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Bellman & Black

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Bellman and BlackDiane SetterfieldSetterfield's first book, Thir

Bellman and BlackDiane SetterfieldSetterfield's first book, Thirteenth Tale, was a wonderful story that I love and recommend but find hard to explain. With Bellman and Black,  she's done it again. The cover describes it as "a ghost story", but I'd have a hard ...
Bellman and BlackDiane SetterfieldSetterfield's first book, Thirteenth Tale, was a wonderful story that I love and recommend but find hard to explain. With Bellman and Black,  she's done it again. The cover describes it as "a ghost story", but I'd have a hard time explaining exactly who is haunting whom.William Bellman is a young man when his uncle takes him under his wing and begins grooming him to take over the family cloth mill. Thanks to skill, a little luck, and incredibly hard work, Bellman expands and eventually inherits the business. His personal life is likewise sucessful, until one day tragedy strikes. Mourning at the grave of his dearest loved one, Bellman meets a mysterious man named Black, who offers him an opportunity. Inspired, Bellman envisions a new business, which he names Bellman and Black. His business is successful beyond his wildest dreams- until one day, after years it suddenly isn't. On the downward slope from a peak of success, Bellman begins to wonder who exactly his invisible business partner is, and what kind of deal he has made.Rooks figure largely in this story (if there is any specific ghost, it is a rook.) Death is part of life in this story. Color and the many shades of black are also a focal point.Summed up, it Bellman and Blackdoesn't sound wildly compelling. Oh but it is! This is one of those books where the power of the story (and the beauty of the writing) is greater than the basic plot. Its true gothic Victorian-style horror- chilling exactly because so much is left implied. The descriptions of color, cloth and materials are especially lush. I lost myself thoroughly in the pages of description for Bellman's business.If you want a story that is compelling, frightening, and gorgeous all at once, pick upBellman and Black when it goes on sale this week. Maybe, in the end, its the story that haunts you....You might like: Tiger's Wife,Obrect. Bookman's Tale, Lovett.Thirteenth Tale, Setterfield.

posted by sams-kitten on November 8, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

12 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

Dark Historical Fiction

Does one deserve all the good they receive in life? What would you pay for happiness; can you put a value on it? Bellman & Black by Diane Setterfield explores this question in a haunting and intriguing way! We meet William Bellman as a child, who in a moment of less tha...
Does one deserve all the good they receive in life? What would you pay for happiness; can you put a value on it? Bellman & Black by Diane Setterfield explores this question in a haunting and intriguing way! We meet William Bellman as a child, who in a moment of less than stellar thinking commits an act of cruelty resulting in the death of a black crow. Growing up, he becomes a man of integrity, a successful businessman with a loving family. When tragedy strikes his family and brings him to his knees, a mysterious figure enters his life. Mr. Black becomes his “partner” and we see him as a shadow-like figure, dark and ominous. Will this partnership be the ruin of William in the long run?

Diane Setterfield has created a stark tale, not quite Hitchcock, but still dark with a foreboding message within. The pace is not fast, it is to be savored and allowed to build within your mind as each scene unfolds into the next, clearly drawing the reader into William’s era in time. Ms. Setterfield kept Mr. Black in the dark, revealing little about him until the book begins to wind down, adding to the mystery. William was a good character, not overly fleshed out, but I lacked that “connection” I wanted with him.

There is no major build up to a climax, this isn’t that kind of book, it lends more to using your own imagination to create a Technicolor mood. The pace is slower, the attention to the detail of each scene is done with care as it crosses through the years in William’s life. I wanted to connect more than I did to this dark piece.

I received an advance review copy from Atria Books in exchange for my honest review.

posted by DiiMI on October 17, 2013

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  • Posted March 4, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    This is one of those books that even after you¿ve read it, you¿r

    This is one of those books that even after you’ve read it, you’re not entirely sure exactly what it was about. William Bellman killed a rook when he was 10 years old. Something changed in him that day, and he completely buried the memory of it. He never could stand the sight of birds afterwards. At age 17, William went to work at his uncle’s textile mill. It turned out that he had a brain for business, and before long he was revolutionizing the way the mill operated. As time moved on, people near and dear to William died, including his mother, his uncle, and his cousin, along with a friend or two. At each funeral, the same strange, unknown man was in attendance, and this fact puzzled and somehow troubled William. William inherited the mill and continued to turn a tidy profit. He eventually married and had his own family of 4 children. When an illness kills them all but his daughter, Dora, and leaves her fighting for her life, William is swayed from a suicide attempt by the same strange funeral-goer, the man that William will eventually refer to as Mr. Black. In order to take advantage of what he perceives as an opportunity presented by Mr. Black, William begins a new business empire, the mourning goods emporium known as Bellman and Black. William literally buries himself in his work, pushing his memories of the life he once had away, including his daughter Dora, who survived. Years down the line, and obsessed by making sure he can pay Black what he owes him should he come calling for his share of the business, Bellman realizes, too late, that his definition of “opportunity” and Mr. Black’s definition are quite different.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 13, 2013

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    This is a deep story. There were a lot of twists that brought me

    This is a deep story. There were a lot of twists that brought me back to where I thought I was but then went off in another direction. There were a lot of historical facts and I learned things beyond what I thought I knew. The characters were down to earth types with the exception of William. One small incident ruled his whole life. I liked this book. It was definitely different from what I usually read. It was hard to put down and tugged at my heartstrings. Give this book a try and Enjoy!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 9, 2013

    That was fun! We meet William Bellman as a boy, with three of hi

    That was fun! We meet William Bellman as a boy, with three of his friends, showing off as boys do. The other boys all know their places in the village. Even though William is growing up with only his mother and his father’s family ignores him, William ends up in the family business and is very good at it. He has a loving wife and four children. Everything is going great for him, until his memories become too painful. At his lowest point, William meets a man he calls Mr. Black. At the end of that night, he only remembers Mr. Black’s idea for a new business venture and he calls the new business Bellman & Black. Along the way, he gets really good at forgetting the painful parts of his life and also loses the good parts along the way. Soon enough, William is all about the work. Rooks appear off and on throughout William’s life and there are great tidbits about rooks throughout the story. Lots of interesting pieces about mourning in Victorian times sprinkled through the story. Lots of connections get made at the end. Highly recommended. Received free copy for review.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 27, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Rooks and the industrial revolution. This novel was an interest

    Rooks and the industrial revolution.

    This novel was an interesting book for group discussion because, like The Thirteenth Tale, there were aspects of the narrative that were left to the discretion of the reader to unravel. It also contained passages of sheer brilliance; Ms Setterfield has a wonderful way with words. Unfortunately The Thirteenth Tale had a finale that left me blown away and that was missing from Bellman and Black. Our book group was also a bit underwhelmed by all the references to rooks.




    The introduction suggests that this is a ghost story, but I think readers would be disappointed if that is what they are hoping for. It's a painting of a man in the industrial revolution, who comes from a lower middle class family but makes good through sheer hard work and determination.
    William Bellman is an absolute workaholic. He starts out employed at his uncle's mill and eventually opens a one-stop-emporium for the sale of funereal items. I admired the author's descriptions of his work ethic, I almost felt exhausted just reading about how much he fitted into a day!




    Although the story opens with William shooting a perfect curve and slaying a young rook, it was questionable as to how this fitted in with the rest of the narrative. Did the rook haunt him throughout his life, or was it just an inspiration for all the shades of black that are later available in his mourning goods business? His life had its share of sorrows too - were these pay-back for the death of the rook?




    I loved the descriptions of industrial life in the textile mill, William's interactions with the staff and his dedication to the job. Then he opens his emporium and pours all of himself into that. Partly this is a reaction to the grief that is in his life, partly, I think, his whole work ethic. 
    I had expected more to come of Girl 9, I had hoped for some denouement. Who was the man lurking at the funerals and later named Mr Black? (My book group had a theory about that but no spoilers here!)




    The Thirteenth Tale was a hard act to follow and this fell a bit short. I shall still be rushing out to get a copy of anything else Diana Setterfield writes, but next time I hope we'll get a stunning ending :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2014

    I think every reader will find a different meaning about life in

    I think every reader will find a different meaning about life in this book, and maybe that's the writer's objective here. I, too, wanted the deal with Black explained in detail. I went back to read the cemetery scene where Bellman had lost everything after Bellman met Black for the last time. It seemed to me that Black symbolized death that is always with us, In the cemetery he gave Bellman an "opportunity" which in Bellman's rigid, business mind was a business venture. I think Black was giving him an opportunity to love the daughter he had left and to care once more about something besides his business ventures. Bellman was not a greedy man, but instead, I think, kept his mind busy to forget all the pain in his life. I think the book is telling us that we have to break through our pain and loss in life and continue to love and enjoy the things and people we have around us. There's lots of symbolism in the book that will keep me pondering for a long time. I think the writer did an excellent job of letting us draw our own conclusions.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2014

    Attention to detail worth the read.

    I love "the thirteeth tale." A lot. Honestly, I started this book because of that love for the latter. I finished this book because I was facinated by the main character. I lost myself in this telling of a time forgotten. Bravo!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2013

    Such a way with words

    A story unlike any other!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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