Customer Reviews for

The Atlantis Prophecy

Average Rating 3.5
( 25 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Head and Shoulders Above Raising Atlantis

Thomas Greanias follows up Raising Atlantis with a top-flight thriller in The Atlantis Prophecy. Conrad Yeats and Serena Serghetti return for an adventure in which the fate of the world hangs in the balance. The plot revolves around the search for George Washington's ce...
Thomas Greanias follows up Raising Atlantis with a top-flight thriller in The Atlantis Prophecy. Conrad Yeats and Serena Serghetti return for an adventure in which the fate of the world hangs in the balance. The plot revolves around the search for George Washington's celestial globes, and the conspiracy that the search uncovers.

The story begins with a prologue set during America's formative years. Greanias does a masterful job at painting a picture which entices the reader and sets the stage for the story without giving anything away. Too many adventure stories begin with a prologue "just because" and it is always nice to see one that actually contributes to the plot.

The story takes off from the outset, with mysterious markings on his father's gravestone at Arlington National Cemetery sparking the quest. With enemies at every turn, Yeats' adventure takes him to locales of national and historical significance, including the United States Capitol Building and the Library of Congress. As the mystery unfolds, the plot ties in to George Washington, the masons, the stars, and Atlantis. Yeats finds himself in a race to solve the mystery and foil a plot that will take place at the moment of a specific astronomical event.

There are some familiar plot devices- codes to be decrypted, and of course the Vatican connection that comes with the character of Serena Serghetti. Some will note similarities between The Atlantis Prophecy and the National Treasure movies, but this book is actually based on a short story Greanias wrote several years ago- prior to the release of said movies. Also, the similarities are superficial. The Atlantis Prophecy, though a fast, fun read, is a grittier, more complex tale.

Greanias does a masterful job of doling out bits of mystery and history without affecting plot pacing. There are no big info dumps, and the action takes precedence. There are some well-crafted twists and surprises, and a couple of well-developed secondary characters: something that was missing from Raising Atlantis. Yeats has grown tougher and more resourceful, albeit jaded from the various losses he has suffered in his life.

Areas of relative weakness are few. The relationship between Yeats and Serghetti is tough to hold on to. We know that they have feelings for one another, and that circumstances and past history color their present relationship. What we don't get is any depth of development. Why do they care so deeply for one another? What makes these two click as a pair? This aspect could stand a deeper exploration.

Overall, this book is a major leap forward for Greanias, and stands head-and-shoulders above Raising Atlantis. I definitely recommend it for fans action and conspiracy thrillers.

posted by Megalith on March 26, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Good Historical Facts but the Plot is Lacking

This is the continued story of Conrad Yeats. You start the book with his father being buried and strange symbols on his grave stone. This interested Conrad into following a hunt to stop an apocalyptic event. Together with nun Serena Serghetti they must avoid Alignment a...
This is the continued story of Conrad Yeats. You start the book with his father being buried and strange symbols on his grave stone. This interested Conrad into following a hunt to stop an apocalyptic event. Together with nun Serena Serghetti they must avoid Alignment agents that want to turn America into the new Atlantis. But not everyone is as good as they seem. And no matter where Conrad goes, he continually fights an uphill battle.

Although it does not say anywhere, this is the second in a series. I'm sure it would make more sense if you read the first book Raising Atlantis. There was a lot of though and history. That really made the book more interesting. The basic plot line was good, but the ending fell short. I can see how it is supposed to lead to a third book, but it was not pulling at me to even read the first book to catch up.

posted by JBronder on April 3, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2009

    Good Historical Facts but the Plot is Lacking

    This is the continued story of Conrad Yeats. You start the book with his father being buried and strange symbols on his grave stone. This interested Conrad into following a hunt to stop an apocalyptic event. Together with nun Serena Serghetti they must avoid Alignment agents that want to turn America into the new Atlantis. But not everyone is as good as they seem. And no matter where Conrad goes, he continually fights an uphill battle.

    Although it does not say anywhere, this is the second in a series. I'm sure it would make more sense if you read the first book Raising Atlantis. There was a lot of though and history. That really made the book more interesting. The basic plot line was good, but the ending fell short. I can see how it is supposed to lead to a third book, but it was not pulling at me to even read the first book to catch up.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Head and Shoulders Above Raising Atlantis

    Thomas Greanias follows up Raising Atlantis with a top-flight thriller in The Atlantis Prophecy. Conrad Yeats and Serena Serghetti return for an adventure in which the fate of the world hangs in the balance. The plot revolves around the search for George Washington's celestial globes, and the conspiracy that the search uncovers.

    The story begins with a prologue set during America's formative years. Greanias does a masterful job at painting a picture which entices the reader and sets the stage for the story without giving anything away. Too many adventure stories begin with a prologue "just because" and it is always nice to see one that actually contributes to the plot.

    The story takes off from the outset, with mysterious markings on his father's gravestone at Arlington National Cemetery sparking the quest. With enemies at every turn, Yeats' adventure takes him to locales of national and historical significance, including the United States Capitol Building and the Library of Congress. As the mystery unfolds, the plot ties in to George Washington, the masons, the stars, and Atlantis. Yeats finds himself in a race to solve the mystery and foil a plot that will take place at the moment of a specific astronomical event.

    There are some familiar plot devices- codes to be decrypted, and of course the Vatican connection that comes with the character of Serena Serghetti. Some will note similarities between The Atlantis Prophecy and the National Treasure movies, but this book is actually based on a short story Greanias wrote several years ago- prior to the release of said movies. Also, the similarities are superficial. The Atlantis Prophecy, though a fast, fun read, is a grittier, more complex tale.

    Greanias does a masterful job of doling out bits of mystery and history without affecting plot pacing. There are no big info dumps, and the action takes precedence. There are some well-crafted twists and surprises, and a couple of well-developed secondary characters: something that was missing from Raising Atlantis. Yeats has grown tougher and more resourceful, albeit jaded from the various losses he has suffered in his life.

    Areas of relative weakness are few. The relationship between Yeats and Serghetti is tough to hold on to. We know that they have feelings for one another, and that circumstances and past history color their present relationship. What we don't get is any depth of development. Why do they care so deeply for one another? What makes these two click as a pair? This aspect could stand a deeper exploration.

    Overall, this book is a major leap forward for Greanias, and stands head-and-shoulders above Raising Atlantis. I definitely recommend it for fans action and conspiracy thrillers.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 22, 2010

    Would love to see a movie based around the series.

    I've always had an interest in the theories about Atlantis, and Thomas Greanias provides us with an adventure/thriller as good as National Treasure or some of the Indiana Jones. I had a hard time putting the first 2 books down, and looking forward to book 3.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    UNoriginal

    Crotch/Groin have never been used so unoriginally and so many times in one book. This books was so boring, thank goodness I got it for free. The action was laughable, and hard to keep track of, anytime the main character was in trouble, he just punched/kicked/grabbed and twisted the 'bad guys' crotch. Also the author seemed to have really downplayed any scenes that could have been very thrilling, such as when a character loses his finger he gives it one sentence, something like, "And then he pulled his hand away from the belt and a finger went flying across the room"(paraphrase). I'm sorry, but there is so much more you can do with that scenario. The plot also seemed to borrow heavily from the National Tresure movies, which isn't a bad thing in itself, but it all just seemed like I had read it before--- overall a very forgetable book. Don't bother.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2008

    Awesome

    Great read from page one! Awesome plot and good ending.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2008

    A book that you cannot put down!!

    For someone whose attention is hard to keep...this book definitely was impossible to put down!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2008

    Great read!

    Great sequel to Raising Atlantis. History, Politics, Religion, Conspiracy and Sci-Fi a great mixture with great characters and storyline, can't wait for the next book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2008

    Couldn't put it down...

    What a great, gripping, entertaining read! I could not put it down. It is a great read for anyone who just wants to lose themselves in a good old book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2008

    'Greanias just keeps getting better!'

    You will not be able to put this book down. I can not wait for the next one to come out.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    fast-paced conspiracy thriller

    On his deathbed, George Washington knew that there was a secret organization using the Masons as a cover that has one goal. The Alignment plans to one day use the newly created nation as a weapon at a time when it becomes powerful. However Washington handed a document to a trusted person who was to deliver it to someone whose descendents would make proper use of the information to preserve the Republic. --- Archeologist Dr. Conrad Yeats visits his father¿s gravesite where on his dad¿s stone is etched astrological signs and a number. Curious, he breaks the code and using the signs he realizes that everything points towards to a cornerstone of a Washington site where something apparently was buried. If he cannot find it in time, July 4th 2008 to be exact, a few days from now America will no longer exist. Instead the Alignment will rule. --- Similar in tone and content to National Treasure, THE ATLANTIS PROPHESY starts off at light speed and then accelerates. Conspiracy buffs will enjoy this roller coaster thriller as intrigue is the norm with many characters having secret operations leading to the hero unsure of who to trust spinally as he learns the Alignment has taken over much of the government and other major national components. Thomas Greanias makes it wild DC ride plausible as the Republic is being taken over from within. --- Harriet Klausner

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    Posted May 31, 2011

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    Posted August 27, 2010

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