Wehrmacht in northern Italy and Yugoslavia deserves more attention than it has received."

    He observes, "Stalin's people were overwhelmingly responsible for destroying Hitler's armies." He cites American historian Forrest Pogue who wrote that the Soviet forces "broke Germany and made the [D-Day] landing possible." Hastings judges, 'the single most impressive ground operation of the war' was Operation Bagration of July-August 1944, and Stalin was 'the most successful warlord of the Second World War'.

    The key dilemma at the end of the war in Europe was whether the Anglo-American forces should try to take Berlin, which was a hundred miles inside the agreed Soviet occupation zone. Hastings applauds Eisenhower's decision not to try, and shows that no Anglo-American action in spring 1945 could, or should, have undone the agreements reached at the Teheran and Yalta conferences.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2009

    War from all sides

    Max Hastings gives a very thorough account of the final days of the Third Reich. We see the experience of the Western Allies, the Soviets and the Germans, the grand strategy of generals and battle accounts are given perspective by the experiences of ordinary soldiers and civilians from all sides.

    This book does not gloss over the terrible cost of the war, and it is quite honest about how much higher a price the Soviets paid than the Western Allies. The war on the Eastern front was far more savage, mostly because both sides were far more willing to sacrifice vast numbers of men for their military objectives. Hastings shows how such a sacrifice would have been impossible for democracies like Britain and the USA, but that their more cautious tactics were only made possible by the enormous sacrifice of the Soviets. Simply put, the greatest credit for the defeat of the Nazi's goes to the Soviet Communists.

    Nevertheless, this book is not an apportioning of credit or blame, but a gripping account of the battles that ended Nazi Germany. It is a vivid portrait with much human interest on every page and I highly reccommend it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2009

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    Posted October 18, 2008

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    Posted October 18, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2010

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    Posted January 18, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2010

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