Customer Reviews for

The Awakening: And Selected Short Stories

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Best short stories I have ever read

I read Kate Chopin's The Awakening for a Lit course.I have read many books.Chopin's stories stay in my mind.I remember her characters as REAL people.

posted by Anonymous on January 2, 2005

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Most Helpful Critical Review

10 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

Worst book ever!

This book was a waste of my money. The book had too many languages in it. The story line made absolutely no sense. The book was very slow from beginning to end. Im gonna warn you right now.....this book will waste your time and money.

posted by 8667145 on November 9, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2012

    You don't have to like the characters to like the book

    It was difficult for me to like, sympathize or empathize with any of the main characters in this book. Nevertheless, this is an interesting character profile of a member of the "me generation" born 100 years too early, set deep within creole New Orleans society. An intellectually satisfying read.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 2, 2013

    A Classic worth reading

    Kate Chopin was featured in the St. Louis history museum in Forest Park (Free admission -- A wonderful city to visit!) so I decided to read one of her novels. A daring subject and approach for a female writer of her time. Typically existential for the period. A good book for understanding southern culture or women's issues in the 1800's. Suitable for reading for High School students.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 24, 2013

    An Interesting Look at Early Feminism

    I liked this book. All the characters are flawed, but good and sympathetic nonetheless. Though Edna is definitely not one of the nobler protagonists, the reader does sympathize with her plight to find her own identity in a world where she has been defined by her relation to others (mother, daughter, etc.). Not much happens in the book, but I found each character interesting enough to care about them to the end.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2013

    So funny!

    I really enjoyed this book. It made me laugh out loud (literally) several times!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2012

    Great read

    Loved this book. Found some of the themes applicable to todays life.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2014

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    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2013

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    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 10, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Freedom as a Theme in Chopin and Miller MSigado

    Within the books, Awakening and The Crucible, the common theme of freedom is shown throughout the books in the characters, how they act, what they want, and freedom from the events that have occurred in the present or in the past.
    In the book The Awakening, Edna, the main character, seems to want freedom in different aspects of her life. Edna does not do the motherly chores that are expected of her by her husband and town. She also becomes interested in Robert and another man Alcee in the book which makes it seem as though Edna is tired of her husband and how he treats her. Edna also wants freedom from her heritage because she wants to be more carefree like the people in New Orleans, but cannot release herself because of the way that she was brought up. Edna also seems to want to have freedom from her family and not be tied down by their wants for her. Edna seems to be ashamed of her past in a way and the way that she has acted among people and seems to want to become a freer more carefree person than she truly is. You can see the slow transformation within Edna as she changes from a faithful quiet woman to a bolder, more carefree woman who wants to live life.
    In the book, The Crucible, the accused witches are constantly looking for ways to be free and not accused of witchcraft. They want to live their lives normally again without worrying about being killed or hung. Also, John Proctor wants to be free in a way from the life he lives and he wants to be free to have an opinion. Proctor is controlled by his wife and wants to stand up for his true beliefs without being judged. The town wants their freedom back as well, but they want to be free from the spirit of witchcraft that they feel is haunting their town and its people.
    Overall, it is important to realize how the theme of freedom has influenced these novels. It is shown through the characters and their actions and wants and events that have occurred throughout the present and past. The themes help us discover more about the books and help us realize how novels can be connected by one common theme that they share.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2009

    Oppression in Awakening and the Crucible by C. Leonard

    Oppression in the Awakening and the Crucible
    Oppression creates unique situations which result in the untimely deaths
    Oppression is a common thread between these two books. In Awakening, Edna represents the caged parrot at the beginning of the book. The bird speaks French and English, but it also speaks a language that nobody understands, and it seems to be only talking to the mockingbird. The only other person that understands Edna's feelings is the pianist, as she has been molded by society to fit certain criteria. The oppression that Edna feels comes from being in high society without being able to identify with them, and her husband does not help her, as he does not always seem to appreciate her, and treats her like a possession. Edna realizes this, and tries to become her own woman, and become independent, because she wants to get away from Leonce and because she loves Robert. However, she is similarly oppressed by Robert as he also treats her like a possession, and asks at one point if Leonce has given her up. Edna replies yes, but realizes that while she was trying to get away from society, Robert conforms to the views of women in society, and treats her like property; therefore, she is oppressed similarly as before with her husband. She is not free to make her own choices, and men want to own her like a possession, which she does not want, and this represents the Victorian views of women at this time in history. Eventually, Edna commits suicide because she cannot handle the oppression that she faces. This is similar to the oppression that occurs in the Proctor household, where Mary is treated like a slave by Elizabeth, because she is worried about her relationship with Proctor. This oppression is created by fear, and by actions of others beside oneself. Based on Elizabeth's fear that Mary will take her place with Proctor, she treats her like a slave to keep her busy and away from Proctor. If Proctor is as clean as he says it is, then there is no reason to treat Mary like a slave. But, because Proctor has done this before with Abigail, Elizabeth is wary of Mary. Because Abigail manipulates everyone she knows, Elizabeth is labeled a witch, and Proctor is sentenced to death for not confessing, along with eighteen other people.
    This oppression is deadly. In both the Awakening and the Crucible, Edna commits suicide, and nineteen people that are innocent are put to death by a system trying to uphold its honor. Oppression results in the death of more people, and causes suicides.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2004

    Great depiction of the 19th century woman

    I was writing an essay on Kate Chopin and I didn't really know what she was famous for but when I got on the internet and looked her up and found that she had a book called the Awakenings, I was convinced it wasn't that great, yet I picked it up and read it anyways. I found that it gave an excellent depiction of the women of the 19th century and it made me cry, because she was right on the target of what many women felt, but didn't have the courage to say. She was an excellent writer and she made some excellent points and I think every woman needs to pick up a copy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2002

    Interesting perspective

    I enjoyed watching Edna's journey in finding herself, but was perplexed at the concept that she only finds herself through other men. A contradiction in reality of "true" feminism, this books comes as close as Chopin's time period warranted.

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