Customer Reviews for

Augustus: The Life of Rome's First Emperor

Average Rating 4
( 43 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(19)

4 Star

(14)

3 Star

(8)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 43 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 3
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2014

    Th only book I as a student enjoyed reading on the 1st roman emporer

    I as a student have pledged to read a biograophy on every roman emporer. This one being my first, though i read julius caeser augustas was considered the first emporer. It would take a great deal of time and hardship to get togetherr the information this author has provided. And his knowledge of Roman culture gives great insight towards the events that lead up to himtaking the crown.

    But unlike most authors Anthony Everitt gives that flow to reading that is essential to keep ones attention while reading, instead of just a list of facts

    aspects of roman cultures are entiwned into the reading and mentioned at the appropriate time that those aspects would play a hand in Octavian, later to be known as Augustas's life

    This book on the technical first roman empoerer, since caeser was established dictator for life and augustas technically being the first emporer.

    A few examples would be how he mentions at the begining Octavians name will be changed by the senate to Augusts meaning splended and how he origenally he was Octavian, the book after establishing that he will be augustas, reffers to him as Octavius until he reaches the point in time (and in the book) that his name was changed, then the author reffers to him as Augustus. It also mentions once the child reaches a certain age that he becomes a man, all the things that become apparen in his life once he reieves the Toga Virilus, his toga of manhood, from then on all the Aspects in reffering to his time as a man are introduced. Though the Author foreshadows these things in the begining.

    This Biography is so smoothly written that one does not need an interest in the emporer per say, for one to be enlightened about Rome, politics, warfare and the legacy of emporers to come and how the heirs were killed of and the runndr up chosen tiberius.

    You will have a great deal of fresh knowledge on roman culture politics and warfare, as well as the second triumvant, You will learn new things of rome in every way that effected the emporrers life and the people he ruled over

    This gives a detailed in depth look of the campaigns he and mart antony whent through to take down the conspiritors of His adopted father Julius Caesers assasination.as well as the civil war that took place in the blockading in Egypt where He ingaged in the new civil war between mark anonies thabor of egypt, as well as Octavians right hand man, a brilliant naval commander which Augustas victories with owes him his carreer, he ramained a lifelong friend of agrippa long after the civil war was over The author gos through the aspects of the military campaigns brilliantly.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2014

    I dont care

    It sucks

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2014

    Very good read

    Got this book for a history class, can't put it down :-)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2013

    Recommended

    In this book we meet Augustus and the people around him, in Rome and elsewhere. We also are introduced to the culture and politics of Rome during this period of its history. This book is well written and informative; I recommend it for anyone who enjoys history.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 10, 2012

    Well worth the money and time to read. The research Everitt has

    Well worth the money and time to read. The research Everitt has performed to provide this biography is unbelievable and is difficult to put it down. He as an amazing person to actually come up against some of the most powerful people in the world and end up becoming the Emperor. I look forward to my next trip to Rome to see his home. It is very balanced and relates to the reader the realities of the times and life. Highly Recommend this book. Kudos to Everitt. I also read his Hadrian and it too is outstanding.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 28, 2011

    Even-Handed Approach to Augustus's Life

    This was a thorough and scholarly treatment of Augustus' life and times. Well-written, though at times it seemed tedious because of the scholastic desire to remain non-committal on questionable points that had little support in written records. Overall, I found it an enlightening presentation of its subject, and I learned a great deal from it. At times, the author seemed a little too eager to explain the sexual mores of the time. At other times, his comments seemed appropriate to the subject at hand.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 23, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Terrific Bio on Amazing Life

    Anthony Everitt's "Augustus" is a solid biography on one of history's most influential people. Augustus, born Gaius Octavius September 23, in 63 BC, lived to the ripe old age of 77 and ruled the Roman Empire for almost 45 years...both staggering amounts of time considering the average lifespan 2000 years ago and the average lifespan of Roman politician.

    He is arguably one of the most impactful individuals ever to roam the earth. His existence intersected Julius Caesar (his grand-uncle and adopted father), Marc Antony (primary competitor for the Roman throne), Cleopatra (Antony's lover, and co-competitor for Roman throne), Jesus Christ (born during his reign), the Battle of Teutoberg Forest (key moment in empire's expansion).

    Everitt provides peeks into Augustus' life at all stages and ages. Some of the views are limited, thin or highly speculative as necessitated by the sources at Everitt's disposal. As he does in his biography of another engimatic Roman leader, "Hadrian", Everitt speculates and analyzes multiple sources when inconsistencies arise. Much time is spent laying out the political atmosphere, and complex interrelationships that provide the context and backdrop for this incredibly intense period of history.

    What's enjoyable about Everitt is his narrative approach to the biography. Many elements of Augustus' life are highlighted with vignettes and stories. I particularly enjoyed his chapter on the day in the life of the Emperor, cobbled together from specific and non-specific references. The chapters on his adopted father's rise and downfall are fascinating as well, though it's difficult to keep up with the names of people, places and battles. It's particularly frustrating keeping track of individuals with similar names (there were two different "Brutuses" involved in Caesar's murder, for example). Everitt does his best to reminding the reader of re-introduced characters.

    "Augustus" is similar to Everitt's "Hadrian" in that one comes away unable to fully reconcile what kind of man Augustus was. How did the younger Octavian go from a sickly and almost accidental high stakes political player, to the self assured rebuilder of the Roman world? Everitt writes that he was "devious, untrustworthy, and bloodthirsty. But once he established his authority, he governed efficiently and justly, generally allowed freedom of speech, and promoted the rule of the law." Family was important - he and Livia were together for 50 years - but when his limits were tested, he reacted severely. In his later years, Augustus' daughter Julia was shut out of his life and exiled for the remainder of hers. His grandson Agrippa Postumus, while the only remaining successor by blood, was also banished.

    Everitt points to Augustus' political reforms as some of his most courageous feats even though some took tweaking over time to get right, and some never stuck at all. He attempted to reset moral perspectives of the Roman elite. He instituted a governmental bureaucracy (Augustus-aucracy?) that paved the way for governmental growth (and, oddly enough, greater efficiencies).

    The book is fact-filled, well written, highly notated and comes with several maps, photos and drawings, and a list of suggested reading.

    For those interested in a very readable biography of Augustus, but also a anthropological study of the time in which he lived, then I'd highly recommend this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 19, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Augustus by Everitt overrated

    Augustus is an entertaining read and somewhat informative, but it is weighed down by a number of statements by Everitt of which we could say: "That's just your opinion, man." What is particularly frustrating is the way that Everitt presents his opinion as if it is yet another researched fact. This makes me doubt the historical validity of the book in general, because Everitt obviously cannot separate fact from prejudice.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2007

    Richard Sallese

    Everitt biography of Augustus is excellent. The book has it all sex, voilence, murder and conspiracy. He was Rome's first Emperor and yet not enough is written about him. Overall I enjoyed and learned a great deal about Rome's first Emperor and enjoyed the journey through history.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2007

    One of the best biographies ever!

    I have read many biographies, and a few books on Roman history, but this is one of the best books to combine the two ever. Everitt combines scholarship with a clear narrative style, mixing narrative with quotes from contemporary authors such as Ovid, Virgil, Livy, etc. He also lucidly describes Roman life in the age of Augustus with depth and clarity. Everitt's love of the subject(s) he writes about is obvious throughout, and it is hard not to fall in love too. It moves really fast through history at times, but this can be blamed more on the lack of authoritative biographical and historical records than on any fault of the author. Definitely a must read for any Classical History buffs.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2007

    Excellent

    A splendid insight into the life of Octavian and his rise to power. Well researched and well written.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2006

    Bestseller-Material

    As in his earlier book on Cicero, Everett achieves with apparent ease to bring the life and times of Augustus to the reader in a most appealing and riveting manner. Honest to a fault when it comes to historic lacunas, Everett mixes facts and general background in a way that he creates a continuing story line that keeps the reader's attention from the first page. Clearly, a 'must-read', even for those whose interest in history is more peripheral.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 43 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 3