Customer Reviews for

As I Lay Dying: The Corrected Text (Modern Library Series)

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted January 2, 2010

    A rewarding but challenging 'Read'

    A sobering visit to the very dysfunctional Bundren family. I purchased and read this book for an American Literature college course. I appreciated the many layers of depth in the text when reading it with an analytical eye. The characters are well developed in writing, even if they are not well developed people. I've only read it once, but as I have heard, it gets more amazing with each reading. Although difficult to read, this story is definitely a thought provoker. It can stir up a lot of vibrant debate on the complexity and simplicity of human traits.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2006

    AILD

    'How often have I lain beneath rain on a strange roof, thinking of home.' says Darl Bundren in William Faulkner's poetic novel As I Lay Dying. The title of this novel comes from Homer's Odyssey. As I lay dying are words spoken by Agamemnon's shade in Hades as he recounts his homecoming murder by his wife.'As I lay dying the woman with the dog's eyes would not close my eyelids for me as I descended into Hades.' While touching on the Greek classics I will mention that this novel reminds of Sophocles' tragedy Antigone, the story of a sisters repeated attempts to bury her brother. Leaving ancient Greece we find ourselves in late 1920s Mississippi as the Bundren family prepare to take their wife and mother Addie ,who is about to die, to her home town of Jefferson for burial. When she dies, early in the novel, they take the coffin by wagon and must endure flooded rivers and fire among other obstacles to get her there nine days later. The burden that the Bundrens carry in the wagon is mostly themselves, each self an onerous cargo. The story is told through multiple first person viewpoints of the family members, neighbors, and the people they meet along the way. Working the graveyard shift in a power plant Faulkner wrote this lyrical masterwork in about eight weeks. I like where Cash alludes to the golden rule in his carpenter language 'Folks seem to get away from the olden right teaching that says to drive the nails down and trim the edges well always like it was for your own use and comfort you were making it'. Hunting horn in hand Faulkner sounds the note mort in this novel. The Bundrens form a kind of rolling wake around Addie's coffin as the wagon wheels whisper a dirge in the Mississippi mud and the sky above them wears black circles in mourning.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2003

    A challenging, but compelling book

    As I lay Dying Is kind of hard to read, but it has a very interesting story. William Faulner divided this book up into 59 sections. 15 different characters tell the story. Faulkner constantly switches the narrator and that makes it kind of difficult to understand this book. This story is about a family that lives in rural Mississippi in the 1920's. The mother dies and the rest of the family has to take her body and casket 40 miles away to be buried. The family drives a covered wagon pulled by a team of mules. The family faces many hardships and that is what makes this book so interesting. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to be challenged as a reader. Overall, this book is one of the best ones I have ever read. The only part a reader will have to overcome is Faulkner's organizational techniques.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1