Customer Reviews for

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

Average Rating 3.5
( 612 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(221)

4 Star

(166)

3 Star

(120)

2 Star

(42)

1 Star

(63)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

38 out of 44 people found this review helpful.

Fantastic book - honest look at, and great tips for, the challenge of raising an intelligent accomplished child in America

I love love love this book! I know it's been controversial, but those that hate this book are simply threatened by it. As a woman raised by the quintessential "chinese" mother (although she was polish, and had never even been to china), I completely agree with Chua's pe...
I love love love this book! I know it's been controversial, but those that hate this book are simply threatened by it. As a woman raised by the quintessential "chinese" mother (although she was polish, and had never even been to china), I completely agree with Chua's perspective on child-raising. As she so correctly notes, while the "chinese-mother" school of child raising can mean your child and you have storied pitched battles throughout their childhood, if done correctly (with the deep love and humor both Chua and my own mother have with regard to their children), it results in accomplished, satisfied, and stable adults who genuinely love and respect their parents for the incredible effort and love put into raising them. My own anecdoctal evidence supports this conclusion: I find that I have a much healthier, closer and more enjoyable relationship with my mother, as well as to myself, than many of my friends and acquaintances raised by the traditional "american" model of permissive parents afraid to say "no" for fear of damaging their allegedly delicate self-worth.
The delightful thing about Chua's book, however, is that it is not simply a dry manifesto about the virtues of raising children the "Tiger" way. Rather, she intervenes her delightfully personal, honest story with comments showing her ability to both laugh at herself and learn from her mistakes (which, as any parent knows, are unavoidable in some degree!). Even for those of you that won't gasp with recognition at some of Chua's stories, it is a delightful book which is absolutely worth reading with an open mind, especially if you have children or plan to have children.

posted by 6687513 on January 17, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

13 out of 38 people found this review helpful.

YIKES!

Somewhere between "Angela's Ashes" and "Tiger Mother" lies the key to good parenting. I am a psychologist and I will be seeing her kids on the couch in about six years.

posted by 5169888 on January 20, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 120 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 6
  • Posted February 9, 2011

    Compelling, strange, and definitely recommended

    I originally did not intend to read this book, feeling it was not worth the effort but after reading some reviews and Amy Chua's appearance on the Colbert Report I was compelled to read it. It was unreasonably short and discombobulated, the chapters and even the paragraphs jumping from one moment to another two, three, even ten years ahead or behind, but it was still a decent read that I implore parents of all walks to read. While you may be sitting there, eyebrows raised and asking yourself "how can a mother do that?" there are many things that can be taken away from this book. Values that all people should instill in their children, ideals that should be taken with a grain of salt, and several "how to make your child resent you" moments that you should be careful to avoid. To start, Amy Chua begins that she originally had intended this book to show how "Chinese" parenting is somehow superior, but was eventually "humbled" by her rebellious thirteen year old Louisa, whom was affectionately referred to as Lulu, in a restaurant in Russia after an argument over caviar. After Chua called her daughter a "barbarian", "savage", and some other harsh words, Lulu lashed out and gave her mother her opinion of her. Now I could make this a long, winded, and completely unneeded opinion drop of my views of her parenting, but as I said - it is unneeded. This is simply a memoir of one woman's plight to raise her daughters, as well as the woman's identity crisis and inability to distinguish herself, a Chinese-American, from her parents Immigrated Chinese-Americans. That is not to say I did not learn something from Chua and her memoir, I have learned that of course parents are not as perfect as they try so hard to be. I have learned that, should I ever chose to have kids, I want to instill the sort of excellence and togetherness Amy and Jed tried to instill in Sophia and Lulu. I also want to do something that Amy failed to do, instill a sense of passion and willingness to learn that she had to force upon her daughters. In short, this is definitely not a parenting book, it was originally intended to be (according to Chua's own opening paragraph "this is supposed to be a story of how Chinese parents are better at raising kids than Western ones. "But instead, it's about a bitter clash of cultures, a fleeting taste of glory, and how I was humbled by a thirteen-year-old.") but after the fateful event of Russian Caviar (this story having been written the day after said event), Chua reexamined her life, her parenting of her youngest daughter, and how she realized she isn't always right but sometimes forcing your children to do something they don't want to do (the violin, in this case) can bring a positive effect into a child's life. Just don't take it too far and you will toe the line between "gratitude" and "resentment".

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2011

    How I overcame became being little ms perfect to I'm not perfect, but then neither are you (And I still play a mean violin)

    Amy Chua opens the book by saying its a battle hymn of the tiger mother; but she really is battling herself throughout the book. This book should have been titled 'one woman's journey from being little ms perfect to Okay, i'm not perfect, but then neither are you.(and my children still play instruments better & get better grades" She is really comparing herself and her children to the standards her parents set up, against the
    lax standards she feels the culture has (from the beginning of the book to the last chapter).
    She assumes most (american) parents don't care about their childrens homework (they do).
    She assumes most americans have sleepovers.
    She is asking the question(s) which are "if I do this will I lose my identity as say, Irish or Italian or chinese.? And Amy Chua also raises the question how many ways do you have adopt/adapt before being losing one's identity as a chinese (high standards/high expectations/high achievements vs. (american) low standards/low expectations/low achievements.
    And at the end of the book, this conflict leaves her feeling angry--angry at herself, angry at her husband, and angry most of all at the American culture.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2012

    MUST READ THIS COMMENT

    The way Amy treats her two daughters is both terrible and interesting. I am only 12, but I already understand what harm this kind of parenting could cause. First, yelling and spanking a child above the age of 5 does nothing but break the bond between the child and parent. Second her way of treating her kids is practically mental or emotional abuse. Amy does not even let the kids have their own opinion and much less ask her for anything. The kind of person that this book portrays her is terrible, disgusting, rude, selfish, and disrespectful. Her children probably suffer from insecurity and fear. If I could sue Amy for child abuse, I would have already done it. This book shows nothing but an irresponsible woman taking care of her kids in the wrong way. The best way to care for a child is to love them, spend time with them, and obviously respect there opinion. The way of parenting mentioned in this book is basically abuse. I hope that if you are a parent and you read this, don't ever follow the steps of this crazy woman.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 6, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Designed to Shock!

    I read this memoir as part of a local book club. I was shocked at the way this mother treated her kids. All the references to the "Chinese Mother" versus the "Western Mother" were very racist even though there was some elements of truth throughout. I think many individuals from immigrant cultures work very hard to better themselves when they enter a foreign culture. It was still worth reading.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 6, 2012

    Eye opening

    I really enjoyed Amy's book. Felt insulted a few times, but got over it. Related with her on several topics. This book can open your eyes and give you a veiw from the outside. Thanks you Amy.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2012

    An interesting read.

    An interesting read, gives insight into how much commitment, sacrifice and focus and determination a mother has to raise her daughters to be the best. I am thankful my mother was not as ambitious and pushy like that.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2012

    It fills a void. Wish there are more books like it.

    It's a memoir by a Chinese-American writer, written with humor, dealing with bi-cultural upbringing. Where did all those seething reactions come from? Did the haters actually read the book? Makes one wonder what are their motives.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2012

    Ok

    This book is a intresting book, altough amy is WWAY too egotistical. Lets say she has a DIFFRENT view on what parenting means. She has her points, some annoying or inspiring, but in the end, she never says whether western parents have SOMETHING right, but rather she points everything else at everybody except herself. My mother has raised (well, raising) my sister and me and were good.
    This has been wrighten by a 10 year old.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 25, 2011

    Insightful and Thought Provoking

    I really enjoyed reading this book. Although I don't agree with Amy Chua's style of parenting, the book is very insightful and thought provoking. Her writing is a little disjointed because she jumps around in time, but the book is a quick, easy read. This would be a great book club book because it will spark a lot of discussion among all who read it. This is definitely just a memoir with Ms. Chua's personal opinions. This is in no way a researched scientific paper. I did find myself open-mouthed in disbelief at some of the things she did to and expected of her children. On the other hand, I thought it was pretty funny how she turned into a marshmallow around her dogs. It was an interesting read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2011

    Must read

    I was taken back at first to her approach to parenting her daughters. By the end I came to actually appreciate her thought process and her willingness to understand her 13yr old and "give her" her way. This is going to be a great conversation piece at the book club I'm in. Can't wait to discuss it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 16, 2011

    Lacking depth

    I feel that a large portion of the story was untold. I just don't understand why she didn't delve into her relationship with her husband. I also did not get a real sense of how much time she spent with her girls on academics. I read through the book quickly.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 11, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    It was a very good read. I do agree that good parenting is hard work and that parents should really nit give in too easily to their children's desires- i agree with her when she says that children often don't know whats best for themselves. However i really wonder how her husband feels when she criticizes 'westerners' even though i think she is referring to Americans. Overall i do admire her honesty.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2011

    EXTREME!

    I enjoyed reading this book, however, I hated the generalizations she made about "western" parenting! She was extremely harsh at times, and I felt that she could have been equally as effective without the verbal abuse! It's amazing how we have so many brillant contributers to society who didn't have mothers who treated them this way!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 22, 2011

    Honest story, quick read....

    Amy Chau is honest, honest, honest in her story/journey. It was an interesting and eye-opening read. Was shocked and a bit angry somtimes at her for parenting this way but interesting nonetheless. It was a quick read and I definitely would recommend to a friend.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 21, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    interesting read

    As parents, I think that we all have doubts on our ability to raise our kids well. Who is to say what method is the best when personalities play such a huge part in family dynamics. I think the book was an open ended honest story of wanting the best for your kids and the negative and positive results that happen.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 120 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 6