Customer Reviews for

The Assassins Gallery

Average Rating 4.5
( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 12 of 11 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2006

    Robbins does it again

    Before reading The Assassins Gallery, by David L. Robbins, I was quite a bit down on reading anything new. It seems that finding a book with any level of depth or quality penmanship these days is a pursuit not too easily accomplished. David Robbins has managed, in one book, to restore my faith and ressurrect my hunt for books (not written a century before) worth my time and effort. I've drilled through all of his previous books, loved them all, but still (due to the previously mentioned angst) approached The Assassins Gallery with a measure of trepidity. Robbins excels in crafting fiction around fact, morphing verifiable history into a personal stroll through aspects of the past you may not, beforehand, have given a second look. In his previous novels, Robbins took us through various moments of World War II, specifically detailing the matters involved in the Eastern Front of Europe and the quest to capture Berlin. This time, we're off the warfront, back in the States and on the chase for an assassin believed to be targeting none other than Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It's a chase against time and Mikhal Lammeck, an expert on assassins, has been given the task of hunting an assassin that has never been seen, never been confirmed, and to all in the government does not exist. From a small beach in New England to the Little White House in Warm Springs, Georgia, Lammeck pursues the assassin the only way possible: He has to think, act, behave like and become an assassin himself. The action is swift, hitting you squarely in the first chapter and leaving you stuck to the pages throughout. When the action brings us to the story's climax, when you've finally taken that breath you've been holding since page one, Robbins lays out the biggest gamble of them all, found in the book's final pages. To simply say that Robbins is a skilled artisan is leaving much yet on the table. What makes The Assassins Gallery worth the read is his investment in character and research. History is a living, breathing, functioning character and is given as much respect and leeway as any character in the book. You invest yourself in them all, feel what they feel, but are left with more, historically speaking, than absorbing one of the best books of the year. You learn and grow with a history you never knew existed and that--if there were no other reason--is why you will run to tell everybody about The Assassin's Gallery. Was there truly a plot to kill FDR? Did he really die of an aneurism at Warm Springs as history tells us? Or did the assassin succeed and alter the course of a nation's war?

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2006

    An Historical Thriller with teeth!

    THE ASSASSINS GALLERY by David Robbins was a thoroughly enjoyable read. I loved the idea of learning while wondering what would happen next. The plotting and planning of the assassin, and the strategy and thought processes of the professor were spectacular. I felt that I was right there in the city of Washington DC also. The twists and turns were so real and the surprises were great. Even the chase scene was done well in print rather than needing the big screen. I live in the DC area so I can also say that the atmosphere of the place and feelings of the area were wonderfully portrayed. What I liked best is that Robbins did not need to stray to unknown and needlessly incorrect facts to keep the suspense first rate!!!! He also did not need to overplay the blood and gore to make his point of the horrors of the killings. AND, politics of today did not need to be the focus of this HISTORICAL thriller---he let those times speak for the interest that they were in and of themselves!! He has hooked me into reading more of his books.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2006

    fascinating historical thriller

    As the countdown ends 1944, Judith comes ashore from the freezing water off Newburyport, Massachusetts into a Nor¿easter. When a two-person civilian patrol stops her on the beach, Judith tries a bluff, but when that fails she kills them. Judith cannot find her murder weapon, a twelfth century knife belonging to enemies of the Templars during the Crusades. Still the enemy agent knows stealth remains her major weapon so no one must know who came ashore. The murders on the beach upset the Secret Service, who assume a plot against President Roosevelt by unknown assassins. Agent Nabbit obtains the help of his former history professor Mikhal Lammeck, who concludes by the murder weapon used that the killer is a professional who will slay anyone remotely in his or her way. He assumes like Dag that FDR is the target. So he waits patiently in DC for the assassin¿s arrival, not realizing a female is the cold blooded killer and that she is already on the staff of Roosevelt's mistress Lucy Mercer Rutherford, but beyond stopping the assassin Lammeck wonders who hired her. --- David L. Robbins provides a fascinating historical thriller that uses an electrifying plot to enable the audience to look deeply at 1945 DC. The story line is action-packed so that the thriller crowd will sit on edge throughout, but also includes interesting tidbits. For instance many people by his fourth term thought Roosevelt was a benevolent dictator whose popularity was waning as the war seemed endless, but feared switching administrations (when will we begin hearing the noise to change the twenty-second amendment?). Lammeck is a well-rounded hero struggling to stop an assassination and uncover a conspiracy, but also relaxes by exploring his favorite subject, what is history, which ultimately is the underlying theme of this delightful thriller. --- Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2006

    This Summer's Must-Read

    David Robbins just keeps getting better! Once again, he handles a historical novel with the precision of a surgeon and the artisty of a poet. He has created wonderful and totally believeable characters which he reveals an inch at a time and just enough to keep the reader wanting more. Action-packed and at the same time intelligent, this book will appeal to readers of all generes.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 2, 2011

    one of the best books i have read in a long time!

    excellent book. enjoyed every page!

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    Posted January 19, 2010

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 12 of 11 Customer Reviews
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