Customer Reviews for

Arrow of God

Average Rating 5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted June 8, 2011

    A Bolt of Tragedy! Chinua Achebe's Arrow of God Beautifully Concludes His Trilogy of African Tragedies.

    The acclaimed sequel to Things Fall Apart and No Longer At Ease, Chinua Achebe's Arrow of God does not disappoint, and is one of the most literarily evident works I have come across. Interestingly, Achebe decides against focusing the novel on Umoufia and the family of Okonkwo, but sets the story in a new Igbo nation, Umuaro, in the mid-1920's. The story follows Ezeulu, the Chief Priest of the nation's main deity, Ulu, who 5 years after a war with a neighboring village is still seeking a return to normalcy. Ezeulu faces the challenges of raising his family, living by his principles, and holding Umuaro under the guidance of Ulu, the deity that has protected for as long as anyone can remember while facing opposition from a rival priest Ezidemeli, and the gathering strength of the Christian Church in Nigeria.

    Direct, seemingly simple, yet deep text makes Arrow of God shine. Using subtle symbols, Achebe provides insight into the pride that drives Ezeulu, and gives insight into what drives the priest's actions. Like Things Fall Apart and No Longer at Ease before it, Arrow of God's subvert symbolism helps Achebe's ideas and views to sneak into a reader's mind behind the guise of direct language. Little room is left for readers to misinterpret the author's intentions; his strong words leave no space to wiggle. Just as he did in his previous novels, Achebe tricks you into loving a not-so-perfect protagonist through his efficient use of language.

    All in all, this is a great read if you enjoy Achebe's other works, and a good one to start with if you haven't read any of his books before now. I highly recommend this book to anyone who is looking for a subtle tragedy, for someone who wants to read a story of pride, or for someone who wants to read about a society changing as one of its greatest pillars tries to return to life as it was. This book shows that the greatest tragedy is more than losing one's life or one's principles, but losing the culture and community that one values, helpless to slow the bleeding.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2006

    Magical

    Arrow of God kept me up all night. Chinua Achebe is a master storyteller.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2005

    Absolutely wonderful

    ARROW OF GOD is just as good as THINGS FALL APART, if not better. The story is based on the exotic traditional village culture of the Igbo nation in Western Nigeria. It is one of the African best literary works I have read. Achebe took us into Ezeulu's changing world and did what few writers can do- make us understand it all.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2004

    Kudos to a great Writer!

    This is Achebe's best (if you ask me). Reading this book, I came to know a lot about the Ibo tradition.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2003

    Exploring a new world

    I must say that I first I found reading this book somewhat confusing and perpetual, but I have nothing but my own ignorence of the African culture to blame for that. As I studied up on African tradions and way of life I found this book quite meaningful

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1