Customer Reviews for

The Awakening

Average Rating 3.5
( 148 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Best short stories I have ever read

I read Kate Chopin's The Awakening for a Lit course.I have read many books.Chopin's stories stay in my mind.I remember her characters as REAL people.

posted by Anonymous on January 2, 2005

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Most Helpful Critical Review

10 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

Worst book ever!

This book was a waste of my money. The book had too many languages in it. The story line made absolutely no sense. The book was very slow from beginning to end. Im gonna warn you right now.....this book will waste your time and money.

posted by 8667145 on November 9, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2005

    Best short stories I have ever read

    I read Kate Chopin's The Awakening for a Lit course.I have read many books.Chopin's stories stay in my mind.I remember her characters as REAL people.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    Intelligently written and soul provocing Ingtelligently written and soul stiring

    Written with provocative undertone, chopin would have a grateful appause in the 21st century

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 11, 2011

    Awakening of the Mind

    "I would give up the unessential; I would give up my money, I would give up my life for my children; but I wouldn't give myself." THE AWAKENING written by Kate Chopin portraits a world back in the late 1800s. A fascinating story of the life of a young woman, who is also a wife and a mother, shows challenges against the values of the world during that particular time period. Kate Chopin describes a world that she has been dreaming of, that she believes in women can say something rather than being controlled by men. The protagonist went against the important moral issue that was highly valued back in those days. The author applied adultery issues into the life of the main character to describe her journey towards freedom and independence. The story itself is a well-written piece, which made it easier for readers to take a quick glance into a world that has been nearly hundred years ago. Even though the novel is one of the most famous classic pieces, the clear usage of language and style of the author helped the readers in the process of understanding the conflicts. Kate Chopin, an explorer who challenged the idea of sexuality in American literature back in 1800s will guide readers to awaken their minds of ideas of individuality and liberty, which are concepts that we can observe in today's world thankful to the pioneer authors.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2010

    good book- lousy scan!

    This is one of the google scanned books- the story is good but THE SCAN IS AWFUL -SPEND A BUCK & GET A GOOD COPY or your going to get alot of googly fonts & what looks almost like wingding font

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2014

    Thought provoking read

    This was a book club selection at our office and it really caused a stir in the participants -- such a wide variety of thoughts about the book.

    I really enjoyed it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2011

    So great

    This is one of my favorite books! So glad that it's only $.95! (;

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 26, 2011

    Wonderful discovery

    This is such a well written book by an overlooked author who died ...don't some of the best ? ...too soon. I dreaded the ending of my first Nook book. Had I been born in that milieu, would I have been a woman like Edna, I wondered as I read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 11, 2009

    zabbott review

    Freedom is a dominant nominal theme in the selected readings, "The Awakening" and "The Crucible". In "The Crucible" the entire village of Salem seeks freedom from the lies, witchcraft, and the oppression in and around the village. In "The Awakening", Edna seeks freedom from her husband, life, and finds freedom when she finally swims alone.
    The girls falsely accuse innocent people of being witches intentionally, I think the people of the village are seeking freedom from the lies the girls are telling, but some think they are telling the truth. Everyone is seeking freedom from the accusations, because they do not want to be the next victim to be accused of witchcraft. The town is old and run down, and the witchcraft accusations are taking a toll on everyone, and everyone is looking for freedom from the oppression that circles the town, as well as in surrounding towns. The large number of death took a toll on everyone in town.
    Ever since Edna married her husband, she had been looking for freedom, she was never truly happy with her spouse, and I feel that all she really wanted was freedom. When she could not gain that freedom, she wanted to be free from life. She was not happy with her husband; all Edna really wanted was to be happy and free. I think she chose to take her life, because she could not gain that sense of freedom. When she swam out by herself for the first time, this showed freedom, because women back then were not ever thought of to do anything but take care of the family. She showed that she was free from the stereotype of the common woman.
    Ultimately I think freedom was the dominant theme in these selections, because the main characters in each novel wanted freedom. The entire town of Salem wanted to be free from the witchcraft accusations. Too much death took a toll on the village people. Edna took her life to be free, this shows that the dominant idea throughout was freedom, and this connects these novels well.

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  • Posted September 10, 2009

    The Awakening review by S.Kim

    In "The Awakening", Edna, expresses her true feeling about Robert, has less interest in her family, and begins to express herself by painting or enjoying other artistic matters. Edna is a normal housewife, has two children and somewhat wealthy household. However, she doesn't feel happy about her situation and she feels trapped in the whole family theme. She finally meets a young man, Robert, and falls in love. During these time period, she expresses her true feeling about Robert by missing him and wondering about him a lot. She starts to lose her interest on her husband and on her children, and begins to enjoy herself by listening to music and painting; a new way to express her true feeling and to enjoy rest of her life by full filing herself. She eventually moves out from her original house for a break, and lives by herself in her little house. In her own new space, she loves the freedom and individualism. However, Robert denies her love because she has a family and leaves Edna. Edna, once again was disappointed by the fact that she cannot enjoy her life by doing the things what her true feeling wants to do, she decides to find her freedom by swimming away; choosing death.
    In the Awakening, truth plays an important role, because the truth shows one woman's desires to become free from her current position (house-wife), to love a man she truly loves, and to live her life by mainly expressing her true individualism. The story concludes, unfortunately with her death, because she realized she couldn't full fill her true desires in this world.

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  • Posted September 10, 2009

    Review

    I believe that loyalty was clearly a theme in both of these books. Whether the characters in these books were loyal or not, it is an idea that almost all of the characters struggled with.
    In the awakening, I believe Edna is a perfect example of the struggle with loyalty. One reason is that she struggled to hold back her love for Robert. It was clear even in the beginning of the story that Edna was going to fall in love with Robert, even though she was married to Leonce. I believe that this is shows just how she felt about loyalty and that she didn't too much think about it. Also in the Awakening, Edna even has problems staying loyal to Robert, her new claimed love. The one man continues to come over and have dinner with her, and she knows that it leads to sexual acts, but she can't be loyal enough to deny the acts, to be faithful to Robert or especially Leonce, her husband. In the end of the book, it does become apparent that loyalty has been in the back of Edna's head the whole time. When Edna's friend tells her to think of the kids, it stops her in her tracks, she starts to feel that what she is doing is wrong, and ultimately her lack of loyalty is the driving force that leads her to take her own life.
    In the Crucible the same struggle with loyalty occurs. One of the main positive examples is shown when Parssis does not tell the names of the other accused and says that he will only give his name. This could be seen more as a personal loyalty and that he was not going to let her other emotions ruin what he believed was right and wrong. Another example of lack loyalty is shown when all the girls promise not to speak of what happened in the woods and then one of them caves in and tells. Although she told for the right reason, you could say that she was not loyal to her friends. And the most glaring example of lack of loyalty is in the court system itself. So many people in the story were accused and suffered the consciences for things they were not rightly accused of. I also find it contradicting that the court room would also have to be loyal and accept these accusations although they might not have been true at all.
    In both of these stories the characters struggled to say to loyal to either themselves or to others. The lack of loyalty led to all of the turmoil in these stories and shows us today why loyalty is so important. Although most of us are not loyal, we can still hope that stories like these give us negative examples so that we can learn from history and not repeat our mistakes.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2007

    Amazing Book

    I know most people find this book to be complete drivel, but it is actually really good. It is a feminism novel and everyone seems to have a problem with this, though I'm not sure why. But it was a different and great read. I had to read it my sophmore year in highschool. I love Chopin's writing style and the characters. If you like books from Sylvia Plath or Charlotte Perkins Gilman, you have to read this book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2003

    Self Discovery

    I believe this book touches on the issue that almost everyone deals with in their life time, discovering who they really are.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 1999

    This is an amazing book!

    'The Awakening' is the reflection of an époque that never allowed women to express their opinion. Through its pages, the reader can taste the meaning of being a woman in the last century. Kate Chopin shows us the dimension of freedom through the mind of a woman who never was free. Through Edna's awakening, Kate Chopin reveals the significance of being authentic, of fighting for beliefs, and of fighting against oppression. Knowing Edna, we can feel a woman's desire. In summary, 'The Awakening' is full of symbolism that allows the reader to look for answers and connect ideas.

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    Posted June 19, 2011

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