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Before We Were Free

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  • Posted December 15, 2010

    An Engrossing Tale that Tugs at your Heart-Strings

    Random House, Inc. publishing company made the right decision in publishing Julia Alvarez's 2002 novel, Before We Were Free. In this engrossing 163-page novella, the reader follows the struggle of 12-year-old Anita and her family's grueling quest for freedom. As the narrator of the story, it is easy to begin to understand and feel for Anita. Being the daughter of a hero radically opposing the dictatorship in the Dominican Republic, she feels pressure that should never be felt by a girl of her age. All she wants is to be free, and that means leaving her country for the United States. Throughout the novel she survives things that even the strongest of people would find horrifying, living in appalling conditions and suffering great losses. Most will find it difficult to resist gaining respect for this resilient young girl. Anita, too, must face the difficult challenge of growing up while in the midst of her fight for freedom. The reader quickly develops affection for Anita as she awkwardly makes the jump from child to young woman. Because she keeps a diary, you get to know her innermost secrets and look into her world and the emotions she feels while going through such a confusing time, and therefore it is as though you connect with her on a very personal level. I liked the book because of its surprising twists and turns, which kept me captivated and itching to read on. At one point, the book turns into Anita's Diary for a few pages, which was unique and provided further insight into her mind. From watching her fall in love (more than once) to finding out about her family's double life, I was constantly on the edge of my seat. The ending was phenomenal. Julia Alvarez uses stunning symbolism here, as Anita stares out of her window looking at the snow angels she had made earlier. "What I see as I look down aren't angels but butterflies, the arm swings connecting to the leg swings like a pair of wings, our heads poking out in between! I'm sure if Chucha were here, she would say they are a sign. Four butterflies from Papi, reminding me to fly." Flying to freedom and away from her dictator are all she strives for through the entire story. This little metaphor was both cute and meaningful, illustrating her drive to be free. I learned a lot from this book. For example, I never knew how desperate the people of the Dominican Republic were or how they were treated. I found out that people actually suffered the trauma represented through the book, and were driven to almost unthinkable things. I learned a few Spanish words as well, that were scattered in italics throughout the novel. I would recommend this book to anyone who would enjoy a thrilling novel that makes you think. It's a gut-wrenching and suspenseful tale that makes you feel like you are there seeing and experience the unjust treatment plaguing the impoverished country of the Dominican Republic. Before We Were Free is a quick, easy read that could be enjoyed by most.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2008

    An outstanding novel

    Julia ALverez's Before We Were Free is an excellend and very exciting novel. The book is about a young girl names Anita de la torre. Anita is a 12 year old girl who grew up in the Dominican Republic under the dictatorship of Jrujillo in the 1960's. Her whole life Anita has lived in a family compound built by her grandfather. Each time one of her cousins or other relatives married her grandfather would build another house in the compound. Anitas grandparents recently emmigrated for New York to get out of the country but she had no idea why. The contry is going through a tough time under the cruel dictatorship of Trujillo. Anitas uncle Tio Toni has to go into hiding and stay out of public. Anitas cousins and the rest of their families have also emmigrated for New York. The compound is almost completely empty with the departure of Anitas relatives. All that remains are Anita, Lucinda her sister, Mundin her brother, her mom, her dad, Chucha and Tio Toni shows up from time to time. Soon after Anitas faily and their house are searched and raided by the SIM secret police. They are watched for weeks and papa is also followed to work by a couple of all black volkswagons. The only thing Anita can do to feel free is write down everything in her diary. A couple weeks after the raid Anita and her family are getting new neighbors, the Washburn family. Anita and her family feel a lot more comfortable now that the secret police have left. After this many events come into place, Anita meets the Washburns son Sam and realizes she has met her first love, after recieving flowers from the cruel Trujillo Anitas sister Lucinda is deported out of the Donican Republic so she is not taken away from her family, Mundin now has to live with the Italian embassador now that the family is in danger, and after all the secret talk in Tio Tonis casseta him and papi set out to kill Trujillo. Now Anits and her mother cannot even stay in their home. They remain in their friends closet in hiding for months only coming out to eat scraps of food and to drink. Throughout this book Anita is growing up very fast. She is starting to realize what is going on around her but all she wants to do is gain her freedom. I really enjoyed this book. My mind got captured into the story and my attention was grabbed by the interesting writing style of the author. I would definetely recommend this book because it teaches people a lot of knowledge about the horrific yet exciting struggle of Dominican families during the dictatorship of Trujillo. I learned from this book to keep fighting for what you believe in and dont give up.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2008

    Page Turner

    Anita de la Torre is a 12 year old girl from the Dominican Republic. The dictator of her country is cruel and brutal. Anita's father and Tio Toni have put together a group of the Dominican's bravest men to take down the infamous leader, Trujillo. This secret organization is being watched closely by the SIM, or secret police. If anyone found out about the secret organization, or its plan, Anita's whole family would be murdered. Most of Anita's relatives have already fled to the United States to protect their lives. The only family she has left in the D.R. is her mother, father, brother, Chucha, and Lucinda. Chucha has been the family's maid since Anita was a baby. Chucha has a premonition about the events to come in the following year, she tells Anita that Anita, her mother, her brother, and Anita's sister will all spread their wings and fly home soon. As the secret organization comes closer to bringing down the dictator, things around the de la Torre house hold become very tense. Anita starts to feel like she is being treated like a child because no one wants to explain the horrific things that are happening. Also Anita's mother is trying to protect her from worrying, fearing she is too young to handle what could be a fatal outcome of the mens plans. Anita is not to worried about whats going on around her, not just because she doesn't completely understand, but because the United States consul just moved in next door. The consul has a son Anita's age named Sammy. Anita thinks she has fallen in love with Sammy and they become best friends. But when the consul gets involved with the secret plans of the group, they flee back to the U.S. for safety. Anita is heart broken, losing yet another loved one to the U.S. Previous to Sammy's departure, Anita's older sister was sent to the U.S. because she was being watched by Trujillo. Trujillo kept many young women hidden at his golf club, because he knew that his wife would never find his young love interests there. Lucinda was quickly sent to live with her aunt and uncle in New York, avoiding becoming one of Trujillo's women. Will the men over throw the dictator? Will they live to see their country freed? Will Anita spread her wings and fly? I highly recommend Before We Were Free because its a very interesting book. There's a lot of twists and turns in this novel, and it will leave you hungry for more. Julia Alvarez leaves you hanging on her every word, and with each new chapter, comes a new outlook on life.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 12, 2012

    Andrew Shields Before We Were Free by Julia Alvarez (published

    Andrew Shields
    Before We Were Free by Julia Alvarez (published in 2007) was an interesting novel written in the first person perspective of a twelve year old girl named Anita. The story takes place from 1960 to 1961 in the Dominican Republic while under the brutal dictatorship of Trujillo. Anita is a normal twelve year old girl living a happy life with a large and stable family. But that all changes very quickly as she starts to notice that many members of her family are beginning to disappear. She is left confused by this and because of the constant coming and going of her father and uncle tony. She soon learns that her father and uncle were part of a big plot to murder the dictator. Uncle tony has gone missing, the rest of the family has left for New York and Anita and her mother are left at the house. They are there hiding from the secret police that come and raid there house. 
    Anita receives a diary for Christmas and begins writing all of her thoughts, feelings and experiences in it. This really paints a clear image in the reader’s head of just how frightened Anita must have been. Anita is forced to grow up very fast and as the book progresses you can really see her grow to be a mature young woman. Throughout the book she shows incredible courage trying to get a hold of freedom. During this struggle she says “I wonder what it would be like to be free? Not to need wings because you don't have to fly away from your country?” This quote really makes you realize how a lot of us take freedom for granted and don’t understand that the struggle families like Anita’s went through during this period of dictatorship. 
    I enjoyed reading this book because although there were some slow points, the majority of the novel was very interesting and I found myself very engrossed in the book. Alvarez did a great job writing this book, Anita was a great choice for narrator and I really enjoyed how she had a diary that she wrote her thoughts and feelings down in. This gave the reader a clear understanding of how Anita was feeling throughout the story.
     Julia Alvarez grew up in the Dominican Republic during the time that Trujillo was the dictator. Although she was able to leave at age 10, she knew people that were forced to stay just like Anita and was informed of the struggle they went through just to survive. I would recommend this book to anyone who is looking for a short but interesting novel or anyone who is looking into learning about the hard times in the Dominican Republic with Trujillo as a dictator.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2014

    Good read

    It was an interesting read about a time in history I knew very little about.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 24, 2011

    Highly rec. if u r interested & up to date about the Dominican politics.Have met author. She writes from experience. Definitely moving story

    Have read the books written before & after. This makes sense if you have read In the time of the Butterflies & are interested in the dictatorship in the Dominican Republic--which I am..

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2002

    Before We Were Free

    Anita de la Torre never questioned her freedom growing up in the Dominican Republic. By her 12th birthday, her relatives start disappearing to the United States, her home is frequently searched by the secret police, and her family is forced into hiding. Suddenly she must struggle to overcome her fears and fly to freedom, leaving all she once knew behind. Julia Alvarez¿s way of capturing a reader and enabling them to feel like they are part of the story is unrivaled. She gives young readers a glimpse of what a life is like where a dictator¿s picture hangs on walls in every home, and young girls are hidden from his dangerous eyes. She opens the book slowly, and gently reveals to the reader some of the harsh realities of life under a dictator. In the book, the author follows one girl¿s journey throughout an entire year of life in an environment where she never knows what is going to happen next, and her and her family are constantly living in fear. Through this time period Anita learns some of the graphic truths about her family and her freedom as a citizen of the Dominican Republic, and is forced to overcome her fears and do things she has never imagined before. Alvarez gives the reader a good sense of what living under a dictatorship was like at the time, but also gives the reader a good idea of the relationship between Anita¿s family, as is visible when Anita¿s father pleads to her, ¿I want my children to be free, no matter what. Promise me you¿ll spread your wings and fly.¿ When I read this book, I connected it to other books and events that have taken place in the world¿s history. For example, when Anita and her mother were in hiding, and Anita kept a diary to pass the time, I was reminded of Anne Frank when she was in hiding during World War II in Amsterdam. Anne also kept a diary which, unlike Anita¿s, is now world famous. Anita and Anne were very similar in many ways, because both of their lives changed before their eyes and they had to learn to live in a way they had never known before. Both girls also did not get along well with their mothers during the time they were in hiding, although they became closer later on. Overall, I felt that Anita de la Torre and Anne Frank were very similar in more ways than one. Although I was able to get into this book from the very beginning, there are some strategies that a reader can use to help them to better understand the text. Alvarez writes in such detail that it easy for the reader to constantly visualize what they are reading. As I was reading, I felt that applying this strategy helped me to feel as if I was really there in the Dominican Republic with Anita and her family. Having never lived in a country other than the United States, this was an extremely important strategy because I had to imagine what it was like in a country where there aren¿t big buildings and shopping malls everywhere, where it is always hot, and the people aren¿t like the people I have been exposed to in the United States. Most importantly, I have never lived under a dictatorship where my freedoms are stripped from me and I don¿t have half the rights I do in the United States, which is why visualizing is such a key strategy when reading this book. Because of my lack of knowledge about this country, I tried to use the little I do know about dictatorships and other countries like the Dominican Republic to help me as I read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2012

    Good

    I will warn you right now, this not a book for boys! This is a wonderful coming of age story. I would recommend this book for ages 12 and up.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2010

    Inspiring and Captivating! A book you must read

    Before We Were Free by Julia Alvarez is an interesting and gripping novel for many reasons. It tells the story of twelve-year old Anita de la Toree in the 1960's. Her and her family and friends are living in the Dominican Republic, and are living through the civil unrest and revolution under the authority of General Trujillo. Anita's cousins, sister, and friends are forced to leave the Dominican Republic, her school closes, and she eventually must hide from the secret police that are terrorizing families because of suspected resistance to General Trujillo. Anita writes in her journal, "We're in the crawl space- and I'm scribbling down this note by flashlight just in case anyone finds this diary- There was a huge roar in the backyard like a plane landing- now a crashing sound at the downstairs door- Oh my god- they're coming through the house!!!!- My hand is shaking so hard- but I want to leave this record just so the world knows-" (Alvarez, 137). Anita soon finds that no one can be trusted and she must suffer through life as her freedom is taken away from her and her people. She quickly discovers her own family's part in a secret movement against their leader, and while all this is going on, she is growing into a young woman.
    Next, Anita experiences crushes and learns how to grow up. Told through Anita's point of view, Alvarez shows a story of a young girl growing up through extreme transformations with herself and her country. Anita says toward the end of the novel, ".it doesn't seem scary to die, I think it's scarier to be alive, especially when you feel that you'll never be as happy and carefree as when you were a little kid" (Alvarez, 162). This quote expresses that Anita goes through things that make her realize that life is tough, it's not always going to be fun and relaxed. Next, earlier on in the story, her mother reassures Anita by stating, "And someday, we will be free, and all your cousins and aunts and uncles will come back and thank us" (Alvarez, 52). Also, Anita says, "The emptiness inside starts filling with a strong love and a brave pride" (Alvarez 163). These statements express the sacrifices one has to make for the people we love and the immense pride and gratitude people can have for others.
    Although written in English, Julia Alvarez uses many cultural words and phrases through out the novel, such as, "Es mi hijita", or it's my little girl. Before We Were Free is inspiring and captivating. I read it for a school project and I soon found that I couldn't put it down. Towards the end it emphasizes on the hardships of life and the risks and challenges a person must go through to help others. This novel tells the tale of a strong, young girl who was forced to grow up much to fast and her family as they stuck close together and stayed strong. Lastly, it can inspire readers to realize how much they have and to not take anything for granted. If you enjoy compelling and heartwarming stories, then Before We Were Free is the book for you.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 13, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Before We Were Free

    Anita is almost twelve years old, and can't wait to grow up. But now that she stands on the edges of the adult world, nothing seems so simple and so good anymore. El Jefe, whom she once thought the great leader of her country, is a monster. Her parents and their friends speak in code. Everyone is afraid. Change is coming, not just for Anita, but for her family and the Dominican Republic, and Anita must find the courage to face it.

    Before We Were Free is an engaging portrait of a young girl's growing awareness of what it means to live in the Dominican Republic dictatorship. Despite a bit of a slow start, Julia Alvarez does an excellent job of drawing the reader into the scary, sad, and sweet moments that shape Anita's adolescence.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 4, 2009

    Review "Before We Were Free"

    Before We Were Free is a story of a young girl, Anita De La Torre, that shows the struggle of her family and the courage she shows in herself. Anita De La Torre is twelve years old living under the dictatorship of Trujillo and living peacefully until one day finds everyone except her immediate family to be fleeing to America. Anita doesn¿t understand what is happening around her and doesn¿t know when she will see her family again. She over hears some information from outside her window were her father meets but it is all said with code words for protection from the secret police. During these struggles, Anita has become friends with the new American neighbor, Sam. Also she¿s quickly maturing and growing into a young woman. Anita¿s Tio Toni has disappeared and the secret police have stormed there house in search for him and anything suspicious. The secret police find the dictator assassinated in one of the family¿s cars, and Anita¿s father and brother are taken away. Anita slowly finds out that her family is involved in an underground movement to overthrow the dictator Trujillo. Anita and her mother have no choice but to flee. Anita is forced to leave everything she once knew and displays the strength she needs to handle the terrifying circumstances.<BR/><BR/>I enjoyed this book very much, it displays the conflicts that may occur between citizen and its country that aren¿t seen from first glance and how the people may stand up for the country they need. Also it shows the courage that young Anita has to keep moving forward and not focusing on what she has lost in the Dominican Republic.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2008

    A Compelling Novel

    Before we were Free by Julia Alvarez is a compelling novel that lets you experience the story of a 12 year old girl named Anita de la Torre living in the Dominican Republic. She and her family lived through a tough time of a dictatorship in the 1960¿s. Anita is puzzled as more and more of her family escape to the freedom of the United States and she and her immediate family are left behind wishing for the time when they get their chance to fly free. During the time that they must stay they get visited by the SIMS or the secret police, her father receives secret phone calls, her Tio Toni is missing and she must go through her own personal battles. Anita receives a diary for Christmas and she begins to write all her thoughts down and the events that are happening in hope if someone finds it they will know the truth. She continues to write of her sister leaving for the U.S, her first crush and her hopes of being free. ¿We are finally settled in and Mami has said, go ahead, write in your diary as much as you want, we¿re in trouble already, maybe you can leave a record that will help others who are in hiding, too.¿ Eventually it gets to dangerous for the rest of her family to remain at the compound and they go into hiding at a friend¿s house. There she continues to write of the conditions she must live in and the fear and panic they go through day after day. ¿They¿re coming through the house!! My hand was shaking so hard-but I want to leave this record just so the world knows¿. In my opinion this novel is interesting because the author Julia Alvarez lived in the Dominican Republic at the time of the dictatorship. She came to the United States when she was ten years old. This novel was inspired by true stories of the fight for freedom of other people she knew. It demonstrates devotion to family and love for your country and to sacrifice everything you have to make your country and the citizens free.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2007

    'for those who stayed'

    Title: Before We Were Free Author: Julia Alvarez Published By: Alfred A. Knopf Published In: New York Before We Were Free was a strong and emotional novel that spoke about a young girl and her family's struggle for freedom in the Dominican Republic. Anita de la Torre, the main character, was a young 12 year old Dominican. She was the novel's narrator throughtout the entire book. Anita was a young inoscent girl whos family struggled for freedom in the dominican republic. While much of her family was disappearing, she was forced to stay. During this struggle she realizes that she is a brave, intelligent, and devoted young woman. Her role was to show how hard it was to gain freedom in the 1960's. Before We Were Free was an extremely touching novel that defined what it was like to want freedom from ones country. This novel spoke about Anita and her cousin, Carla, two young girls spending yet another day in school. When suddenly their class is inturrupted and they are called out. Anita's family slowly begins to leave the Dominican Republic and go to the U.S. but her immediate family remains. After some time many random house searches keep coming up. Her and her family are then forced into hiding in their family friends home, the Mancinis. During this time from June 3, 1961 until July 30 1961 Anita kept a very detailed diary that spoke about what she may have done that day or the previous one. Although hiding was not fun for Anita and her family it was better than being caught by the 'secret police'. While the days grew longer Anita continuously grew bored. I liked this novel because it spoke about gaining freedom and the struggle it took to get there. It showed even when u want to give up you shouldn't. The novel teaches people today what it was like to live in the Dominican Republic in the 1960's. For example, when gaining freedom Anita said 'I wonder what it would be like to be free? Not to need wings because you don't have to fly away from your country?' This really amazed me that there was a time when peoples dreams were to simply have freedom and rights to do as they please. Also, 'Don't worry,' Mundin says, 'I don't think a bullet can get throught that coffin!' 'Bullets! I sit right up in bed.' says Anita. This shows that the road to freedom is not an easy one! During this book I learned that I should always be grateful for what my country provides me. Freedom, Liberty, and Safety. I also learned what it was like for a young teen living in the Dominican Republic in the 1960's. I would recommend this book to everyone that enjoys learning about gaining independence and freedom. Also if you enjoy learning more about Hispanic History. I recommend this novel because it really opens your eyes to what previously had happened with racial problems.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2007

    Captivating

    Julia Alvarez's Before We Were Free is a captivating novel about a young girl named Anita de la Torre finding herself grasping for freedom. This book encompasses Julia Alvarez¿s thoughts on dictatorships as she herself grew up under one when she was younger. Anita de la Torre is a twelve-year-old girl who grew up in the Dominican Republic under Trujillo¿s rule in the late 1950s- mid 1960s. Her whole life she has lived with her family in their family compound, but recently her grandparents left for New York and she doesn¿t know why. Next thing you know her Tio Toni disappears and her cousins and their family leave suddenly for New York as well. Anita and her family (Papi, Mami, Lucinda, Mundin, and Chucha) become the only family left in their compound. After this things move extremely fast pace. From her finding that someone has been in her Tio Toni¿s casita to the secret police (SIM) raiding her house. All Anita feels she can do is to write in her journal so that if anything happens to her someone will know what happened. In the midst of all this chaos, Anita manages to find her first love, as well as starting to become a young woman. The themes of this book are definitely becoming of age and freedom. Throughout the entire novel, Anita is trying to seize the freedom she knows is right there, growing up extremely fast all the while. I really enjoyed this book. It grasped my attention very quickly and i got quite captured in the story. I felt like I was right there with Anita sharing her struggles. I would definitely recommend this book to people because i learned a lot while reading it. I learned some Spanish words and phrases such as 'Camaron que se duerme, se lo lleva la corriente,' meaning the shrimp who falls asleep is carried off by the current. I also learned to no matter what keep fighting for what you believe in and stay strong until the end.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2007

    Good book

    I really enjoyed it. I picked it up myself thinking it had a interesting title. It wasn't what i thought it would be, but it was still a good read.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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