Customer Reviews for

Dracula (Barnes & Noble Collectible Editions)

Average Rating 4.5
( 40 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

CLASSY...WORTH THE EFFORT!

Although not as elaborate as most of the other offerings in the "Leatherbound Classics" series, "Dracula", and its companion pieces, is well made and well appointed with an attractive red leather cover, nicely embellished with classic styled imprinting, color-stained en...
Although not as elaborate as most of the other offerings in the "Leatherbound Classics" series, "Dracula", and its companion pieces, is well made and well appointed with an attractive red leather cover, nicely embellished with classic styled imprinting, color-stained end pages, colorful, marbled end papers, and raised hub spine. The story is the standard fare in a classy package, offered in the typical "octavo" 8-inch book size. It is timely offered in the present economy, and is appropriately priced. It will be at home on the book shelf amongst other fine, collectible books and classic literature...it has my "two thumbs up"!

posted by paulkatrenak on February 19, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

11 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

doesnt fit the collection

I own 10 books in the leatherbound classics collection and couldnt be happier with them. However I received 3 new books this morning, books that were advertised as part of this fine collection and was sadly disappointed. Dracula, Huck Finn, and Pride and Prejudice, or a...
I own 10 books in the leatherbound classics collection and couldnt be happier with them. However I received 3 new books this morning, books that were advertised as part of this fine collection and was sadly disappointed. Dracula, Huck Finn, and Pride and Prejudice, or at least the way they were published, are not worthy of this collection.
They are of smaller demension, have no cover illustration, are lacking the gold page edging and are of a much more standard quality than the other books of the series. Absolutely disappointed the publisher decided to go cheap on us.

posted by StevenLippard on February 18, 2011

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  • Posted July 25, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A thrilling journey back to the Victorian beginning of popular culture's vampire obsession

    After reading The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova - a modern day re-telling of the Dracula legend, I just had to follow it with the Bram Stoker original. It's been awhile since I read a classic piece of literature (back in January, I delved into Guy de Maupassant's Bel Ami), and it wasn't until about 50 pages in that I was able to adjust to the 19th century vernacular. While it took me longer to finish (about a week), it was well worth the extra effort to become immersed in a Gothic masterpiece.

    Before delving into the pages, my perception was tainted by the Dracula caricature distributed by Hollywood, most notably the immortal 1931 Bella Lugosi performance of a wild-eyed, cape-wearing villain lurking in the shadows. I didn't know much about Stoker's actual storyline, and I was surprised at how fleetingly the count appears in the novel. Even though his motivations dictate the majority of the action, Dracula plays more of a supporting role letting a host of other characters take the lead.

    It's funny, but in both The Historian and this earlier rendition, Dracula comes across as cartoonish. For Stoker's 1897 audience, the limited development can be attributed to the fact that the subject of vampires was considered quite shocking for the time period. Yet as one of the main contributors to the horror genre canon, the writing style is nevertheless quaint and antiquated for 21st century sensibilities. Much of the dialogue comes across as affected with overly exaggerated emotion. It's like watching a silent movie filled with fluttering eyelashes and arched eyebrows with melodramatic lines such as, "On your living soul I charge you that you do not die - nay, nor think of death - till this great evil be past."

    I was not steeped in vampire lore and only recognized the name Van Helsing from the 2004 movie starring Hugh Jackman. Needless to say, the vampire hunter of Stoker's creation is an elderly Dutch physician who speaks in stilted English and proceeds against his foe more through trial and error than any definitive knowledge. He employs the superstitions he encounters in his research to combat Dracula - garlic, a crucifix, even wafers of the Holy Eucharist. He comes across partly as a comedic figure who is bumbling through his investigation, but in the end through happenstance or luck ends up on the right track.

    Stoker excels in setting a scene. He is a master at creating atmosphere. It feels as if you are sitting in the horse-drawn carriage with Jonathan Harker as he ascends the Carpathian Mountains to the very heart of Dracula's lair. You can feel the mist in your face. You can hear the wolves howling in the distance. You can see the terror in the eyes of his fellow passengers. The aura of foreboding is palpable. Another captivating scene is the arrival of Dracula's ship at the English port of Whitby. A horrific storm heralds the vessel's appearance on the horizon. Battling the wind and waves, it runs aground of its own accord without a crew. The body of the dead captain is tied to the wheel, a crucifix in his lifeless hands. Horror writing doesn't get much better than this.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 19, 2013

    I have read many vampire stories, from the scary (Salem's Lot)

    I have read many vampire stories, from the scary (Salem's Lot) to the romantic (Twilight) but, despite it's age, this is by far the creepiest vampire novel I have read. In fact, this is the only vampire story that has ever disturbed my sleep. The old-world language and diary format lend it an air of tension to this novel that is lacking in other vampire books that I have read. Most horror books are scary, but fairly predictable. Not so, Bram Stoker's Dracula. I found this story to be intriguing and enthralling and I found myself unable to put it down. This is the original vampire novel and, in my opinion, still the best.

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    Posted September 16, 2013

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    Posted March 23, 2011

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    Posted June 23, 2011

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