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Because I Remember Terror, Father, I Remember You

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Posted June 30, 2012

    Exquisitely written book! Could not put it down. My Mother div

    Exquisitely written book! Could not put it down. My Mother divorced my Father when I was five years old. Had she stayed with him the outcome could very well have had this kind of abuse to me and my sister. My biological Father remarried and sexually abused my step sister. Her story did not end this well. She became a prostitute and heroin addict and died of aides. Sue Silverman is an exceptional writer and I am in awe that she survived this kind of terrible abuse. God Bless you Sue and keep your beautiful spirit safe for the rest of your life.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2003

    wonderfully honest book

    this is a brutally honest book of incestual abuse that should be read by all. i could not put it down. very well written and easily understood

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2012

    Most personal story I've ever read.

    Thank you, Sue, for putting on paper what so many of us have had trouble verbalizing. I will always cherish reading a story with emotions and thoughts I experience. If any book has ever spoken directly to me, as if we were sitting together over coffee in my home sharing our true, most honest accounts, it is this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 24, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    HAUNTING

    There are pieces of this story that will stay with you forever. It is shocking and painful but impossible to put down. What strikes me most about this book is the human capacity for forgiveness even when not in any way warrented.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2005

    Gripping and Heart-wretchingly Honest

    The title lives up to its name. It's hard to believe a father could do the things to a daughter that this one does. Unfortunately, it is all to common. This story is brillantly written, easy to follow, and brutally honest. It will tear at your heart and make you think. This was definitely one book I had a hard time putting down.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2003

    Well Written and Brutally Honest

    The story of Sue William Silverman deserves to be much more widely known. Her story is painful, yet she wrote with great insight and no sense of self pity. It had to be very confusing for her as she was growing up, and she was able to sort out all the pieces and put them back together in a clear, honest way. Remarkable story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2005

    Terror Indeed

    Review of ¿Because I Remember Terror, Father, I Remember You¿ by Sue William Silverman. 1996. Athens, Georgia. ISBN: 0-8203-1870-1. Autobiography, abuse. This memoir depicts the devastating abuse of a child born to a prominent man and his pretentious wife. This family that includes two daughters lived on an exotic foreign island as well as an ordinary American city. The father had important careers in banking and law. Nothing was more important to the mother than the appearance of a family as normal. But what is normal when one daughter dashes in and out of the house daily while the other is imprisoned nightly as her father repeatedly rapes her? The sisters do not confide in anyone, and the entire family is without communication of any kind. ¿In our family we don¿t know words to soothe each other¿s hurts.¿ Except that the patriarch finds comfort by taking his daughter¿s body, mind, and spirit. Written in present tense, this first-person narrative begins with writing that illustrates emotions in a most extra-ordinary prose. ¿I sit rigid on a couch and stare at the plant by the window, wishing I were small enough, light enough, to curl up inside one of the cool green leaves and sleep.¿ After experiencing parental rape from the age of four to eighteen, Sue tries to cope by creating alternative personalities; her authentic self had been lost in the isolation of secrets and shame. ¿I am without will.¿ The mother blames Sue, and not the father for the deviant sexual acts of the father: her mother calls her the ¿slut daughter.¿ In reference to her mother coming towards her after her father has raped her, Sue writes, ¿by the time my mother reaches the spot where my body once was, I know it is not me she touches¿it is not my arm her fingernails puncture.¿ Long after she escapes the abuse, Sue sustains the familiar in self-injury. She¿d been love-starved; in adulthood she literally starves herself. Sue startles the reader with how emotionally annihilated a child is rendered by abuse. Before the father loses his importance to old age, he vaguely excuses his egregious crimes by admitting that his mother had molested him. But Sue knows the truth: ¿That just because you are molested as a child does not mean you must grow up to be a molester.¿ Once, just once, Sue hears from her mother ¿I¿m so sorry.¿ Sue tends to her parents while they are dying. As a reader, I struggle to understand how she can be there for them when they were not there for her. Sue thinks about her mother¿s cremation, shocking the reader again with what we dare not ponder: ¿black brick oven where her naked body sleeps.¿ Sue¿s authentic self slowly returns to her when she begins to heal under the patient guidance of a therapist, the steadfast love of her husband, and a new connection with her sister. The reader rejoices with Sue while she saves others even as she saves herself: Silverman teaches English composition and comforts women and children. This book is the winner of the Associated Writing Programs Award for Creative Nonfiction, and there is no wondering why.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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