Customer Reviews for

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

Average Rating 3.5
( 613 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(222)

4 Star

(166)

3 Star

(120)

2 Star

(42)

1 Star

(63)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

38 out of 44 people found this review helpful.

Fantastic book - honest look at, and great tips for, the challenge of raising an intelligent accomplished child in America

I love love love this book! I know it's been controversial, but those that hate this book are simply threatened by it. As a woman raised by the quintessential "chinese" mother (although she was polish, and had never even been to china), I completely agree with Chua's pe...
I love love love this book! I know it's been controversial, but those that hate this book are simply threatened by it. As a woman raised by the quintessential "chinese" mother (although she was polish, and had never even been to china), I completely agree with Chua's perspective on child-raising. As she so correctly notes, while the "chinese-mother" school of child raising can mean your child and you have storied pitched battles throughout their childhood, if done correctly (with the deep love and humor both Chua and my own mother have with regard to their children), it results in accomplished, satisfied, and stable adults who genuinely love and respect their parents for the incredible effort and love put into raising them. My own anecdoctal evidence supports this conclusion: I find that I have a much healthier, closer and more enjoyable relationship with my mother, as well as to myself, than many of my friends and acquaintances raised by the traditional "american" model of permissive parents afraid to say "no" for fear of damaging their allegedly delicate self-worth.
The delightful thing about Chua's book, however, is that it is not simply a dry manifesto about the virtues of raising children the "Tiger" way. Rather, she intervenes her delightfully personal, honest story with comments showing her ability to both laugh at herself and learn from her mistakes (which, as any parent knows, are unavoidable in some degree!). Even for those of you that won't gasp with recognition at some of Chua's stories, it is a delightful book which is absolutely worth reading with an open mind, especially if you have children or plan to have children.

posted by 6687513 on January 17, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

13 out of 38 people found this review helpful.

YIKES!

Somewhere between "Angela's Ashes" and "Tiger Mother" lies the key to good parenting. I am a psychologist and I will be seeing her kids on the couch in about six years.

posted by 5169888 on January 20, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 166 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 9
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2011

    Pay attention

    For readers, some people on here aren't very observant. This is a MEMOIR, not a self-help book on how to raise children. I knew that it was a memoir before I read it, but I also read her interview in Oprah magazine. She doesn't want to insult Western cultures and our way of child rearing, but it is very interesting to see her side, how she was raised, and how she raised her children. Once again, it's a MEMOIR, and take it as that and leave it. Not everyone agrees how to raise their child, and parents dislike unsolicted advice on how to raise children (especially me, a mother of twins) because each child is different, and each experience is different (not everyone knows how to raise multiples). So, just because you are a 'child development' specialist or psychologist, doesn't mean you're an expert. I personally was very interested in the differences between each culture (in the Chinese culture, not everyone agrees with the author either) and the effects the parents had on their children. Take it or leave it, no one is telling you how to raise your child. I mostly disagreed with it, but I knew it was just a book, and it was nice when she learned a big lesson. Calm down.

    21 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 9, 2011

    Funny and insightful read

    As a parent, I really enjoyed this book. I decided to read it after reading the article in Time about it. It really helped me understand my husband (who is a 'Tiger Dad'). Chua admits she is not perfect, but she shows that as parents if we set our expectations high, our children will strive to reach them. I have seen this first hand with my own children.

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2011

    Stolen Childhood

    I am sure Amy had the best intention in her mind. However, I felt so sad for her kids and was glad that Lulu rose up against her. I hope they have a happy ending.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2011

    Don't judge until you've read

    And all this time I thought I was raised by Irish parents. Who knew they were Chinese in disguise! You have to read the whole book before you can judge the content. Yes, in the opening chapters she makes some shocking statements, but as you read on you love her open honest discussion about how she raised her children. Perfect parenting? No. But is there really such a thing?

    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 2, 2013

    funny and blunt

    I think the people who are ripping on this book either are those who haven't read it beyond the WSJ article and other articles written about this book, or those who don't get irony and self-deprecating humor.

    I am Chinese, though didn't have a tiger mom. I intend to raise my kids somewhat like Chua did, but slightly less extreme and with more positive reinforcement for when they do get it right.

    Also I think the kids' environment matters more than parenting in how they turn out. Kids care more about what their peers think than what their parents tell them to do. That's what happened in my case, though my own parents were pretty laissez-faire about everything, I was surrounded by kids who had "tiger mothers". These kids were mostly Asian, Jewish, and Indian. So it was as if I was raised by a tiger mother.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2013

    Interesting book

    I found this to be an interesting book on child raising. It is written as a memoir and not as parenting guide. I also think most of the media hype about this book is mislesding and inaccurate.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 23, 2012

    There's lots to admire in this parenting saga. I'm glad to see s

    There's lots to admire in this parenting saga. I'm glad to see such conviction that kids are strong and don't need protection from challenges. The whole Chua family network including the dogs gets into the drama, and things get hotter than hell's kitchen. It's a titanic clash of wills, and a story I wish every family could discuss.

    Amy Chua doesn't really care if her kids get rich or famous. She just wants them to stand head and shoulders above all competitors, for the sheer excellence of it. I don't think it's a Chinese thing. It's an immigrant thing. Lot's of people in China are far more concerned to fit in than to stand out.

    Maybe we're all prone to assume that something or other is the greatest thing in life, be it money, fame, love, religiosity, or whatever. And if that chosen whatever is the greatest thing, then do we have any valid excuse not to go flat out for the gold medal in that, even if it's to the exclusion of almost everything else?

    Chua's book makes you think, and we need to think a lot. We know those kids on the Olympic podiums spent their entire childhoods striving for their moments of glory. We know there were huge costs. We also know that the kids who never really strove for anything have no future we'd want. But is life just a relentless competition for the top spot? Or does the art of life involve finding the best balance?

    --author of A Galaxy of Immortal Women: The Yin Side of Chinese Civilization

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 26, 2012

    Kali (creator/destroyer godess) as a mother in the modern world

    Chua is a powerful, intelligent writer. Her book exposes how she tipped the balance by holding too tightly to her belief system in raising her children. It is not really the cultural difference of Chinese philosphy versus Western philosphy.It is the struggle between the rational mind and the heart.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2012

    Good

    Raced through it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2012

    My parents immigrated from Ghana and I think Amy was right when

    My parents immigrated from Ghana and I think Amy was right when she referenced Ghanaian parents. While I am not big on extreme's, I do appreciate the strictness with which I was raised. I grew up in a predominately African American county and was restricted from participating in 95% of the things my African American friends were able to due. Education was paramount in our household and while I hated it back then, I recognize the fact that I am now benefiting from the rigidness they believed in. I do plan on incorporating many of the techniques my parent's used but at the same time tempering them with a few western sensibilities. I think a strict upbringing can be complimented with other activities to help raise well rounded children. My parents didn't raise a successful robots and I don't plan to either.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 9, 2012

    Battle Hymn holds the kind of suspense and intrigue usually limi

    Battle Hymn holds the kind of suspense and intrigue usually limited to murder mysteries. If Chua’s goal was to produce an interesting family memoir—mission accomplished. If the purpose was to show how Chinese parents are better at raising kids than Western ones, the author essentially admits her outlook has evolved. If nothing else, this book will make you think about achievement, self-esteem, love and what successful parenting really means.

    Unlike many, I found Chua to be a sympathetic character. It would be easy to join the tide of parents and media who have labeled Chua a monster for her tale of extreme parenting. I was exhausted just reading about her daily schedule, not to mention her epic battles with her youngest daughter Lulu. On some level, albeit an intense level, Chua is just another mother trying to figure things out; making her mistakes along the way.

    I would definitely recommend this book to a friend.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 21, 2012

    recommended

    interesting book. not as bad as reported. you musr understand that it is written for entertainment. so far no misprints as in other books that i have read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2012

    Very interesting novel.

    Very interesting novel, not the most well written though. Amy has introduced a topic that not many of us are comfortable with. Using the term "chinese mother"very loosely, she has definetaly brought up dome stereotypes. All in all a very entertaining memoir.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2012

    Surprisingly interesting and satisfying. Insight from a 12 year old.

    I am only 12 years old, yet i find battle hymn of the tiger mother gives me a new perspective on growing up. Because Amy is quite exteme with her kids sometimes,some may find this hard to read. My mother is also chinese and she expects mich from me. In a way I am greatful that she is, but not as quite as expecting tiger mom. Overall this book is a mostly interesting, mind-expanding read that i would reccomend for others.



    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2012

    Wonderful insight into another culture!

    Must read for any American or Asian parent struggling to understand their parenting style.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 13, 2012

    Battle Hymn

    If you decide to read this book, just keep a very open mind. This is a memoir about Amy Chua's struggles and triumps as a mother. She wrote in the very beginning of the book that whenever she mention "Asian Mom/Parent" or "Western Mom/Parent", she does not mean ALL Asians or ALL Westerners. She is a graduate of Harvard Law and is teaching law at Yale. I am sure she could easily have used other words to describe the different parenting technique if she wanted to. But book writing is a business and by creating controversy she got a lot of buzz and publicity for the book and herself. I got curious myself when my lunch dates talked about "Tiger Moms", so now my Nook also got a copy of this book.


    Amy is a very strict mom who demand only excellence from her daughters. She only wanted the best for them and obviously also have the money to hire the best teachers. She also have the tenacity and perseverance to not give in but exert control over her kids and what she perceives to be the best for them. She also explain at the end that some parts of the book are supposed to be taken as jokes.

    Personally, parenting is very one of a kind. Different kids, different parents, different moods, different temperaments, different days, heck, even different times of the day will bring out different reactions from me. Being an immigrant myself, with grandfathers coming from the same Fujian province like Amy's grandparents, I can see and understand what she is trying to say. But we can not generalized discipline technique by culture alone. Both my parents grew up with discipline techniques that are way different from each other. Also I think that there could also be a generational difference. We also see a lot of Westerners and others who are well behave, high achievers and are excellent at their chosen careers. How many hours they read and studied or how they practice piano or violin or if they ever had a sleepover, we will not know unless one of them will write a book about their home life growing up.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 6, 2011

    Entertaining

    Interesting and funny

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 6, 2011

    Why all the uproar?

    As a new parent, I have been very intrigued by Amy Chua. of course, what was most interesting is how angry her book makes mothers (most of whom have neglected to read it). After venturing into this book with an open mind, I found 'The Battle Hymn if a Tiger Mom' to be deliciously honest and inspiring. What parent doesn't want their child to acheive their maximum potential?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 4, 2011

    Read with Open Mind

    I truly enjoyed reading this book. One must keep an open mind while reading the book. Culture differendes is definately a major theme of the book. Her methods may sound cruel at first but as you put yourself into the book, you understand where Amy is coming from. A great book for teen agers as well as adults.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 30, 2011

    Really Liked It

    This book was entirely different than how it was portrayed in the media. This was a very good light read. Her parenting aside, it was very enjoyable. Throughout the book, Chua explores how merits in Chinese parenting are viewed as shortcomings in Western parenting and vice versa. Some of these merits/shortcomings include no play dates or sleepovers, nothing lower than an A, and learning a musical instrument chosen by the mother and practicing that instrument several hours everyday with no days off for being sick or on vacation. This book would be perfect for a book club as I'm sure it will spark many a parenting debate. As a parent, I disagreed with most of her parenting choices, but I do agree with her unwavering stance on this is what OUR family does and it doesn't matter what OTHER families do.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 166 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 9