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Bellman & Black

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Bellman and BlackDiane SetterfieldSetterfield's first book, Thir

Bellman and BlackDiane SetterfieldSetterfield's first book, Thirteenth Tale, was a wonderful story that I love and recommend but find hard to explain. With Bellman and Black,  she's done it again. The cover describes it as "a ghost story", but I'd have a hard ...
Bellman and BlackDiane SetterfieldSetterfield's first book, Thirteenth Tale, was a wonderful story that I love and recommend but find hard to explain. With Bellman and Black,  she's done it again. The cover describes it as "a ghost story", but I'd have a hard time explaining exactly who is haunting whom.William Bellman is a young man when his uncle takes him under his wing and begins grooming him to take over the family cloth mill. Thanks to skill, a little luck, and incredibly hard work, Bellman expands and eventually inherits the business. His personal life is likewise sucessful, until one day tragedy strikes. Mourning at the grave of his dearest loved one, Bellman meets a mysterious man named Black, who offers him an opportunity. Inspired, Bellman envisions a new business, which he names Bellman and Black. His business is successful beyond his wildest dreams- until one day, after years it suddenly isn't. On the downward slope from a peak of success, Bellman begins to wonder who exactly his invisible business partner is, and what kind of deal he has made.Rooks figure largely in this story (if there is any specific ghost, it is a rook.) Death is part of life in this story. Color and the many shades of black are also a focal point.Summed up, it Bellman and Blackdoesn't sound wildly compelling. Oh but it is! This is one of those books where the power of the story (and the beauty of the writing) is greater than the basic plot. Its true gothic Victorian-style horror- chilling exactly because so much is left implied. The descriptions of color, cloth and materials are especially lush. I lost myself thoroughly in the pages of description for Bellman's business.If you want a story that is compelling, frightening, and gorgeous all at once, pick upBellman and Black when it goes on sale this week. Maybe, in the end, its the story that haunts you....You might like: Tiger's Wife,Obrect. Bookman's Tale, Lovett.Thirteenth Tale, Setterfield.

posted by sams-kitten on November 8, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

12 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

Dark Historical Fiction

Does one deserve all the good they receive in life? What would you pay for happiness; can you put a value on it? Bellman & Black by Diane Setterfield explores this question in a haunting and intriguing way! We meet William Bellman as a child, who in a moment of less tha...
Does one deserve all the good they receive in life? What would you pay for happiness; can you put a value on it? Bellman & Black by Diane Setterfield explores this question in a haunting and intriguing way! We meet William Bellman as a child, who in a moment of less than stellar thinking commits an act of cruelty resulting in the death of a black crow. Growing up, he becomes a man of integrity, a successful businessman with a loving family. When tragedy strikes his family and brings him to his knees, a mysterious figure enters his life. Mr. Black becomes his “partner” and we see him as a shadow-like figure, dark and ominous. Will this partnership be the ruin of William in the long run?

Diane Setterfield has created a stark tale, not quite Hitchcock, but still dark with a foreboding message within. The pace is not fast, it is to be savored and allowed to build within your mind as each scene unfolds into the next, clearly drawing the reader into William’s era in time. Ms. Setterfield kept Mr. Black in the dark, revealing little about him until the book begins to wind down, adding to the mystery. William was a good character, not overly fleshed out, but I lacked that “connection” I wanted with him.

There is no major build up to a climax, this isn’t that kind of book, it lends more to using your own imagination to create a Technicolor mood. The pace is slower, the attention to the detail of each scene is done with care as it crosses through the years in William’s life. I wanted to connect more than I did to this dark piece.

I received an advance review copy from Atria Books in exchange for my honest review.

posted by DiiMI on October 17, 2013

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  • Posted October 17, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Dark Historical Fiction

    Does one deserve all the good they receive in life? What would you pay for happiness; can you put a value on it? Bellman & Black by Diane Setterfield explores this question in a haunting and intriguing way! We meet William Bellman as a child, who in a moment of less than stellar thinking commits an act of cruelty resulting in the death of a black crow. Growing up, he becomes a man of integrity, a successful businessman with a loving family. When tragedy strikes his family and brings him to his knees, a mysterious figure enters his life. Mr. Black becomes his “partner” and we see him as a shadow-like figure, dark and ominous. Will this partnership be the ruin of William in the long run?

    Diane Setterfield has created a stark tale, not quite Hitchcock, but still dark with a foreboding message within. The pace is not fast, it is to be savored and allowed to build within your mind as each scene unfolds into the next, clearly drawing the reader into William’s era in time. Ms. Setterfield kept Mr. Black in the dark, revealing little about him until the book begins to wind down, adding to the mystery. William was a good character, not overly fleshed out, but I lacked that “connection” I wanted with him.

    There is no major build up to a climax, this isn’t that kind of book, it lends more to using your own imagination to create a Technicolor mood. The pace is slower, the attention to the detail of each scene is done with care as it crosses through the years in William’s life. I wanted to connect more than I did to this dark piece.

    I received an advance review copy from Atria Books in exchange for my honest review.

    12 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 6, 2013

    I hate to say this, but Bellman & Black was a complete letdo

    I hate to say this, but Bellman & Black was a complete letdown. Okay, maybe not a complete letdown, but a pretty big one. I am a huge fan of The Thirteenth Tale. I devoured that book in two days and loved every single page. It was an amazing debut novel that I will push on anyone looking for a chilling Gothic tale. As much as it pains to me say this, I cannot say the same about Bellman & Black.




         The novel started out beautifully, albeit a little slow. Diane's prose are so wonderfully constructed that you cannot help but love her narration and writing technique. Unfortunately, the slowness does not pick up and the characters and plot do not live up to the amazing writing. Despite the high quality of the narrative, the story didn't grip my interest. It's almost as if nothing happens. We are told these day to day events of William Bellman, a man whose fortune goes from good to bad in a matter of months.




         The plot is thin and the characters uninteresting. Most of these characters end up dying, but I don't know enough about them to be upset or even care in the slightest. So much detail went into how the mill and shop were run, but it all is filler. I would have much preferred to learn more about these characters - there is no depth to them or their lives. I wanted to dive into Bellman & Black, not skim along the surface.




         I would normally star a DNF with a 1/5, but due to Diane's amazing writing style, I did feel that 1/5 was a too harsh. Her writing style is reminiscent of classic Gothic novels that we all know and love. Her meticulously detailed scenes put you into the scenery and allow you a clear picture. Her sporadic chapters from the point of view of the rooks also indicate her obvious research into the history and behavior of rooks that added a little extra something to the novel itself.




         For as much as I loved The Thirteenth Tale, it's unfortunate that I couldn't even finish Bellman & Black - I got about 161 pages in and that took me about a week to accomplish. 

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 5, 2013

    In the beginning, I was completely engrossed by this book, but

    In the beginning, I was completely engrossed by this book, but after reading it, I felt like something was missing, almost like I'd been cheated. William Bellman was easy to like, initially. I enjoyed seeing him build his career and family and he was immensely happy in doing so. He was a smart businessman and a wonderful husband and father - at first. As stated in the book description, William suffers many losses and his priorities change. I found it interesting that when he first began work in the mill, William surrounded himself with vibrant colors, full of life - but when his circumstances changed, he seemed to shun bright colors, finding them vulgar, preferring grays and blacks. Interesting parallel with his life events.

    Bellman & Black is described as a ghost story, which was what initially made me want to read it, but it never really had the feel of a ghost story. I'm assuming the "ghost" had something to do with Black, but his character and purpose were never really made clear. As the story progressed, I kept waiting for something to happen - some big plot surprise or heart of the story - but by the middle of the book, I realized that was never going to develop.

    The writing was impressive and flowed very well, the narrative was wonderful and something that happens between William and Black in the end will make the reader think. However, after taking a few days to contemplate this book before writing the review, I still feel like the author never really got her point across and I even looked back through the book several times thinking maybe I missed something. Describing Bellman & Black as a ghost story is misleading - dark and depressing, definitely - scary and suspenseful, no, not even in the gothic sense. I'll be interested to see what other readers have to say about this book - maybe they can figure out the purpose of this story.

    This review is based on a digital ARC from the publisher through NetGalley.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 5, 2013

    I¿d have to say it¿s rather difficult to describe my emotional s

    I’d have to say it’s rather difficult to describe my emotional state after finishing BELLMAN & BLACK: A GHOST STORY. On the one hand, this was a well-written, slowly developing story that caused me to contemplate the consequences of all my actions, not just the major, life changing experiences; on the other, it did have ghostly elements, but when I picture a ghost story, this isn’t exactly what I have in mind. It’s more of a literary ghost story where you realize the ghosts are there, but they hover above the playing field and never really step out onto the grass. It also develops this phrase in narrative form: Be careful what you wish for, because you just might get it. Which proves an interesting expression to ponder for a novel, but I never felt like I was fully invested in this tale.

    The dialogue proved a bit pretentious for me with many characters never really becoming enamored with contractions. While William Bellman was certainly an interesting and intriguing character, he never grabbed my attention the way I hoped he would. He was stiff and aloof and more than a tad bit prickly, rigid, and distant. And the pace often proved a bit too leisurely for my tastes. It was more of a meandering jaunt in a field of lilies than a race in an open field. But the writing often sung a soprano solo in the middle of December, I just found myself only half-listening.

    In the end, I wanted to enjoy this story, and even though I tried a bit too hard at times to do so, ultimately I just wasn’t the right audience. Since I received THE THIRTEENTH TALE in my Bouchercon book bag, I’ll take it for a spin on the merry-go-round, but I’ll do so with a bit more careful consideration.

    I received this book for free through NetGalley.

    Robert Downs
    Author of Falling Immortality: Casey Holden, Private Investigator

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2013

    Boring

    Hated this book

    3 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2013

    Diane Setterfield's award winning, debut novel - The Thirteenth

    Diane Setterfield's award winning, debut novel - The Thirteenth Tale, was a lovely, atmospheric 'ghost' story. Her second novel is Bellman and Black.

    Set in the past in England, Bellman and Black opens with young William Bellman launching the perfect slingshot volley - unexpectedly hitting it's target - a young rook. (a member of the crow family) That seemingly innocuous event forever marks young William's life. It isn't even an event he remembers. But he is afraid of birds.....

    Initially seen as a bit of a ne'er do well, young William finds his place in the world, successfully moving into a family business, marrying and having a family. But misfortune enters William's life as friends and family members die. And at each funeral William sees a mysterious man in black. A man with whom he eventually partners with in a new venture - a funeral emporium. Bellman and Black.

    I was very much looking forward the this second novel. But, I found myself somewhat disappointed. The story is slow to evolve, with much detail included in building both time and place. I did find the historical details included interesting, but I wanted more. I wanted something to happen. The man in black is mysterious, but there isn't enough of a build-up to the final reveal for me to be even remotely chilled.

    The role of rooks in history, myth and lore is discussed at the beginning of many chapters. Paying attention to that precluded any surprises that came with the final chapters.

    British cover versions of this book have added the sub-title of "A Ghost Story". This was not included on the North American cover. And wisely. While it's eerie, it doesn't cross into ghost territory in my opinion. Instead I found myself thinking of Poe's The Raven and Hitchcock's The Birds.

    Good, but not great for this reader. I found I was too easily able to put the book down. However, Setterfield's prose are excellent - I would pick up the next book by this author.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 10, 2013

    It was suitably filled with a creepy dark aura.  There seemed to

    It was suitably filled with a creepy dark aura. 
    There seemed to be a build-up in the story that never really led anywhere.
    The story of the rooks was mystical and dark. I didn't feel that the death of the rook was linked sufficiently to the 'ghost' or whatever it is that appears.
    I was expecting the rooks to feature more strongly in the story. Instead the focus wanders off to Dora, which isn't a bad thing except that stagnated also.
    Indeed the story was a lot of neither here nor there and far from clear. If the author was trying to outsmart the reader by being overly cryptic or mixing in subliminal messages then that didn't really work. Instead the story is bland and lacks the essence of darkness it started with.
    What exactly is the deal Bellman makes? The deal leads to the construction of the building but the reader is never clear on the details of the deal. Was the fate of his daughter linked to the deal or was that the natural order of things. Was Bellman taught a valuable lesson with every loss? How is that connected to his actions as a child?
    It was clear what the story should have been or where the author was headed but the execution of it lacked clarity.
    I received a copy of this book via NetGalley.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 8, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Bellman and BlackDiane SetterfieldSetterfield's first book, Thir

    Bellman and BlackDiane SetterfieldSetterfield's first book, Thirteenth Tale, was a wonderful story that I love and recommend but find hard to explain. With Bellman and Black,  she's done it again. The cover describes it as "a ghost story", but I'd have a hard time explaining exactly who is haunting whom.William Bellman is a young man when his uncle takes him under his wing and begins grooming him to take over the family cloth mill. Thanks to skill, a little luck, and incredibly hard work, Bellman expands and eventually inherits the business. His personal life is likewise sucessful, until one day tragedy strikes. Mourning at the grave of his dearest loved one, Bellman meets a mysterious man named Black, who offers him an opportunity. Inspired, Bellman envisions a new business, which he names Bellman and Black. His business is successful beyond his wildest dreams- until one day, after years it suddenly isn't. On the downward slope from a peak of success, Bellman begins to wonder who exactly his invisible business partner is, and what kind of deal he has made.Rooks figure largely in this story (if there is any specific ghost, it is a rook.) Death is part of life in this story. Color and the many shades of black are also a focal point.Summed up, it Bellman and Blackdoesn't sound wildly compelling. Oh but it is! This is one of those books where the power of the story (and the beauty of the writing) is greater than the basic plot. Its true gothic Victorian-style horror- chilling exactly because so much is left implied. The descriptions of color, cloth and materials are especially lush. I lost myself thoroughly in the pages of description for Bellman's business.If you want a story that is compelling, frightening, and gorgeous all at once, pick upBellman and Black when it goes on sale this week. Maybe, in the end, its the story that haunts you....You might like: Tiger's Wife,Obrect. Bookman's Tale, Lovett.Thirteenth Tale, Setterfield.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2013

    Hello B&N... the exerpt here is from Thirteenth Tale. Everyo

    Hello B&N... the exerpt here is from Thirteenth Tale. Everyone so far has said the book isn't that good. Give me a first chapter to read, and if I like it, maybe I'll check it out.

    2 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 17, 2013

    Disappointing

    I eagerly anticipated Diane Setterfield's new book. The 13th Tale was inventive, well written and genuinely intriguing. Bellman & Black misses the mark. As I read, I waited for "something" to happen, but little does. The literary style is perfect. I love Setterfield's use of language, but the plot is flat and boring. A young boy kills a rook, a mysterious man arrives when the boy reaches adulthood and everyone in his life dies a tragic death. The story implies the rook is the story keeper of mankind, but the premise falls short in the telling of this dark and brooding tale.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2013

    I have been reading novels for over 60 years and I think i have

    I have been reading novels for over 60 years and I think i have finally found it.  Bellman and Black is the stupidest book ever written.  Zero plot  and vapid characters.  She goes to great lenghts to describe every detail about the birds and the homes but when it comes toexplaining who Black is and what he has to do with this story, there is little to go on.  Just plain poor writing and construction. Do not buy this book.  David

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 24, 2013

     Bellman and Black is an engaging read, in the sense that it bri

     Bellman and Black is an engaging read, in the sense that it brings the reader beyond the written page. the publisher contributed the story to be a ghost story, but i find it on par with an Edgar Allen Poe story. Its dark subtext, its breath of meaning is so beyond the modern tale. Bellman is a boy, the forgotten son abandoned by his father at a young age, and left to find his place in the world. His struggles are symbolized by the life he leads, the ideals are expressed in poetry, and song, in struggle and triumph, eclipsed by images of rooks, and death. This is a moving tale, of over coming great obstacles but also of loss and grief, purpose and life.... It is a dark tale, but one that absorbs the reader. In broad strokes it shows the industrial age, and the great movement of business, and men  but ties it to a mythology that Poe would find endearing, and engaging.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 22, 2013

    I couldn't get into this book.  I loved the Thirteenth Tale, but

    I couldn't get into this book.  I loved the Thirteenth Tale, but this book just isn't good.  I spent 100 pages waiting for it to get good.  It feels like the author waits too long to introduce the real plot, so I have up.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 13, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    This is a deep story. There were a lot of twists that brought me

    This is a deep story. There were a lot of twists that brought me back to where I thought I was but then went off in another direction. There were a lot of historical facts and I learned things beyond what I thought I knew. The characters were down to earth types with the exception of William. One small incident ruled his whole life. I liked this book. It was definitely different from what I usually read. It was hard to put down and tugged at my heartstrings. Give this book a try and Enjoy!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 9, 2013

    That was fun! We meet William Bellman as a boy, with three of hi

    That was fun! We meet William Bellman as a boy, with three of his friends, showing off as boys do. The other boys all know their places in the village. Even though William is growing up with only his mother and his father’s family ignores him, William ends up in the family business and is very good at it. He has a loving wife and four children. Everything is going great for him, until his memories become too painful. At his lowest point, William meets a man he calls Mr. Black. At the end of that night, he only remembers Mr. Black’s idea for a new business venture and he calls the new business Bellman & Black. Along the way, he gets really good at forgetting the painful parts of his life and also loses the good parts along the way. Soon enough, William is all about the work. Rooks appear off and on throughout William’s life and there are great tidbits about rooks throughout the story. Lots of interesting pieces about mourning in Victorian times sprinkled through the story. Lots of connections get made at the end. Highly recommended. Received free copy for review.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2014

    Kept in Limbo

    Not sure what happened.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2014

    Good

    It is a story for telling round a fire, fantastical.

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  • Posted March 4, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    This is one of those books that even after you¿ve read it, you¿r

    This is one of those books that even after you’ve read it, you’re not entirely sure exactly what it was about. William Bellman killed a rook when he was 10 years old. Something changed in him that day, and he completely buried the memory of it. He never could stand the sight of birds afterwards. At age 17, William went to work at his uncle’s textile mill. It turned out that he had a brain for business, and before long he was revolutionizing the way the mill operated. As time moved on, people near and dear to William died, including his mother, his uncle, and his cousin, along with a friend or two. At each funeral, the same strange, unknown man was in attendance, and this fact puzzled and somehow troubled William. William inherited the mill and continued to turn a tidy profit. He eventually married and had his own family of 4 children. When an illness kills them all but his daughter, Dora, and leaves her fighting for her life, William is swayed from a suicide attempt by the same strange funeral-goer, the man that William will eventually refer to as Mr. Black. In order to take advantage of what he perceives as an opportunity presented by Mr. Black, William begins a new business empire, the mourning goods emporium known as Bellman and Black. William literally buries himself in his work, pushing his memories of the life he once had away, including his daughter Dora, who survived. Years down the line, and obsessed by making sure he can pay Black what he owes him should he come calling for his share of the business, Bellman realizes, too late, that his definition of “opportunity” and Mr. Black’s definition are quite different.

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  • Posted February 28, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    It was ok

    I really loved Diane Setterfield's first novel, The Thirteenth Tale. Bellman and Black is a different kind of story, and while well written, is just not as engrossing as her first book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 27, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Rooks and the industrial revolution. This novel was an interest

    Rooks and the industrial revolution.

    This novel was an interesting book for group discussion because, like The Thirteenth Tale, there were aspects of the narrative that were left to the discretion of the reader to unravel. It also contained passages of sheer brilliance; Ms Setterfield has a wonderful way with words. Unfortunately The Thirteenth Tale had a finale that left me blown away and that was missing from Bellman and Black. Our book group was also a bit underwhelmed by all the references to rooks.




    The introduction suggests that this is a ghost story, but I think readers would be disappointed if that is what they are hoping for. It's a painting of a man in the industrial revolution, who comes from a lower middle class family but makes good through sheer hard work and determination.
    William Bellman is an absolute workaholic. He starts out employed at his uncle's mill and eventually opens a one-stop-emporium for the sale of funereal items. I admired the author's descriptions of his work ethic, I almost felt exhausted just reading about how much he fitted into a day!




    Although the story opens with William shooting a perfect curve and slaying a young rook, it was questionable as to how this fitted in with the rest of the narrative. Did the rook haunt him throughout his life, or was it just an inspiration for all the shades of black that are later available in his mourning goods business? His life had its share of sorrows too - were these pay-back for the death of the rook?




    I loved the descriptions of industrial life in the textile mill, William's interactions with the staff and his dedication to the job. Then he opens his emporium and pours all of himself into that. Partly this is a reaction to the grief that is in his life, partly, I think, his whole work ethic. 
    I had expected more to come of Girl 9, I had hoped for some denouement. Who was the man lurking at the funerals and later named Mr Black? (My book group had a theory about that but no spoilers here!)




    The Thirteenth Tale was a hard act to follow and this fell a bit short. I shall still be rushing out to get a copy of anything else Diana Setterfield writes, but next time I hope we'll get a stunning ending :)

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