Customer Reviews for

One Hundred Years of Solitude (Barnes & Noble Collectible Editions)

Average Rating 4.5
( 11 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

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1 Star

(1)

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  • Posted August 11, 2011

    Awful!!

    Barns & Noble should be ashamed of this one. I have bought several in this series. I was looking forward to this because I love this story. It is a cheap vinyl. No embossing or debossing like the rest of the series. The ink was even streaked on the printing of the cover. The in paper on the inside of the book was very cheap. It reminds me of a card stock. Even the gold was edge was cheaply done. Bad! Bad! Bad!!!

    6 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 16, 2012

    In the stunning novel 100 Years of Solitude, Gabriel Marquez is

    In the stunning novel 100 Years of Solitude, Gabriel Marquez is able to capture what life was like for the Buendia family in the 16th and 17th century. In the novel, Marquez covers seven generations of the family and how each one lived and worked together in the village of Macondo, which is supposed to represent Columbia. The story begins with Jose Arcadio Buendia and his dream; a dream that is the city of Macondo, a city of mirrors that reflects the world. He builds this town and his wife and his son come with him as he builds his utopic city. The village expands greatly and soon white settlers are coming in and taking over certain parts of the land. Buendia’s second son, Aureliano Buendia was the first person to be born in Macondo, and was very unusual. He was a warrior and preferred to be addressed in his later years as Colonel Aureliano Buendia.  The third generation consists of Arcadio, Jose Arcadio’s (Buendia’s first son) son.  Aureliano has seventeen sons, all by unknown women and which die in mysterious ways. The other four generations aren’t focused on much until later in the novel. The main part of the novel focuses on the second and the third generations. The reoccurring theme that is highlighted in this novel are ghosts. Several characters are visited by ghosts and they represent the symbols of the past. Marquez also uses colors as symbols. He does this with flowers and with the sky and with the different color garments that the characters wear throughout the novel. The two colors that are most frequently used are yellow and gold. Yellow is supposed to signal that death and destruction will soon arise, while gold shows the economic wealth growing. It’s these very small things that eventually play a big part in this novel. Also incorporated into this book is the whole background of Columbia. Upon first reading this novel, I didn’t understand some of the characters. But after a closer examination, I saw how some of the characters were certain parts of Columbia and how they changed showed how the country was developing. The novel itself is the story of how Latin America was discovered by European explorers and how the people and the country adjust to the constantly changing conditions.  Overall, I enjoyed this book. I would suggest it to someone with a vast vocabulary, as some words in this book are above an average reading level. The characters in this book are very dynamic and it’s interesting and intriguing to see them grow and have families of their own. Their story seems to be constantly expanding, which makes it entertaining to read. However, everything is very symbolic, so people that won’t understand al of the references may be confused of how certain things work and why some things play out the ways that they do. I would recommend that people read the book multiple times and also look into the history of Columbia to get a true understanding of what Marquez was trying to capture. Although this may seem a bit extensive, it makes the book easier to understand. If someone were to read this just for fun, they would probably think that it was boring and hard to understand. If someone were to read this intellectually and with the intention of expanding their learning, they would truly enjoy the novel.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2011

    great book to read!!!

    loved it!!! have read it more than once!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 19, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    Gabriel García Márquez, Colombiano, máximo exponente de la Liter

    Gabriel García Márquez, Colombiano, máximo exponente de la Literatura Mundial en el Siglo XX. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted March 29, 2013

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    Posted August 1, 2013

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    Posted December 1, 2012

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    Posted December 22, 2013

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    Posted January 10, 2012

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    Posted December 30, 2013

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    Posted July 9, 2013

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