Customer Reviews for

Bait and Switch: The (Futile) Pursuit of the American Dream

Average Rating 3
( 35 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(11)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(9)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Reality, and those who are motivated to deny it.

I am a Computer Programmer who could find a job in a month back in the early nineties. Recently it took twenty two months. Yet we are told that there is a shortage. The book is right on the mark.

posted by Anonymous on October 27, 2007

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

She barely looked for a job!

Halfway through the book, a career coach tells Barbara 'Alexander' that she seems . . 'angry.' She takes umbrage at the comment. In reality, the career coach's accusation may be the understatement of the century for readers of this lethargic study of a journalist hopi...
Halfway through the book, a career coach tells Barbara 'Alexander' that she seems . . 'angry.' She takes umbrage at the comment. In reality, the career coach's accusation may be the understatement of the century for readers of this lethargic study of a journalist hoping to land an executive-level job. She never does take a job--though she was offered two--but instead spends most of the book meeting with career coaches and slithering in and out of job fairs and support groups for fellow job seekers. Is she angry? I would say so, but it's hard to tell who is angrier--Barbara 'Alexander' the fictional job seeker, or Barbara Ehrenreich, the author. She doesn't find an 'acceptable' job for a long list of reasons. First of all, she is much, much older than the average job seeker. Enhrenreich doesn't reveal her exact age, but do the math: this is a woman who got her doctoral degree in the late 1960s. That makes her 60+ at the time she was researching and writing this book. [n.b. the woman on the cover of this book, a pretty, young blonde woman in her 20s, is definitely not Barbara Ehrenreich. the woman is a model]Second, she has very little experience to offer by way of her fabricated resume. She was looking for an 'executive-level' job despite presenting a career that consisted mostly of consulting. Third, she is so contemptuous of the corporate workplace, career coaches, and many of the people she encounters throughout her journey. I think a lot of the people she met thought she was angry, old, unmotivated, poorly dressed, officious, unqualified, or all of the above. On a final note, I don't think she tried very hard to look for a job. She seemed all too eager to post her 'resume' on job boards, and all too resistent to applying for 'real' jobs or networking with actual employers.

posted by Anonymous on August 27, 2007

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 review with 2 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2009

    Nothing we didn't already know

    This book was on the struggle white-collar workers go through to get a job. The book does a good job of showing how hard it is to get that perfect job you want in America. Ehrenreich goes through many different job fairs, career coaches, and networking groups to try and obtain a job and in six months still doesn't get one that fits her standards. She talks a lot about how companies try to make it sound like their companies are what you want to work for and then right when you want to get the job they tell you your real salary and how you aren¿t getting very good benefits. But by just listening to the news we also know this is going on. We all know about how some CEO's can get greedy and can keep making big money while they just lower their employees salaries and benefits. Also in the news we hear about all the downsizing and offshoring that is going on in America and this book just shows the readers more examples of this. <BR/>So overall I think the book does a good job of showing us examples of how hard it is for white-collar employees to get their perfect jobs and keep them but you don't necessarily need to read this book to figure this out.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 review with 2 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1